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Pairing Food with the Wines of the Yarra Valley Slideshow

Pairing Food with the Wines of the Yarra Valley Slideshow


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Will Budiaman

Price: AUD 20 per 750-milliliter bottle (about $20.80) or AUD 108 for a case of six (about $112.32)

Tasting notes: Pronounced aromas of tropical fruit — pineapple. Fairly acidic yet creamy with notes of green bell pepper on the palate.

Suggested pairings: Latin chicken and fish dishes, salads, and salsa

Click here to see A Latin-Inspired Grilling Menu.

De Bortoli Yarra Valley Sauvignon Blanc, 2011

Will Budiaman

Price: AUD 20 per 750-milliliter bottle (about $20.80) or AUD 108 for a case of six (about $112.32)

Tasting notes: Pronounced aromas of tropical fruit — pineapple. Fairly acidic yet creamy with notes of green bell pepper on the palate.

Suggested pairings: Latin chicken and fish dishes, salads, and salsa

Click here to see A Latin-Inspired Grilling Menu.

De Bortoli Reserve Release EZ, 2012

Will Budiaman

De Bortoli Yarra Valley Syrah, 2010

Will Budiaman

Price: AUD 28 per 750-milliliter bottle (about $29.12) or AUD 151.20 for a case of six (about $157.25)

Tasting notes: Strong notes of white pepper on the nose and palate with a pronounced mineral finish and balanced tannins.

Suggested pairing: Seared pepper- or sesame-crusted tuna

Click here to see the Seared Tuna and Brown Rice Chirashi Recipe.

De Bortoli Reserve Melda, 2008

Will Budiaman

Price: AUD 45 per 750-milliliter bottle (about $46.80) or AUD 243 for a case of six (about $252.72)

Tasting notes: Strong aromas of raisin and other dried fruits. Bold fruit up front balanced by a medium-dry finish.

Suggested pairings: Moroccan tagine or couscous with dried fruit and nuts

Click here to see A Regional Approach to Moroccan Cooking.

De Bortoli Noble One, Sweet Botrytis Semillon, 2008

Will Budiaman

Price: AUD 33 per 375-milliliter bottle (about $34.32) or AUD 178.20 for a case of six (about $185.33)

Tasting notes: A dessert wine with pleasant aromas of orange and pronounced flavors of dried apricot.

Suggested pairings: Blue cheese, lemon tart, vanilla panna cotta

Click here to see the Classic Lemon Tart Recipe.

Oakridge Local Vineyard Series Denton Vineyard Chardonnay, 2011

Will Budiaman

Price: AUD 38 per 750-milliliter bottle (about $39.52)

Tasting notes: Slightly smoky, meaty aroma reminiscent of charcuterie. Bright citrus flavors of lemon and lime, well balanced.

Suggested pairing: Roast chicken or grilled fish

Click here to see How to Roast the Perfect Chicken.


Wine journey

While names like Bourdeux and Champagne are familiar to even the most casual of wine drinkers, Australian wines from the Yarra Valley is making inroads into the Chinese market. Belle Taylor reports.

Winemaker Willy Lunn is holding court in the Writers Room at Beijing's Raffles hotel. A chandelier sparkles overhead, a piano tinkles in the background, but all eyes are on the Australian in blue jeans and an open collar shirt, who looks like he'd be more at home by the farm gate than in a swish hotel.

"It's what I like to call a wine journey," Lunn tells the table of wine and lifestyle journalists clutching glasses of Yering Station Estate Pinot Noir.

"The wines should taste like where they were grown, not like who they were made by," he continues, as the journalists, all wine and lifestyle reporters, sniff, sip and spit the Pinot, a delicate wine with plum and black cherry flavors, which pair well with duck.

Lunn's "wine journey" takes place in the Yarra Valley, about an hour's drive from Melbourne in the Australian state of Victoria. It's a cool climate area, perfect for growing Pinot, which Yering Station is famous for.

The tasting at the Raffles not only included the excellent Chardonnay and Pinot produced at the winery - the reserve bottles of which are possibly some of the best examples of the varieties grown in Victoria, but also excellent Shiraz Viogner and Cabernet Sauvingon.

Lunn explains that the wines produced at Yering Station reflect whereabouts in the Yarra Valley the grapes were grown and under what conditions - whether they were grown on the hill which enjoys direct sunlight, or in the lower parts of the Valley. When they were picked and what the rainfall was like in the year they were grown are all factors that influence the final product.

Chatting after the tasting, Lunn says the importance of regionality is something Australian wine makers are eager to get across to Chinese tastemakers.

"In Australia and Europe we will talk about regionality. In Asia you have to say, 'look, we're from Australia', 'oh, they make wine?' That's the first barrier," says Lunn.


Wine journey

While names like Bourdeux and Champagne are familiar to even the most casual of wine drinkers, Australian wines from the Yarra Valley is making inroads into the Chinese market. Belle Taylor reports.

Winemaker Willy Lunn is holding court in the Writers Room at Beijing's Raffles hotel. A chandelier sparkles overhead, a piano tinkles in the background, but all eyes are on the Australian in blue jeans and an open collar shirt, who looks like he'd be more at home by the farm gate than in a swish hotel.

"It's what I like to call a wine journey," Lunn tells the table of wine and lifestyle journalists clutching glasses of Yering Station Estate Pinot Noir.

"The wines should taste like where they were grown, not like who they were made by," he continues, as the journalists, all wine and lifestyle reporters, sniff, sip and spit the Pinot, a delicate wine with plum and black cherry flavors, which pair well with duck.

Lunn's "wine journey" takes place in the Yarra Valley, about an hour's drive from Melbourne in the Australian state of Victoria. It's a cool climate area, perfect for growing Pinot, which Yering Station is famous for.

The tasting at the Raffles not only included the excellent Chardonnay and Pinot produced at the winery - the reserve bottles of which are possibly some of the best examples of the varieties grown in Victoria, but also excellent Shiraz Viogner and Cabernet Sauvingon.

Lunn explains that the wines produced at Yering Station reflect whereabouts in the Yarra Valley the grapes were grown and under what conditions - whether they were grown on the hill which enjoys direct sunlight, or in the lower parts of the Valley. When they were picked and what the rainfall was like in the year they were grown are all factors that influence the final product.

Chatting after the tasting, Lunn says the importance of regionality is something Australian wine makers are eager to get across to Chinese tastemakers.

"In Australia and Europe we will talk about regionality. In Asia you have to say, 'look, we're from Australia', 'oh, they make wine?' That's the first barrier," says Lunn.


Wine journey

While names like Bourdeux and Champagne are familiar to even the most casual of wine drinkers, Australian wines from the Yarra Valley is making inroads into the Chinese market. Belle Taylor reports.

Winemaker Willy Lunn is holding court in the Writers Room at Beijing's Raffles hotel. A chandelier sparkles overhead, a piano tinkles in the background, but all eyes are on the Australian in blue jeans and an open collar shirt, who looks like he'd be more at home by the farm gate than in a swish hotel.

"It's what I like to call a wine journey," Lunn tells the table of wine and lifestyle journalists clutching glasses of Yering Station Estate Pinot Noir.

"The wines should taste like where they were grown, not like who they were made by," he continues, as the journalists, all wine and lifestyle reporters, sniff, sip and spit the Pinot, a delicate wine with plum and black cherry flavors, which pair well with duck.

Lunn's "wine journey" takes place in the Yarra Valley, about an hour's drive from Melbourne in the Australian state of Victoria. It's a cool climate area, perfect for growing Pinot, which Yering Station is famous for.

The tasting at the Raffles not only included the excellent Chardonnay and Pinot produced at the winery - the reserve bottles of which are possibly some of the best examples of the varieties grown in Victoria, but also excellent Shiraz Viogner and Cabernet Sauvingon.

Lunn explains that the wines produced at Yering Station reflect whereabouts in the Yarra Valley the grapes were grown and under what conditions - whether they were grown on the hill which enjoys direct sunlight, or in the lower parts of the Valley. When they were picked and what the rainfall was like in the year they were grown are all factors that influence the final product.

Chatting after the tasting, Lunn says the importance of regionality is something Australian wine makers are eager to get across to Chinese tastemakers.

"In Australia and Europe we will talk about regionality. In Asia you have to say, 'look, we're from Australia', 'oh, they make wine?' That's the first barrier," says Lunn.


Wine journey

While names like Bourdeux and Champagne are familiar to even the most casual of wine drinkers, Australian wines from the Yarra Valley is making inroads into the Chinese market. Belle Taylor reports.

Winemaker Willy Lunn is holding court in the Writers Room at Beijing's Raffles hotel. A chandelier sparkles overhead, a piano tinkles in the background, but all eyes are on the Australian in blue jeans and an open collar shirt, who looks like he'd be more at home by the farm gate than in a swish hotel.

"It's what I like to call a wine journey," Lunn tells the table of wine and lifestyle journalists clutching glasses of Yering Station Estate Pinot Noir.

"The wines should taste like where they were grown, not like who they were made by," he continues, as the journalists, all wine and lifestyle reporters, sniff, sip and spit the Pinot, a delicate wine with plum and black cherry flavors, which pair well with duck.

Lunn's "wine journey" takes place in the Yarra Valley, about an hour's drive from Melbourne in the Australian state of Victoria. It's a cool climate area, perfect for growing Pinot, which Yering Station is famous for.

The tasting at the Raffles not only included the excellent Chardonnay and Pinot produced at the winery - the reserve bottles of which are possibly some of the best examples of the varieties grown in Victoria, but also excellent Shiraz Viogner and Cabernet Sauvingon.

Lunn explains that the wines produced at Yering Station reflect whereabouts in the Yarra Valley the grapes were grown and under what conditions - whether they were grown on the hill which enjoys direct sunlight, or in the lower parts of the Valley. When they were picked and what the rainfall was like in the year they were grown are all factors that influence the final product.

Chatting after the tasting, Lunn says the importance of regionality is something Australian wine makers are eager to get across to Chinese tastemakers.

"In Australia and Europe we will talk about regionality. In Asia you have to say, 'look, we're from Australia', 'oh, they make wine?' That's the first barrier," says Lunn.


Wine journey

While names like Bourdeux and Champagne are familiar to even the most casual of wine drinkers, Australian wines from the Yarra Valley is making inroads into the Chinese market. Belle Taylor reports.

Winemaker Willy Lunn is holding court in the Writers Room at Beijing's Raffles hotel. A chandelier sparkles overhead, a piano tinkles in the background, but all eyes are on the Australian in blue jeans and an open collar shirt, who looks like he'd be more at home by the farm gate than in a swish hotel.

"It's what I like to call a wine journey," Lunn tells the table of wine and lifestyle journalists clutching glasses of Yering Station Estate Pinot Noir.

"The wines should taste like where they were grown, not like who they were made by," he continues, as the journalists, all wine and lifestyle reporters, sniff, sip and spit the Pinot, a delicate wine with plum and black cherry flavors, which pair well with duck.

Lunn's "wine journey" takes place in the Yarra Valley, about an hour's drive from Melbourne in the Australian state of Victoria. It's a cool climate area, perfect for growing Pinot, which Yering Station is famous for.

The tasting at the Raffles not only included the excellent Chardonnay and Pinot produced at the winery - the reserve bottles of which are possibly some of the best examples of the varieties grown in Victoria, but also excellent Shiraz Viogner and Cabernet Sauvingon.

Lunn explains that the wines produced at Yering Station reflect whereabouts in the Yarra Valley the grapes were grown and under what conditions - whether they were grown on the hill which enjoys direct sunlight, or in the lower parts of the Valley. When they were picked and what the rainfall was like in the year they were grown are all factors that influence the final product.

Chatting after the tasting, Lunn says the importance of regionality is something Australian wine makers are eager to get across to Chinese tastemakers.

"In Australia and Europe we will talk about regionality. In Asia you have to say, 'look, we're from Australia', 'oh, they make wine?' That's the first barrier," says Lunn.


Wine journey

While names like Bourdeux and Champagne are familiar to even the most casual of wine drinkers, Australian wines from the Yarra Valley is making inroads into the Chinese market. Belle Taylor reports.

Winemaker Willy Lunn is holding court in the Writers Room at Beijing's Raffles hotel. A chandelier sparkles overhead, a piano tinkles in the background, but all eyes are on the Australian in blue jeans and an open collar shirt, who looks like he'd be more at home by the farm gate than in a swish hotel.

"It's what I like to call a wine journey," Lunn tells the table of wine and lifestyle journalists clutching glasses of Yering Station Estate Pinot Noir.

"The wines should taste like where they were grown, not like who they were made by," he continues, as the journalists, all wine and lifestyle reporters, sniff, sip and spit the Pinot, a delicate wine with plum and black cherry flavors, which pair well with duck.

Lunn's "wine journey" takes place in the Yarra Valley, about an hour's drive from Melbourne in the Australian state of Victoria. It's a cool climate area, perfect for growing Pinot, which Yering Station is famous for.

The tasting at the Raffles not only included the excellent Chardonnay and Pinot produced at the winery - the reserve bottles of which are possibly some of the best examples of the varieties grown in Victoria, but also excellent Shiraz Viogner and Cabernet Sauvingon.

Lunn explains that the wines produced at Yering Station reflect whereabouts in the Yarra Valley the grapes were grown and under what conditions - whether they were grown on the hill which enjoys direct sunlight, or in the lower parts of the Valley. When they were picked and what the rainfall was like in the year they were grown are all factors that influence the final product.

Chatting after the tasting, Lunn says the importance of regionality is something Australian wine makers are eager to get across to Chinese tastemakers.

"In Australia and Europe we will talk about regionality. In Asia you have to say, 'look, we're from Australia', 'oh, they make wine?' That's the first barrier," says Lunn.


Wine journey

While names like Bourdeux and Champagne are familiar to even the most casual of wine drinkers, Australian wines from the Yarra Valley is making inroads into the Chinese market. Belle Taylor reports.

Winemaker Willy Lunn is holding court in the Writers Room at Beijing's Raffles hotel. A chandelier sparkles overhead, a piano tinkles in the background, but all eyes are on the Australian in blue jeans and an open collar shirt, who looks like he'd be more at home by the farm gate than in a swish hotel.

"It's what I like to call a wine journey," Lunn tells the table of wine and lifestyle journalists clutching glasses of Yering Station Estate Pinot Noir.

"The wines should taste like where they were grown, not like who they were made by," he continues, as the journalists, all wine and lifestyle reporters, sniff, sip and spit the Pinot, a delicate wine with plum and black cherry flavors, which pair well with duck.

Lunn's "wine journey" takes place in the Yarra Valley, about an hour's drive from Melbourne in the Australian state of Victoria. It's a cool climate area, perfect for growing Pinot, which Yering Station is famous for.

The tasting at the Raffles not only included the excellent Chardonnay and Pinot produced at the winery - the reserve bottles of which are possibly some of the best examples of the varieties grown in Victoria, but also excellent Shiraz Viogner and Cabernet Sauvingon.

Lunn explains that the wines produced at Yering Station reflect whereabouts in the Yarra Valley the grapes were grown and under what conditions - whether they were grown on the hill which enjoys direct sunlight, or in the lower parts of the Valley. When they were picked and what the rainfall was like in the year they were grown are all factors that influence the final product.

Chatting after the tasting, Lunn says the importance of regionality is something Australian wine makers are eager to get across to Chinese tastemakers.

"In Australia and Europe we will talk about regionality. In Asia you have to say, 'look, we're from Australia', 'oh, they make wine?' That's the first barrier," says Lunn.


Wine journey

While names like Bourdeux and Champagne are familiar to even the most casual of wine drinkers, Australian wines from the Yarra Valley is making inroads into the Chinese market. Belle Taylor reports.

Winemaker Willy Lunn is holding court in the Writers Room at Beijing's Raffles hotel. A chandelier sparkles overhead, a piano tinkles in the background, but all eyes are on the Australian in blue jeans and an open collar shirt, who looks like he'd be more at home by the farm gate than in a swish hotel.

"It's what I like to call a wine journey," Lunn tells the table of wine and lifestyle journalists clutching glasses of Yering Station Estate Pinot Noir.

"The wines should taste like where they were grown, not like who they were made by," he continues, as the journalists, all wine and lifestyle reporters, sniff, sip and spit the Pinot, a delicate wine with plum and black cherry flavors, which pair well with duck.

Lunn's "wine journey" takes place in the Yarra Valley, about an hour's drive from Melbourne in the Australian state of Victoria. It's a cool climate area, perfect for growing Pinot, which Yering Station is famous for.

The tasting at the Raffles not only included the excellent Chardonnay and Pinot produced at the winery - the reserve bottles of which are possibly some of the best examples of the varieties grown in Victoria, but also excellent Shiraz Viogner and Cabernet Sauvingon.

Lunn explains that the wines produced at Yering Station reflect whereabouts in the Yarra Valley the grapes were grown and under what conditions - whether they were grown on the hill which enjoys direct sunlight, or in the lower parts of the Valley. When they were picked and what the rainfall was like in the year they were grown are all factors that influence the final product.

Chatting after the tasting, Lunn says the importance of regionality is something Australian wine makers are eager to get across to Chinese tastemakers.

"In Australia and Europe we will talk about regionality. In Asia you have to say, 'look, we're from Australia', 'oh, they make wine?' That's the first barrier," says Lunn.


Wine journey

While names like Bourdeux and Champagne are familiar to even the most casual of wine drinkers, Australian wines from the Yarra Valley is making inroads into the Chinese market. Belle Taylor reports.

Winemaker Willy Lunn is holding court in the Writers Room at Beijing's Raffles hotel. A chandelier sparkles overhead, a piano tinkles in the background, but all eyes are on the Australian in blue jeans and an open collar shirt, who looks like he'd be more at home by the farm gate than in a swish hotel.

"It's what I like to call a wine journey," Lunn tells the table of wine and lifestyle journalists clutching glasses of Yering Station Estate Pinot Noir.

"The wines should taste like where they were grown, not like who they were made by," he continues, as the journalists, all wine and lifestyle reporters, sniff, sip and spit the Pinot, a delicate wine with plum and black cherry flavors, which pair well with duck.

Lunn's "wine journey" takes place in the Yarra Valley, about an hour's drive from Melbourne in the Australian state of Victoria. It's a cool climate area, perfect for growing Pinot, which Yering Station is famous for.

The tasting at the Raffles not only included the excellent Chardonnay and Pinot produced at the winery - the reserve bottles of which are possibly some of the best examples of the varieties grown in Victoria, but also excellent Shiraz Viogner and Cabernet Sauvingon.

Lunn explains that the wines produced at Yering Station reflect whereabouts in the Yarra Valley the grapes were grown and under what conditions - whether they were grown on the hill which enjoys direct sunlight, or in the lower parts of the Valley. When they were picked and what the rainfall was like in the year they were grown are all factors that influence the final product.

Chatting after the tasting, Lunn says the importance of regionality is something Australian wine makers are eager to get across to Chinese tastemakers.

"In Australia and Europe we will talk about regionality. In Asia you have to say, 'look, we're from Australia', 'oh, they make wine?' That's the first barrier," says Lunn.


Wine journey

While names like Bourdeux and Champagne are familiar to even the most casual of wine drinkers, Australian wines from the Yarra Valley is making inroads into the Chinese market. Belle Taylor reports.

Winemaker Willy Lunn is holding court in the Writers Room at Beijing's Raffles hotel. A chandelier sparkles overhead, a piano tinkles in the background, but all eyes are on the Australian in blue jeans and an open collar shirt, who looks like he'd be more at home by the farm gate than in a swish hotel.

"It's what I like to call a wine journey," Lunn tells the table of wine and lifestyle journalists clutching glasses of Yering Station Estate Pinot Noir.

"The wines should taste like where they were grown, not like who they were made by," he continues, as the journalists, all wine and lifestyle reporters, sniff, sip and spit the Pinot, a delicate wine with plum and black cherry flavors, which pair well with duck.

Lunn's "wine journey" takes place in the Yarra Valley, about an hour's drive from Melbourne in the Australian state of Victoria. It's a cool climate area, perfect for growing Pinot, which Yering Station is famous for.

The tasting at the Raffles not only included the excellent Chardonnay and Pinot produced at the winery - the reserve bottles of which are possibly some of the best examples of the varieties grown in Victoria, but also excellent Shiraz Viogner and Cabernet Sauvingon.

Lunn explains that the wines produced at Yering Station reflect whereabouts in the Yarra Valley the grapes were grown and under what conditions - whether they were grown on the hill which enjoys direct sunlight, or in the lower parts of the Valley. When they were picked and what the rainfall was like in the year they were grown are all factors that influence the final product.

Chatting after the tasting, Lunn says the importance of regionality is something Australian wine makers are eager to get across to Chinese tastemakers.

"In Australia and Europe we will talk about regionality. In Asia you have to say, 'look, we're from Australia', 'oh, they make wine?' That's the first barrier," says Lunn.



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