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Coca-Cola's New Plan: Defend Aspartame

Coca-Cola's New Plan: Defend Aspartame


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New ads set to roll out this week defend the safety of aspartame, and in turn, diet sodas

Many believe the new ads come at a time when Coca-Cola (and other soda companies) feel backed into a corner by critics who say soda is to blame for rising obesity rates.

Well, here's one way to try to boost sales: say that diet sodas are good for you. That's what Coca-Cola is trying out in a series of new advertisements, reports the Associated Press, in an effort to boost declining soda and diet soda sales.

These new ads, scheduled to run in USA Today (in its Atlanta markets) and the Chicago Tribune, not only stress the safety of aspartame, a hotly debated ingredient found in Diet Coke and other diet drinks, but also say diet sodas can help people manage their weight. Many believe the new ads come at a time when Coca-Cola (and other soda companies) feel backed into a corner by critics who say soda is to blame for rising obesity rates. Meanwhile, diet soda sales are dropping, but why? Many say that despite numerous studies saying aspartame is safe to consume as a sweetener, consumers are still wary of it.

The ads are only one part of Coca-Cola's initiative to raise awareness of aspartame; future plans include more free webinars for dietitians and "online resources" for health care professionals. Still, is touting the wonderful benefits of aspartame a little too self-promoting for the company? Time will tell if its newest health initiative will work.


Coke to defend safety of aspartame in new ad

Coca-Cola plans to run its first ad defending the safety of artificial sweeteners on Wednesday, a move that comes as the company looks to stem declining sales of diet soft drinks.

The print ad is set to run in USA Today in the Atlanta area where Coke is headquartered, followed by the Atlanta Journal Constitution on Thursday and the Chicago Tribune next week. It says that diet drinks can help people manage their weight and stresses the scientific evidence showing the safety of aspartame, which is more commonly known under the NutraSweet brand name.

The ad represents the next phase of a campaign Coca-Cola Co. launched in January to push back at critics who blame its sugary drinks for fueling obesity rates. The first wave of ads outlined the company's commitment to fighting obesity and pointed to the many diet options it offers. Now Coca-Cola is trying to reassure people that those lower-calorie drinks aren't harmful.

"Coke is trying to get out front and proactively defend these diet sweeteners," said John Sicher, editor of Beverage Digest, which tracks the industry.

Diet drinks fade in popularity

The fading popularity of soft drinks in the U.S. has been a long-running trend, given worries that the sugary fizz makes people fat. But more recently, people have been pulling back on diet soda as well, signalling that concerns about soda go beyond just weight gain.

In fact, sales of diet sodas are falling at a faster rate than regular sodas in the U.S., according to Beverage Digest. Last year, for example, sales volume for Coke fell 1 per cent, while Diet Coke fell 3 per cent. Pepsi fell 3.4 per cent, while Diet Pepsi fell 6.2 per cent.

The declines come even though the Food and Drug Administration says aspartame may be safely used in foods as a sweetener, and the ingredient can be found in a wide array of other type of drinks and foods. The American Cancer Society also notes that most studies using people have found that aspartame is not linked to an increased risk of cancer, including the largest study on the topic.

People look for more natural ingredients

Still, some feel there may be effects from consuming large quantities of artificial sweeteners over a lifetime that haven't been detected. Artificial ingredients in general are also falling out of favour as people increasingly move toward organic and natural ingredients.

"Even if (aspartame is) 100 per cent safe to use, it's still problematic from a nutrition standpoint," said Andy Bellatti, a registered dietitian based in Las Vegas who is critical of the food industry's marketing practices.

Bellatti noted that foods and drinks aren't good for people just because they don't have any calories or have been shown to be safe. He added that ingredients such as aspartame only keep people hooked on sweets over more wholesome choices.

In a nod to the various concerns over artificial sweeteners, Coca-Cola and rival PepsiCo Inc. are also working to come up with a drink that uses natural, low-calorie sweeteners.

This summer, Coca-Cola rolled out a version of its namesake soda sweetened with stevia in Argentina, a smaller market where it can better gauge how the drink performs. Stevia comes from a plant of the same name.

Ad softpedals aspartame message

Notably, Coca-Cola's ad softpedals the fact that it is about artificial sweeteners, a sign that the company wants to be cautious about a sensitive topic. The ad features a picture of two women under the heading "Quality products you can always feel good about," with several paragraphs of text underneath. "Time and again, these low- and no-calorie sweeteners have shown to be safe, high-quality alternatives to sugar," it states.

Caren Pasquale Seckler, vice-president of social commitment at Coca-Cola, said the goal is to clear up the confusion around diet sweeteners. She said the company will gauge the response in Atlanta and Chicago before expanding the push.

"This is a beginning and it's a learning process, but we do have plans to do more," she said.

In the meantime, the broader "Coming Together" campaign that began in January is only part of Coca-Cola's push to protect its image from a growing chorus of critics.

Earlier this month, for example, the company distributed a fact sheet on aspartame to its bottlers noting that the sweetener is used in thousands of products including gum, pudding and desserts.

The "Skinny on Aspartame" document is also posted on the website of the "Beverage Institute for Health & Wellness," an online resource Coca-Cola set up for health care professionals.

Webinars for dietitians

Rhona Applebaum, chief science and health officer at Coca-Cola, said the company plans to increase the free webinars the site provides for registered dietitians and other health care professionals who want to earn continuing education credits to maintain their professional licenses.

She said some of the experts the company selects to conduct the webinars are paid but stressed that the course materials are based on independent, objective research.

Some say it's inherently flawed to have food and beverage companies trying to educate people about nutrition. In fact, Bellatti is pushing to have the professional group for dietitians cut its ties with the industry.

"If you're Coca-Cola, you have a vested interest in defending your product line," he said.


Coca-Cola plans limited-time comeback for New Coke

ATLANTA — The Coca-Cola Co. has teamed up with Netflix and the series “Stranger Things” to bring back New Coke, a beverage that only lasted 79 days back in 1985 before it was shelved and the company returned to its original Coca-Cola formula.

The re-release of New Coke is expected to be even shorter than the original release of the beverage. Beginning May 23, New Coke featuring the same recipe from 1985 will be available as part of a bundle that includes two New Coke cans along with a limited-edition and numbered Stranger Things/Coca-Cola and Coke Zero Sugar 8-oz glass bottle at https://www.cokestore.com/1985.

The first season of “Stranger Things” debuted in 2016, and since that time the series’ producers have weaved the Coca-Cola brand into the show’s storyline through products, advertisements and logos more than a dozen times. The third season of “Stranger Things” is set in 1985, the year New Coke was launched.

Geoff Cottrill, senior vice-president of strategic marketing for Coca-Cola North America, said the company is excited to partner with Netflix and play a key role in “recreating the summer of 1985 in a uniquely Coca-Cola Way.”

“In a world of shifting media consumption, we continue to challenge ourselves to find creative and meaningful ways to participate in non-advertising platforms like Netflix to engage with the millions of fans who subscribe to streaming content services,” Mr. Cottrill said.

Peter Shoemaker, director of sparkling category commercialization for Coca-Cola North America, said it took the company about six months to source all the ingredients and approvals needed to produce New Coke concentrate and then to coordinate the production and packaging process with several stakeholders throughout the Coca-Cola system.

“The partnership with Coke gives Netflix the opportunity to reach a massive audience via one of the most recognizable brands in the world in a deeply authentic way,” said Barry Smyth, head of global partner marketing, Netflix. “It also gives ‘Stranger Things’ fans the chance to expand their engagement with the show into their lives like never before.”


Coke to defend safety of aspartame in new ad

NEW YORK Coca-Cola plans to run its first ad defending the safety of artificial sweeteners on Wednesday, a move that comes as the company looks to stem declining sales of diet soda.

The print ad is set to run in USA Today in the Atlanta area, followed by the Atlanta Journal Constitution on Thursday and the Chicago Tribune next week. It says that diet drinks can help people manage their weight and stresses the scientific evidence showing the safety of aspartame, which is more commonly known under the NutraSweet brand name.

The ad represents the next phase of a campaign Coca-Cola Co. launched in January to push back at critics who blame its sugary drinks for fueling obesity rates. The first wave of ads outlined the company's commitment to fighting obesity and pointed to the many diet options it offers. Now Coca-Cola is trying to reassure people that those lower-calorie drinks aren't harmful.

"Coke is trying to get out front and proactively defend these diet sweeteners," said John Sicher, editor of Beverage Digest, which tracks the industry.

The fading popularity of soft drinks in the U.S. has been a long-running trend, given worries that the sugary fizz makes people fat. But more recently, people have been pulling back on diet soda as well, signaling that concerns about soda go beyond weight gain.

In fact, sales of diet sodas are falling at a faster rate than regular sodas in the U.S., according to Beverage Digest. Last year, for example, sales volume for Coke fell 1 percent, while Diet Coke fell 3 percent. Pepsi fell 3.4 percent, while Diet Pepsi fell 6.2 percent.

The declines come even though the Food and Drug Administration says aspartame may be safely used in foods as a sweetener, and the ingredient can be found in a wide array of other type of drinks and foods. The American Cancer Society also notes that most studies using people have found that aspartame is not linked to an increased risk of cancer, including the largest study on the topic.

Still, some feel there may be effects from consuming large quantities of artificial sweeteners over a lifetime that haven't been detected. Artificial ingredients in general are also falling out of favor as people increasingly move toward organic and natural ingredients.

"Even if (aspartame is) 100 percent safe to use, it's still problematic from a nutrition standpoint," said Andy Bellatti, a registered dietitian based in Las Vegas who is critical of the food industry's marketing practices.

Bellatti noted that foods and drinks aren't good for people just because they don't have any calories or have been shown to be safe. He added that ingredients such as aspartame only keep people hooked on sweets over more wholesome choices.

In a nod to the various concerns over artificial sweeteners, Coca-Cola and rival PepsiCo Inc. are also working to come up with a drink that uses natural, low-calorie sweeteners.

This summer, Coca-Cola rolled out a version of its namesake soda sweetened with stevia in Argentina, a smaller market where it can better gauge how the drink performs. Stevia comes from a plant of the same name.

Notably, Coca-Cola's ad softpedals the fact that it is about artificial sweeteners, a sign that the company wants to be cautious about a sensitive topic. The ad features a picture of two women under the heading "Quality products you can always feel good about," with several paragraphs of text underneath. "Time and again, these low- and no-calorie sweeteners have shown to be safe, high-quality alternatives to sugar," it states.

Caren Pasquale Seckler, vice president of social commitment at Coca-Cola, said the goal is to clear up the confusion around diet sweeteners. She said the company will gauge the response in Atlanta and Chicago before expanding the push.

"This is a beginning and it's a learning process, but we do have plans to do more," she said.

In the meantime, the broader "Coming Together" campaign that began in January is only part of Coca-Cola's push to protect its image from a growing chorus of critics.

Earlier this month, for example, the company distributed a fact sheet on aspartame to its bottlers noting that the sweetener is used in thousands of products including gum, pudding and desserts.

The "Skinny on Aspartame" document is also posted on the website of the "Beverage Institute for Health & Wellness," an online resource Coca-Cola set up for health care professionals.

Rhona Applebaum, chief science and health officer at Coca-Cola, said the company plans to increase the free webinars the site provides for registered dietitians and other health care professionals who want to earn continuing education credits to maintain their professional licenses.

She said some of the experts the company selects to conduct the webinars are paid but stressed that the course materials are based on independent, objective research.

Some say it's inherently flawed to have food and beverage companies trying to educate people about nutrition. In fact, Bellatti is pushing to have the professional group for dietitians cut its ties with the industry.

"If you're Coca-Cola, you have a vested interest in defending your product line," he said.

First published on August 14, 2013 / 11:48 AM

© 2013 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


Coke to defend safety of aspartame in new ad

NEW YORK &mdash Coca-Cola plans to run its first ad defending the safety of artificial sweeteners on Wednesday, a move that comes as the company looks to stem declining sales of diet soda.

The print ad is set to run in USA Today in the Atlanta area, followed by the Atlanta Journal Constitution on Thursday and the Chicago Tribune next week. It says that diet drinks can help people manage their weight and stresses the scientific evidence showing the safety of aspartame, which is more commonly known under the NutraSweet brand name.

The ad represents the next phase of a campaign Coca-Cola Co. launched in January to push back at critics who blame its sugary drinks for fueling obesity rates. The first wave of ads outlined the company's commitment to fighting obesity and pointed to the many diet options it offers. Now Coca-Cola is trying to reassure people that those lower-calorie drinks aren't harmful.

"Coke is trying to get out front and proactively defend these diet sweeteners," said John Sicher, editor of Beverage Digest, which tracks the industry.

The fading popularity of soft drinks in the U.S. has been a long-running trend, given worries that the sugary fizz makes people fat. But more recently, people have been pulling back on diet soda as well, signaling that concerns about soda go beyond weight gain.

In fact, sales of diet sodas are falling at a faster rate than regular sodas in the U.S., according to Beverage Digest. Last year, for example, sales volume for Coke fell 1 percent, while Diet Coke fell 3 percent. Pepsi fell 3.4 percent, while Diet Pepsi fell 6.2 percent.

The declines come even though the Food and Drug Administration says aspartame may be safely used in foods as a sweetener, and the ingredient can be found in a wide array of other type of drinks and foods. The American Cancer Society also notes that most studies using people have found that aspartame is not linked to an increased risk of cancer, including the largest study on the topic.

Still, some feel there may be effects from consuming large quantities of artificial sweeteners over a lifetime that haven't been detected. Artificial ingredients in general are also falling out of favor as people increasingly move toward organic and natural ingredients.

"Even if (aspartame is) 100 percent safe to use, it's still problematic from a nutrition standpoint," said Andy Bellatti, a registered dietitian based in Las Vegas who is critical of the food industry's marketing practices.

Bellatti noted that foods and drinks aren't good for people just because they don't have any calories or have been shown to be safe. He added that ingredients such as aspartame only keep people hooked on sweets over more wholesome choices.

In a nod to the various concerns over artificial sweeteners, Coca-Cola and rival PepsiCo Inc. are also working to come up with a drink that uses natural, low-calorie sweeteners.

This summer, Coca-Cola rolled out a version of its namesake soda sweetened with stevia in Argentina, a smaller market where it can better gauge how the drink performs. Stevia comes from a plant of the same name.

Notably, Coca-Cola's ad softpedals the fact that it is about artificial sweeteners, a sign that the company wants to be cautious about a sensitive topic. The ad features a picture of two women under the heading "Quality products you can always feel good about," with several paragraphs of text underneath. "Time and again, these low- and no-calorie sweeteners have shown to be safe, high-quality alternatives to sugar," it states.

Caren Pasquale Seckler, vice president of social commitment at Coca-Cola, said the goal is to clear up the confusion around diet sweeteners. She said the company will gauge the response in Atlanta and Chicago before expanding the push.

"This is a beginning and it's a learning process, but we do have plans to do more," she said.

In the meantime, the broader "Coming Together" campaign that began in January is only part of Coca-Cola's push to protect its image from a growing chorus of critics.

Earlier this month, for example, the company distributed a fact sheet on aspartame to its bottlers noting that the sweetener is used in thousands of products including gum, pudding and desserts.

The "Skinny on Aspartame" document is also posted on the website of the "Beverage Institute for Health & Wellness," an online resource Coca-Cola set up for health care professionals.

Rhona Applebaum, chief science and health officer at Coca-Cola, said the company plans to increase the free webinars the site provides for registered dietitians and other health care professionals who want to earn continuing education credits to maintain their professional licenses.

She said some of the experts the company selects to conduct the webinars are paid but stressed that the course materials are based on independent, objective research.

Some say it's inherently flawed to have food and beverage companies trying to educate people about nutrition. In fact, Bellatti is pushing to have the professional group for dietitians cut its ties with the industry.

"If you're Coca-Cola, you have a vested interest in defending your product line," he said.


Coke to defend safety of aspartame in new ad

NEW YORK (AP) — Coca-Cola plans to run its first ad defending the safety of artificial sweeteners on Wednesday, a move that comes as the company looks to stem declining sales of diet soda.

The print ad is set to run in USA Today in the Atlanta area, followed by the Atlanta Journal Constitution on Thursday and the Chicago Tribune next week. It says that diet drinks can help people manage their weight and stresses the scientific evidence showing the safety of aspartame, which is more commonly known under the NutraSweet brand name.

The ad represents the next phase of a campaign Coca-Cola Co. launched in January to push back at critics who blame its sugary drinks for fueling obesity rates. The first wave of ads outlined the company's commitment to fighting obesity and pointed to the many diet options it offers. Now Coca-Cola is trying to reassure people that those lower-calorie drinks aren't harmful.

"Coke is trying to get out front and proactively defend these diet sweeteners," said John Sicher, editor of Beverage Digest, which tracks the industry.

The fading popularity of soft drinks in the U.S. has been a long-running trend, given worries that the sugary fizz makes people fat. But more recently, people have been pulling back on diet soda as well, signaling that concerns about soda go beyond weight gain.

In fact, sales of diet sodas are falling at a faster rate than regular sodas in the U.S., according to Beverage Digest. Last year, for example, sales volume for Coke fell 1 percent, while Diet Coke fell 3 percent. Pepsi fell 3.4 percent, while Diet Pepsi fell 6.2 percent.

The declines come even though the Food and Drug Administration says aspartame may be safely used in foods as a sweetener, and the ingredient can be found in a wide array of other type of drinks and foods. The American Cancer Society also notes that most studies using people have found that aspartame is not linked to an increased risk of cancer, including the largest study on the topic.

Still, some feel there may be effects from consuming large quantities of artificial sweeteners over a lifetime that haven't been detected. Artificial ingredients in general are also falling out of favor as people increasingly move toward organic and natural ingredients.

"Even if (aspartame is) 100 percent safe to use, it's still problematic from a nutrition standpoint," said Andy Bellatti, a registered dietitian based in Las Vegas who is critical of the food industry's marketing practices.

Bellatti noted that foods and drinks aren't good for people just because they don't have any calories or have been shown to be safe. He added that ingredients such as aspartame only keep people hooked on sweets over more wholesome choices.

In a nod to the various concerns over artificial sweeteners, Coca-Cola and rival PepsiCo Inc. are also working to come up with a drink that uses natural, low-calorie sweeteners.

This summer, Coca-Cola rolled out a version of its namesake soda sweetened with stevia in Argentina, a smaller market where it can better gauge how the drink performs. Stevia comes from a plant of the same name.

Notably, Coca-Cola's ad softpedals the fact that it is about artificial sweeteners, a sign that the company wants to be cautious about a sensitive topic. The ad features a picture of two women under the heading "Quality products you can always feel good about," with several paragraphs of text underneath. "Time and again, these low- and no-calorie sweeteners have shown to be safe, high-quality alternatives to sugar," it states.

Caren Pasquale Seckler, vice president of social commitment at Coca-Cola, said the goal is to clear up the confusion around diet sweeteners. She said the company will gauge the response in Atlanta and Chicago before expanding the push.

"This is a beginning and it's a learning process, but we do have plans to do more," she said.

In the meantime, the broader "Coming Together" campaign that began in January is only part of Coca-Cola's push to protect its image from a growing chorus of critics.

Earlier this month, for example, the company distributed a fact sheet on aspartame to its bottlers noting that the sweetener is used in thousands of products including gum, pudding and desserts.

The "Skinny on Aspartame" document is also posted on the website of the "Beverage Institute for Health & Wellness," an online resource Coca-Cola set up for health care professionals.

Rhona Applebaum, chief science and health officer at Coca-Cola, said the company plans to increase the free webinars the site provides for registered dietitians and other health care professionals who want to earn continuing education credits to maintain their professional licenses.

She said some of the experts the company selects to conduct the webinars are paid but stressed that the course materials are based on independent, objective research.

Some say it's inherently flawed to have food and beverage companies trying to educate people about nutrition. In fact, Bellatti is pushing to have the professional group for dietitians cut its ties with the industry.

"If you're Coca-Cola, you have a vested interest in defending your product line," he said.

Follow Candice Choi at www.twitter.com/candicechoi

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New Diet Coke Ad Reassures Consumers About Aspartame Safety

New Diet Coke highlights the benefits, safety of artificial sweeteners.

New Coke Ads Defend Safety of Artificial Sweeteners

Aug. 14, 2013— -- Diet Coke plans to defend its use of artificial sweeteners in a series of new print ads, as part of an effort to reassure consumers about the safety of its products amid sagging sales.

The ad, which will ultimately run nationally, appeared in the print edition of USA Today in the Atlanta region today and then in the Atlantic Journal Constitution on Thursday, company spokesman Ben Sheidler said. Entitled, "Quality Products You Can Always Feel Good About," the ad will highlight the benefits and safety of low-calorie and artificial sweeteners found in the Atlanta-based soft drink giant's beverages.

"Time and again, these low- and no-calorie sweeteners have shown to be safe, high-quality alternatives to sugar," the ad states. "In fact, the safety of aspartame is supported by more than 200 studies over the last 40 years."

Sheidler said that one area often overlooked in discussions about obesity is the benefit of drinking no- and low-calorie beverages. But, he said, the company also understands that people have questions about artificial sweeteners.

"We created this print ad to address their concerns and make it easier for them to get the facts," he said.

Many large public health organizations say the sweeteners have no adverse health effects when used in moderation. The Food and Drug Administration, for example, regards aspartame as a safe food ingredient. The American Cancer Society notes that most studies don't associate aspartame use with an increased risk of cancer. The American Heart Association, The American Diabetes Association and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics all have published position statements supporting the moderate use of artificial sweeteners.

However, not all experts agree that all artificial sweeteners are harmless. The public health advocacy group Center for Science in the Public Interest does not recommend the use of aspartame, a sweetener found in many diet drinks including Diet Coke.

"Three independent studies have found that aspartame causes cancer. These studies, in our view, are superior to earlier, industry-sponsored studies that found it did not cause cancer because they used a larger pool of subjects and a more sensitive protocol," said Lisa Lefferts, senior scientist for CSPI.

By subjects, Lefferts means mice and rats.The vast majority of studies on aspatame, whether for or against, are rodent studies. Diet Coke Is A Potent Alcohol Mixer

Lefferts also noted that some studies found that aspartame can trigger headaches in certain sensitive individuals.

The ad is part of a larger campaign by Coke launched earlier this year to shore up a soft drink business that has seen a 1 percent drop in the sales of Coke and a 3 percent drop in the sales of Diet Coke over the past year, according to Beverage Digest. Ads that ran earlier in the year emphasized the company's commitment to fighting the obesity epidemic by offering a wide variety of diet options, options the new ads defend as trustworthy and beneficial.


Coke to defend safety of aspartame in new ad as diet soda sales drop

Coca-Cola plans to run its first ad defending the safety of artificial sweeteners on Wednesday, a move that comes as the company looks to stem declining sales of diet soda.

The print ad is set to run in USA Today in the Atlanta area, followed by the Atlanta Journal Constitution on Thursday and the Chicago Tribune next week. It says that diet drinks can help people manage their weight and stresses the scientific evidence showing the safety of aspartame, which is more commonly known under the NutraSweet brand name.

The ad represents the next phase of a campaign Coca-Cola Co. launched in January to push back at critics who blame its sugary drinks for fueling obesity rates. The first wave of ads outlined the company's commitment to fighting obesity and pointed to the many diet options it offers. Now Coca-Cola is trying to reassure people that those lower-calorie drinks aren't harmful.

"Coke is trying to get out front and proactively defend these diet sweeteners," said John Sicher, editor of Beverage Digest, which tracks the industry.

The fading popularity of soft drinks in the U.S. has been a long-running trend, given worries that the sugary fizz makes people fat. But more recently, people have been pulling back on diet soda as well, signaling that concerns about soda go beyond weight gain.

In fact, sales of diet sodas are falling at a faster rate than regular sodas in the U.S., according to Beverage Digest. Last year, for example, sales volume for Coke fell 1 percent, while Diet Coke fell 3 percent. Pepsi fell 3.4 percent, while Diet Pepsi fell 6.2 percent.

The declines come even though the Food and Drug Administration says aspartame may be safely used in foods as a sweetener, and the ingredient can be found in a wide array of other type of drinks and foods. The American Cancer Society also notes that most studies using people have found that aspartame is not linked to an increased risk of cancer, including the largest study on the topic.

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Still, some feel there may be effects from consuming large quantities of artificial sweeteners over a lifetime that haven't been detected. Artificial ingredients in general are also falling out of favor as people increasingly move toward organic and natural ingredients.

"Even if (aspartame is) 100 percent safe to use, it's still problematic from a nutrition standpoint," said Andy Bellatti, a registered dietitian based in Las Vegas who is critical of the food industry's marketing practices.

Bellatti noted that foods and drinks aren't good for people just because they don't have any calories or have been shown to be safe. He added that ingredients such as aspartame only keep people hooked on sweets over more wholesome choices.

In a nod to the various concerns over artificial sweeteners, Coca-Cola and rival PepsiCo Inc. are also working to come up with a drink that uses natural, low-calorie sweeteners.

This summer, Coca-Cola rolled out a version of its namesake soda sweetened with stevia in Argentina, a smaller market where it can better gauge how the drink performs. Stevia comes from a plant of the same name.

Notably, Coca-Cola's ad softpedals the fact that it is about artificial sweeteners, a sign that the company wants to be cautious about a sensitive topic. The ad features a picture of two women under the heading "Quality products you can always feel good about," with several paragraphs of text underneath. "Time and again, these low- and no-calorie sweeteners have shown to be safe, high-quality alternatives to sugar," it states.

Caren Pasquale Seckler, vice president of social commitment at Coca-Cola, said the goal is to clear up the confusion around diet sweeteners. She said the company will gauge the response in Atlanta and Chicago before expanding the push.

"This is a beginning and it's a learning process, but we do have plans to do more," she said.

In the meantime, the broader "Coming Together" campaign that began in January is only part of Coca-Cola's push to protect its image from a growing chorus of critics.

Earlier this month, for example, the company distributed a fact sheet on aspartame to its bottlers noting that the sweetener is used in thousands of products including gum, pudding and desserts.

The "Skinny on Aspartame" document is also posted on the website of the "Beverage Institute for Health & Wellness," an online resource Coca-Cola set up for health care professionals.

Rhona Applebaum, chief science and health officer at Coca-Cola, said the company plans to increase the free webinars the site provides for registered dietitians and other health care professionals who want to earn continuing education credits to maintain their professional licenses.

She said some of the experts the company selects to conduct the webinars are paid but stressed that the course materials are based on independent, objective research.

Some say it's inherently flawed to have food and beverage companies trying to educate people about nutrition. In fact, Bellatti is pushing to have the professional group for dietitians cut its ties with the industry.

"If you're Coca-Cola, you have a vested interest in defending your product line," he said.


Coca-Cola to defend safety of aspartame in new ad

NEW YORK, N.Y. — Coca-Cola plans to run its first ad defending the safety of artificial sweeteners on Wednesday, a move that comes as the company looks to stem declining sales of diet soda.

The print ad is set to run in USA Today in the Atlanta area, followed by the Atlanta Journal Constitution on Thursday and the Chicago Tribune next week. It says that diet drinks can help people manage their weight and stresses the scientific evidence showing the safety of aspartame, which is more commonly known under the NutraSweet brand name.

The ad represents the next phase of a campaign Coca-Cola Co. launched in January to push back at critics who blame its sugary drinks for fuelling obesity rates. The first wave of ads outlined the company’s commitment to fighting obesity and pointed to the many diet options it offers. Now Coca-Cola is trying to reassure people that those lower-calorie drinks aren’t harmful.

𠇌oke is trying to get out front and proactively defend these diet sweeteners,” said John Sicher, editor of Beverage Digest, which tracks the industry.

The fading popularity of soft drinks in the U.S. has been a long-running trend, given worries that the sugary fizz makes people fat. But more recently, people have been pulling back on diet soda as well, signalling that concerns about soda go beyond just weight gain.

In fact, sales of diet sodas are falling at a faster rate than regular sodas in the U.S., according to Beverage Digest. Last year, for example, sales volume for Coke fell 1 per cent, while Diet Coke fell 3 per cent. Pepsi fell 3.4 per cent, while Diet Pepsi fell 6.2 per cent.

The declines come even though the Food and Drug Administration says aspartame may be safely used in foods as a sweetener, and the ingredient can be found in a wide array of other type of drinks and foods. The American Cancer Society also notes that most studies using people have found that aspartame is not linked to an increased risk of cancer, including the largest study on the topic.

Still, some feel there may be effects from consuming large quantities of artificial sweeteners over a lifetime that haven’t been detected. Artificial ingredients in general are also falling out of favour as people increasingly move toward organic and natural ingredients.

𠇎ven if (aspartame is) 100 per cent safe to use, it’s still problematic from a nutrition standpoint,” said Andy Bellatti, a registered dietitian based in Las Vegas who is critical of the food industry’s marketing practices.

Bellatti noted that foods and drinks aren’t good for people just because they don’t have any calories or have been shown to be safe. He added that ingredients such as aspartame only keep people hooked on sweets over more wholesome choices.

In a nod to the various concerns over artificial sweeteners, Coca-Cola and rival PepsiCo Inc. are also working to come up with a drink that uses natural, low-calorie sweeteners.

This summer, Coca-Cola rolled out a version of its namesake soda sweetened with stevia in Argentina, a smaller market where it can better gauge how the drink performs. Stevia comes from a plant of the same name.

Notably, Coca-Cola’s ad softpedals the fact that it is about artificial sweeteners, a sign that the company wants to be cautious about a sensitive topic. The ad features a picture of two women under the heading “Quality products you can always feel good about,” with several paragraphs of text underneath. “Time and again, these low- and no-calorie sweeteners have shown to be safe, high-quality alternatives to sugar,” it states.

Caren Pasquale Seckler, vice-president of social commitment at Coca-Cola, said the goal is to clear up the confusion around diet sweeteners. She said the company will gauge the response in Atlanta and Chicago before expanding the push.

“This is a beginning and it’s a learning process, but we do have plans to do more,” she said.

In the meantime, the broader 𠇌oming Together” campaign that began in January is only part of Coca-Cola’s push to protect its image from a growing chorus of critics.

Earlier this month, for example, the company distributed a fact sheet on aspartame to its bottlers noting that the sweetener is used in thousands of products including gum, pudding and desserts.

The “Skinny on Aspartame” document is also posted on the website of the �verage Institute for Health & Wellness,” an online resource Coca-Cola set up for health care professionals.

Rhona Applebaum, chief science and health officer at Coca-Cola, said the company plans to increase the free webinars the site provides for registered dietitians and other health care professionals who want to earn continuing education credits to maintain their professional licenses.

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She said some of the experts the company selects to conduct the webinars are paid but stressed that the course materials are based on independent, objective research.

Some say it’s inherently flawed to have food and beverage companies trying to educate people about nutrition. In fact, Bellatti is pushing to have the professional group for dietitians cut its ties with the industry.

“If you’re Coca-Cola, you have a vested interest in defending your product line,” he said.


Coke to Defend Safety of Aspartame in New Ad

Coca-Cola plans to run its first ad defending the safety of artificial sweeteners on Wednesday, a move that comes as the company looks to stem declining sales of diet soda.

The print ad is set to run in USA Today in the Atlanta area, followed by the Atlanta Journal Constitution on Thursday and the Chicago Tribune next week.

The ad says that diet drinks can help people manage their weight and stresses the scientific evidence showing the safety of aspartame, which is more commonly known under the NutraSweet brand name.

The ad represents the next phase of a campaign Coca-Cola Co. launched in January to push back at critics who blame its sugary drinks for fueling obesity rates. The first wave of ads outlined the company&rsquos commitment to fighting obesity and pointed to the many diet options it offers. Now Coca-Cola is trying to reassure people that those lower-calorie drinks aren&rsquot harmful.

&ldquoCoke is trying to get out front and proactively defend these diet sweeteners,&rdquo said John Sicher, editor of Beverage Digest, which tracks the industry.

The fading popularity of soft drinks in the U.S. has been a long-running trend, given worries that the sugary fizz makes people fat. But more recently, people have been pulling back on diet soda as well, signaling that concerns about soda go beyond weight gain.

In fact, sales of diet sodas are falling at a faster rate than regular sodas in the U.S., according to Beverage Digest. Last year, for example, sales volume for Coke fell 1 percent, while Diet Coke fell 3 percent. Pepsi fell 3.4 percent, while Diet Pepsi fell 6.2 percent.

The declines come even though the Food and Drug Administration says aspartame may be safely used in foods as a sweetener, and the ingredient can be found in a wide array of other type of drinks and foods. The American Cancer Society also notes that most studies using people have found that aspartame is not linked to an increased risk of cancer, including the largest study on the topic.

Still, some feel there may be effects from consuming large quantities of artificial sweeteners over a lifetime that haven&rsquot been detected. Artificial ingredients in general are also falling out of favor as people increasingly move toward organic and natural ingredients.

&ldquoEven if (aspartame is) 100 percent safe to use, it&rsquos still problematic from a nutrition standpoint,&rdquo said Andy Bellatti, a registered dietitian based in Las Vegas who is critical of the food industry&rsquos marketing practices.

Bellatti noted that foods and drinks aren&rsquot good for people just because they don&rsquot have any calories or have been shown to be safe. He added that ingredients such as aspartame only keep people hooked on sweets over more wholesome choices.

In a nod to the various concerns over artificial sweeteners, Coca-Cola and rival PepsiCo Inc. are also working to come up with a drink that uses natural, low-calorie sweeteners.

This summer, Coca-Cola rolled out a version of its namesake soda sweetened with stevia in Ar

w the drink performs. Stevia comes from a plant of the same name.

Notably, Coca-Cola&rsquos ad softpedals the fact that it is about artificial sweeteners, a sign that the company wants to be cautious about a sensitive topic. The ad features a picture of two women under the heading &ldquoQuality products you can always feel good about,&rdquo with several paragraphs of text underneath. &ldquoTime and again, these low- and no-calorie sweeteners have shown to be safe, high-quality alternatives to sugar,&rdquo it states.


Watch the video: Горячие обеды вкуснее c Coca-Cola!


Comments:

  1. Grojinn

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  2. Hariman

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  3. Kajimuro

    do something

  4. Tushakar

    Also that we would do without your magnificent phrase



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