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Piquant pork recipe

Piquant pork recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Meat and poultry
  • Pork
  • Roast pork
  • Pork loin

Want something a little different for your Sunday roast? Look no further. This dish is delicious and adds a bit of 'zing' to boring old pork.

5 people made this

IngredientsServes: 6

  • 1 pork loin
  • 2 teaspoons prepared English mustard
  • 1 large tin pineapple rings in juice
  • 200g golden syrup
  • 1 splash vinegar
  • 1/4 teaspoon white pepper
  • 500ml warm water
  • 1 stock cube
  • 1/2 tablespoon redcurrant or plum jelly
  • 1 handful plain flour

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:3hr ›Ready in:3hr15min

  1. Preheat the oven to 190 C / Gas 5.
  2. Put the loin of pork in a self basting oven tin or large casserole dish and brush the mustard over the meat so that it is fully covered.
  3. Drain the tin of pineapple and reserve the juice. Mix together the pineapple juice, golden syrup, vinegar, white pepper and the water. Stir thoroughly and pour in to the dish with the meat. Cover.
  4. Roast for approx 3 hours at 190 C / Gas 5 until meat is tender. Baste the meat with the juice every 30 minutes throughout cooking. 30 to 40 minutes before cooking time is up, remove the lid and allow the meat to brown and the juice to darken, but not burn.
  5. Cook until the centre of the loin is no longer pink and the juices run clear. Transfer the meat to a plate and keep warm.
  6. Move your oven tin to the hob over a medium heat. Add a little boiling water to the tin and crumble in the stock cube and the jelly jam, stirring constantly. Whisk in the flour to thicken and add more boiled water as needed to get the desired consistency. Simmer for 10 to 15 minutes to cook out the flour. Chop the pineapple rings then add to the gravy. Serve the pork loin sliced and the gravy in a gravy boat on the side.

Tip

If you don't feel confident enough to work the flour in to thicken the sauce, most supermarkets stock thickening granules which can be found in the bakery aisle or with the gravy granules.

Recently viewed

Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(1)

Reviews in English (1)

Was good. Little bit sweet but with some tweaking would be less so-31 May 2015


Pork Vindaloo For Leftover Pork Recipe

To many of us Brits, 'Vindaloo' means hot, hot, HOT its reputation as a curry which requires a degree of masochism in consuming it, due to its eye-watering, fiery hot, chilli content, goes before it. In actual fact 'Vindaloo' comes from Goa, India, and the name derives from a Portuguese dish, Carne de Vinha d' Alhos (my apologies if I have spelled it wrong), a meat dish made with wine and garlic. Read more Vindaloo is indeed a hot curry, but also piquant and aromatic through the addition of vinegar (instead of wine) and varied spices. I have adapted a couple of recipes I have had for ages, for use with leftover roast pork, and added a couple of twists of my own. Contrary to the usual recipes, I made this very mild, for although I am a chilli-head my husband is not. I served this over my foolproof plain fluffy Basmati rice, which is also described below. See less

  • leftover
  • spicy
  • curry
  • hot
  • chilli
  • piquant
  • garlic
  • indian
  • goan
  • pork
  • leftover
  • spicy
  • curry
  • hot
  • chilli
  • piquant
  • garlic
  • indian
  • goan
  • pork
  • stovetop
  • indian
  • leftover
  • spicy
  • curry
  • hot
  • chilli
  • piquant
  • garlic
  • indian
  • goan
  • pork
  • leftover
  • spicy
  • curry
  • hot
  • chilli
  • piquant
  • garlic
  • indian
  • goan
  • pork
  • stovetop
  • indian

Schedule your weekly meals and get auto-generated shopping lists.

  • 1½- 1¾ lbs. leftover pork, or a little more if you have it, trimmed and cut into 1" cubes (I had roasted a large piece of boneless leg the night before)
  • 2 tbsps. flour
  • 2 tsps. ground cumin
  • 1½ tsps. ground coriander
  • 1½ tsps. turmeric
  • ¾ tsp. ground cardamom
  • ¼ tsp. ground cinnamon
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • ¼ tsp. black pepper
  • a pinch of ground cloves
  • 2-3 tbsps. neutral-flavoured oil such as groundnut
  • 2 large onions, finely chopped
  • 6-7 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tbsp. ginger, minced
  • ¼ tsp. cayenne pepper (you could add thinly-sliced chillis to your taste at this stage, if you wanted more heat)
  • 1 tbsp. grainy mustard
  • 2 tbsps. white vinegar (I used white wine vinegar as that’s what I had)
  • 1 heaped tsp. brown sugar
  • about 3-4 tbsps. butter or oil (I used soya margarine), more if necessary
  • 2 cups chicken stock, and more to thin the sauce if need be
  • 2 tbsps. white vinegar
  • about half a 14-oz. can coconut milk (shake well before opening)
  • a small can of pineapple slices (in juice, not syrup)
  • 1½ cups uncooked Basmati rice
  • plenty of boiling water

Ingredients

  • 1½- 1¾ lbs. leftover pork, or a little more if you have it, trimmed and cut into 1" cubes (I had roasted a large piece of boneless leg the night before) shopping list
  • 2 tbsps. flourshopping list
  • 2 tsps. ground cuminshopping list
  • 1½ tsps. ground coriandershopping list
  • 1½ tsps. turmericshopping list
  • ¾ tsp. ground cardamomshopping list
  • ¼ tsp. ground cinnamonshopping list
  • ½ tsp. saltshopping list
  • ¼ tsp. black peppershopping list
  • a pinch of ground clovesshopping list
  • 2-3 tbsps. neutral-flavoured oil such as groundnut shopping list
  • 2 large onions, finely chopped shopping list
  • 6-7 clovesgarlic, minced shopping list
  • 1 tbsp. ginger, minced shopping list
  • ¼ tsp. cayenne pepper (you could add thinly-sliced chillis to your taste at this stage, if you wanted more heat) shopping list
  • 1 tbsp. grainy mustardshopping list
  • 2 tbsps. white vinegar (I used white wine vinegar as that’s what I had) shopping list
  • 1 heaped tsp. brown sugarshopping list
  • about 3-4 tbsps. butter or oil (I used soya margarine), more if necessary shopping list
  • 2 cups chicken stock, and more to thin the sauce if need be shopping list
  • 2 tbsps. white vinegarshopping list
  • about half a 14-oz. can coconut milk (shake well before opening) shopping list
  • a small can of pineapple slices (in juice, not syrup) shopping list
  • 1½ cups uncooked basmati riceshopping list
  • plenty of boiling watershopping list

How to make it

  • Place the cubed pork in a large bowl. See Photo
  • In a smaller bowl, combine the flour, cumin, coriander, turmeric, cardamom, cinnamon, salt, black pepper and cloves.
  • Add the spice mixture little by little to the pork in the large bowl and toss, coating the meat well See Photo. Set aside.
  • In a large, lidded pan, heat the oil.
  • Add the onions, stir until they are well heated and coated with oil, fry gently for a few minutes and then cover and cook on a low heat, stirring occasionally, for about 30-35 minutes until onions are soft but not browned See Photo. Turn up the heat a little, uncover, and cook more briskly, stirring a lot, until the onions start to take on a golden colour, about 15 minutes. Be careful not to burn.
  • Add the garlic, ginger and cayenne (or sliced chillis), turn down the heat a little, and cook gently for about 10 minutes until the ginger and garlic smell fragrant See Photo.
  • Add the mustard, vinegar and sugar and stir well.
  • Put another pan on the stove and put in the butter or oil. Heat well, and add the floured and spiced meat.
  • Stir well until the meat is coated with oil or butter and starts to fry See Photo. Stir about well for about 5 minutes, then add the fried meat to the onion mixture and stir well to combine. See Photo
  • Turn up the heat and stir in the chicken stock and vinegar See Photo. Bring to the boil, stirring. The sauce will begin to thicken immediately. Cook gently until the meat is thoroughly heated through, and the spices and flour are cooked, about 10-15 minutes.
  • Add the coconut milk, 1-2 tbsps. juice from the pineapple can, and more chicken stock if necessary to thin out the sauce to a nice consistency. See Photo
  • During the last period while the dish is finishing off, put the rice in a medium-sized pot, covered with plenty of boiling water. Bring back to the boil, then cover and simmer the rice for 10 ½ minutes. Add more water if necessary to keep the rice covered.
  • Put another kettle on to boil while the rice is cooking. Also, preheat the oven to Gas Mark ¼ or LOW, or the lowest setting you have. Put an ovenproof dish in to warm up, as well as your serving plates.
  • Drain the rice in a sieve, rinse with the kettle of boiling water, and put the well-drained rice in the ovenproof dish. Place in the low oven for a few minutes to dry out a little - not too long! 3-4 minutes will do.. Fluff up the grains with a fork.
  • Stir the curry well. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and more cayenne if necessary. Serve with the plain boiled Basmati rice, a slice of pineapple, and vegetables of choice.

Ingredients

  • Serving Size: 1 (113.6 g)
  • Calories 163.1
  • Total Fat - 8.1 g
  • Saturated Fat - 3.2 g
  • Cholesterol - 54.9 mg
  • Sodium - 418.6 mg
  • Total Carbohydrate - 1 g
  • Dietary Fiber - 0 g
  • Sugars - 0.2 g
  • Protein - 21.3 g
  • Calcium - 4.9 mg
  • Iron - 0.7 mg
  • Vitamin C - 1.5 mg
  • Thiamin - 0 mg

Step 1

Place tenderloins in a zip lock bag and add salad dressing

Step 2

Place in fridge at least one hour or overnight (I usually marinate overnight)

Step 3

Step 4

Remove tenderloins from bag (discard remaining dressing)place in a shallow foil lined pan

Step 5

Roast for 25 minutes or until done or when the internal temperature reaches 155 - 160 with a meat thermometer (ovens vary, I roast for about ten minutes at 400 then turn down to 350)


Directions

Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and preheat oven to 275°F. Season meat generously with salt and pepper and toss with mustard to coat. Heat oil in Dutch oven over high heat until shimmering, add the meat and sear it on all sides until well browned, about 8 minutes total. When meat is nearly finished browning, reduce heat to medium, and push meat off to the sides of the pan. Add onion and garlic to the center of the pan. Sauté until onions and garlic start soften and become translucent, about 4 minutes.

Add red wine, raise heat to medium-high and scrape browned bits from the bottom of the pan using a wooden spoon. Bring to a boil and simmer for 1 minute before adding tomato juice, cayenne, oregano, nutmeg and bay leaves. Stir to combine and season with salt and pepper, as needed.

Return to a boil. Then, cover and transfer to the oven to cook until fork-tender, about 4 hours. When meat is tender, remove from the oven, discard bay leaves and serve immediately with rice or orzo.


Piquant pork recipe - Recipes

Chicken Sauce Piquante - (Something Old)
PREP TIME: 1 1/2 Hours
SERVES: 6

STORY:
Although I created this recipe myself, I have vivid memories of my grandmother and mother cooking sauce piquante. I came from a big family of 12 and whenever lunch or dinner came around, we always seemed to have lots of company. In those days, we raised our own chickens, grew our own fresh vegetables, rice, corn and sugar cane, and our milk came right from the cow! Although it was hard work to cook back then, we sure had a great time. A few years ago when Hurricane Andrew came through, everybody was without electricity and most of the young people had no idea what to do under those circumstances. Our 6 children, with all of their children, came to our house and I cleaned out the freezer of chickens and vegetables and cooked up a sauce piquante large enough to feed our family and anyone else in the neighborhood. This recipe is also good with seafood or game. Thelma Lemoine - Lafayette

INGREDIENTS:

  • 6 chicken breasts
  • 1 1/2 cups oil
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 (6-ounce) can tomato paste
  • 1 cup chopped onions
  • 1/2 cup chopped celery
  • 1/2 cup chopped bell pepper
  • 2 tbsps diced garlic
  • 1 (10-ounce) can Rotel tomatoes
  • 1 (16-ounce) can whole tomatoes
  • 1 quart chicken stock
  • 2 tbsps sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • black pepper
  • cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 tsp oregano
  • 2 tbsps Worcestershire Sauce
  • 1/2 cup sliced green onions
  • 1/4 cup chopped parsley

METHOD:
In a heavy bottom dutch oven, heat oil over medium-high heat. Season chicken breasts using salt and peppers and sauté until golden brown. Remove from oil and keep warm. Add flour to pot and, using a wire whisk, stir until dark brown roux is achieved. Add tomato paste and continue to stir 5-6 minutes or until the sauce is a nice brown color. Add onions, celery, bell pepper and garlic. Sauté 3-5 minutes or until vegetables are wilted. Add tomatoes and chicken stock. Blend well into the roux mixture, bring to a rolling boil and reduce to simmer. Add chicken, sugar, salt and peppers. Blend well. Add oregano and Worcestershire. Allow to simmer 45 minutes or until chicken is tender. Finish with green onions and parsley. Serve over a plate of steamed white rice.

CHICKEN SAUCE PIQUANTE - (Something New)
PREP TIME: 1 1/2 Hours
SERVES: 6

INGREDIENTS:

  • 6 skinless chicken breasts
  • 1 cup oil-less roux
  • 1 quart defatted chicken stock, unsalted
  • 1/4 cup oil
  • 1 cup chopped onions
  • 1/2 cup chopped celery
  • 1/2 cup chopped bell pepper
  • 2 tbsps diced garlic
  • 1 (6-ounce) can tomato paste, no salt added
  • 1 (10-ounce) can Rotel tomatoes
  • 1 (16-ounce) can whole tomatoes no salt added
  • 2 tbsps sugar
  • salt substitute
  • black pepper
  • cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 tsp oregano
  • 2 tbsps Worcestershire Sauce
  • 1/2 cup sliced green onions
  • 1/4 cup chopped parsley

METHOD:
Dissolve oil-less roux in stock and set aside. In a cast iron dutch oven, heat oil over medium-high heat. Season chicken breasts using salt substitute and pepper and sauté until golden brown. Remove from oil and keep warm. Add onions, celery, bell pepper and garlic. Sauté 3-5 minutes or until vegetables are wilted. Add tomato paste, tomatoes and chicken stock/roux mixture. Blend well into the vegetable mixture, bring to a rolling boil and reduce to simmer. Add chicken, sugar, salt substitute and peppers. Blend well. Add oregano and Worcestershire. Allow to simmer 45 minutes or until chicken is tender. Finish with green onions and parsley. Serve over a plate of steamed white rice.


Flavourings – there's the rub

Rachael Wass recipe pulled pork. Photograph: Felicity Cloake

I'm torn here. The purists – the Bompas and Parrs and Rankins of this world – insist that, whenever you chose to do it, pulled pork should be seasoned only with sugar and salt. Things in the other camp can get bewildering: Wass rubs her pork with wholegrain mustard and chilli America's Test Kitchen applies "yellow mustard", liquid smoke, pepper, smoked paprika and cayenne pepper Jonathan Dale uses what he describes as a US-style barbecue rub involving smoked paprika, fennel, cumin, black pepper, cayenne, mustard powder, brown sugar, salt and garlic granules. It's smoky, aniseedy and gently spicy – absolutely delicious in fact.

In the end, however, I decide to leave the flavours to the sauce, and stick to a simple dark sugar and salt seasoning, with smoked paprika to add the desired charred flavour. The pork is rubbed before cooking, and the rest is added, Rankin-style, after pulling, so it's evenly distributed throughout the meat.

Dale also recommends basting with apple juice during cooking, but he uses a smoker – I don't find this necessary in the oven, as long as the meat itself has enough fat to keep it moist. I regret I don't manage to try out his idea of injecting it with a solution of water, apple juice and brown sugar during cooking though: along with incorporating the use of a sous-vide machine, it might be one for a second run at the process.


Perfect Match Recipe: Roast Pork Tenderloin with Pickled Strawberries, Goat Cheese and Ramp Pesto

When spring finally begins to spring, a dinner party is an ideal way to celebrate the thaw. Here’s a dish that overlays fine-dining sensibilities onto easy home techniques. Elegant pork tenderloin is pan-seared, then roasted in the oven, and the pan is deglazed with a fistful of frisée that soaks up the flavorful browned bits. It’s all plated with goat cheese and seasonal accents: an herbaceous ramp pesto and tangy, sweet pickled strawberries, both of which can be made a little ahead of time, though they don’t have to be.

For some, this dish may present an opportunity to cook through a particularly persistent bugaboo: the nagging sense that pork was put onto this Earth to be either under- or overcooked.

“I think a lot of people still to this day fear undercooking pork,” says Chris Royster, executive chef and partner of the Wine Spectator Grand Award–winning Flagstaff House in Boulder, Colo., and the brain behind this recipe. But with pork tenderloin, you should probably be more concerned about the opposite. “Tenderloins don’t really have any fat to them,” Royster explains. So if you’re figuring you may as well cook it a few minutes longer than necessary, just to be safe, “It’s not going to be good. You’re going to get a chalky, dry, chewy piece of pork tenderloin as opposed to that really moist, soft texture.”

Here’s the good news: A kitchen thermometer can provide you with a readout of the exact temperature of your meat, removing almost all of the guesswork. Once it registers 140° F, your meat is done.

Even if you don’t have a thermometer—and Royster admits he is one of these people—sensory cues can help. He relies on the feel of the meat. “You want it to be firm, and you want it to push back,” he says. “Squeeze it just softly, and if it pushes back right away, that’s done.”

Cutting the tenderloin into pieces of roughly similar size before searing also helps the meat to cook evenly. And somewhat paradoxically, the hotter your pan, the longer the pork will need to cook in the oven after it’s been browned, because the heat will have seared the outside before it’s had time to penetrate into the meat’s interior. If your pan is less hot, the pork will be more cooked through by the time it’s browned on the outside, so you’ll want to shorten the oven time a bit. Err on the side of a hotter pan, rather than a cooler one, for best results.

Look for ramps in the market from April to early June. “They’re so short-lived, but they’re so amazing,” Royster says. While a ramp somewhat resembles a scallion in appearance, “It’s going to be sweeter and it’s going to have more complexity to it.” It’s worth seeking them out if you can.

The pesto is best made the day you plan to eat it, but a few hours ahead is fine. If necessary, Royster says, it can be made the day before—just cover the pesto in a layer of olive oil to keep it from oxidizing and turning a sad brownish-green.

The quick-pickled strawberries add a deliciously bright, tangy component that you can prepare up to 24 hours in advance. Use the freshest strawberries possible.

The berries’ juiciness ties right into Royster and Flagstaff wine director Elizabeth Booth’s suggested wine pairing, A Tribute to Grace Grenache Santa Barbara Highlands Vineyard 2016, an unusually light red wine with bright fruit and a polished texture. If you can’t find it, similar light- to medium-bodied styles of fruity red wine could work well too.

Pairing Tip: Why a Light Grenache Works with This Dish

For more tips on how to approach pairing this dish with wine, recommended bottlings and notes on chef Chris Royster’s inspiration, read the companion article, "Pork Tenderloin With Grenache," in the April 30, 2019, issue, via our online archives or by ordering a digital edition (Zinio or Google Play) or a back issue of the print magazine. For even more wine pairing options, WineSpectator.com members can find other recently rated California Grenache in our Wine Ratings Search.

Pork Tenderloin with Pickled Strawberries, Goat Cheese & Ramp Pesto

For the pickled strawberries:

  • 1 cup Champagne vinegar or white wine vinegar
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon mustard seed or grainy mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon pink peppercorns
  • 12 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 1 pint (3/4 pound, about 12 to 16) fresh strawberries
  • 1/2 cup pine nuts
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus more
  • 1 pound fresh ramps, trimmed of roots, rinsed and dried, and cut into halves or thirds
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Olive oil or canola oil
  • Two 1-pound pork tenderloins, trimmed of all fat
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) butter
  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 3 or 4 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 2 heads frisée or curly endives, washed and trimmed

1. In a small saucepan, combine the vinegar, honey, 1 teaspoon salt, mustard seed, peppercorns and coriander seeds over high heat. Stir to combine. As soon as mixture boils, turn off heat. Let steep for 10 minutes. Trim ends from strawberries, and place strawberries in a small bowl. When pickling liquid is room temperature, pour over strawberries. Cover and chill for at least 2 hours and up to 24 hours.

2. Preheat the oven to 375° F. Spread the pine nuts on a baking sheet and toast, shaking the pan occasionally, until golden-brown, about 10 minutes. Remove from oven and lower temperature to 350° F.

3. Place garlic, pine nuts and a bit of olive oil in a food processor. Blend until coarsely chopped. Add ramps. With the motor running, slowly stream in 1/2 cup olive oil, processing until the ramps are chopped but not pureed and the mixture is well-blended into a coarse pesto. Blend in Parmesan, and season to taste with salt and pepper. Pesto can be made a few hours ahead but is best made the same day you intend to eat it.

4. Heat a cast-iron pan over medium-high. Add a small amount of olive oil or canola oil. Cut pork into similar-size pieces as needed to fit into pan this will help with even cooking. Season all sides with salt and pepper. When oil shimmers, place meat in pan. Sear the meat, rotating to brown all sides, about 3 minutes per side. When searing the final sides, add butter, rosemary and thyme to pan. This may get smoky, so be sure to have your vent fans on. Transfer pan to oven. Roast until an instant-read thermometer registers 140° F or until the meat springs back immediately when lightly squeezed, 5 to 10 minutes. Transfer to a cutting board, tent with foil and let rest 10 minutes.

5. Drain fat and herbs from pan and return pan to stovetop over medium-high heat. Add a very small amount of oil. Take care not to let the fond (the browned bits) in the pan burn as soon as the oil is heated, add the frisée, which will deglaze the pan and absorb the fond’s flavors. Turn with tongs to sear. Season lightly with salt and pepper.

6. Slice pork. Drain strawberries and, if desired, slice them. Place some frisée and a few strawberries on each dinner plate. Top with a few slices of pork, and spoon pesto over. Break up goat cheese into pieces and scatter on top. Serves 6.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 pork tenderloins (3/4 - 1 pound each), trimmed
  • Coarse salt and ground pepper
  • 1/4 cup whole-grain mustard
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons reduced-fat sour cream

Heat oil in a large skillet over high heat. Season pork with salt and pepper transfer to skillet and cook, turning, until browned all over, 5 to 10 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low and cover skillet cook pork, turning occasionally, until an instant-read thermometer registers 150 degrees. 20 to 25 minutes. Transfer pork to a plate, cover with aluminum foil, and let rest 10 minutes (reserve skillet with juices).

To juices in skillet, add mustards, and sour cream, and any accumulated juices from resting pork whisk over medium heat until heated through (do not boil). Add water, if sauce is too thick.


Tender pork stew

Preheat the oven to 150°C, fan 140°C, gas 2. Heat half the olive oil in a medium non-stick saucepan. Dust the pork with the flour. Add half the pork to the pan and brown on all sides. Remove to a plate. Repeat with the rest of the pork and set aside.

Add the remaining olive oil to the pan, along with the onion, carrots and celery and cook, stirring occasionally, for about 10 minutes, until the onion has softened slightly. Return the meat to the pan with the garlic, tomatoes, bay leaf and thyme leaves. Make up 500ml stock using the stock cube and pour 300ml into the pan (save the rest for another recipe). Bring to the boil, then carefully pour the contents of the pan into an ovenproof casserole. Cover with a lid then transfer to the oven and cook for 2 hours.

Just before serving, remove the casserole from the oven, sprinkle with the grated parmesan and bake until the cheese has melted.


How to Cook Pork Menudo

This pork menudo recipe requires the meat to be marinated in soy sauce and lemon first before cooking. Combine the pork, soy sauce and lemon in a bowl. Mix well and let it stay for at least 1 hour. It will be better to store the bowl inside the refrigerator while you marinate to avoid contamination. Make sure to cover the bowl before doing this.

Take the pork out of the fridge 15 minutes before cooking. Start to saute the garlic and onion. You will notice that this method is common in Filipino cuisine. Most Filipino foods are cooked starting with sauteing garlic and onion.

Once the onions are soft, add the marinated pork and cook until it browns. Add tomato sauce (you can also use crushed tomatoes), water (or beef broth), and bay leaves. We are using dried bay leaves for this recipe. Cover and simmer until the meat gets tender — which is usually 40 to 60 minutes depending on the quality of the meat. Once the meat is done, it is time to add the sliced liver. You can add the liver fresh or you can saute it first in ginger and garlic to make it less gamey. Add the veggies after this step and continue to cook for a few more minutes.

Add the salt and pepper depending on your preference. Also, try not to overcook the potato and carrots because it will get very soft — unless you prefer it that way.


Watch the video: LOS PIKANTES ENGANCHADOS 2020. LUCHODJ


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