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The Rural Brewer: 1188 Brewing

The Rural Brewer: 1188 Brewing


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If there’s one thing the 2014 World Beer Cup taught us it’s that you never know where the next great beer is going to come from and that in this era where some folks like to misuse the word “saturation” the new kids are all right. I can’t use the Chetco Brewery as a focus for The Rural Brewer because even though Brookings is the farthest town with a brewery from Portland, it’s still well-traveled and home to even a second brewery, Tight Lines. But way out in John Day, on the drive between already distant Baker City and equally remote Prineville.
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While many brewers are eager to serve their newest concoction, a handful are going backward to restore beer recipes lost to time. Small and independent craft breweries team up with historians, archaeologists, microbiologists and museums to bring styles from another era back to life.

In Chicago, you may get to try what they drank in ancient civilizations in Peru and China. Off Color Brewing has worked with the Field Museum of Natural History to recreate beers from the Wari Empire, which occupied much of Peru from the seventh to 11th centuries A.D. and also beer from the Shang and Zhoe dynasties that thrived in China thousands of years ago.

Off Color Brewing and Chicago’s Field Museum collaborate on Wari beer. (Jean Lachat/The Field Museum)

In Peru, Field Museum researchers discovered a brewery that seems to have been destroyed around 1100 A.D. They analyzed residues found in drinking vessels and discovered that forerunners of brewers making fruit beer today used Peruvian peppercorn (molle berries) in their beer. Archaeologists found the seeds at the site. So the museum teamed up with Off Color to recreate the chicha de molle inhabitants brewed and drank more than a thousand years ago. They came up with Wari, a purple beverage with a 3.8% ABV.

While the Wari themselves probably didn’t drink out of clear glass, it gets served that way today so imbibers can see the unique color. “It is like nothing else, evocative of a sour with a balsamic vinegary tart, refreshing taste, a good summer beer,” says Megan Williams, museum director of business enterprise.

Off Color didn’t follow the production method to the letter, though. “Traditionally, chicha fermentation happens by people chewing on corn and spitting it into a vessel. We didn’t do that,” explains Ben Ustick, Off Color social media manager.

They named the Chinese beer QingMing after a traditional Chinese holiday to honor ancestors. Unlike the Wari exhibit that focused on a single site, the China project sought to amalgamate what it found in various places. Brewers combined honey, dates, peaches, jasmine, plums and rice. “Rice adds fermentable sugar to alcohol,” Ustick explains, creating beer “that drinks like saison.”

But Off Color found it couldn’t use all the traditional ingredients. The Chinese used hemp as a filter and osmanthus flower, which adds apricot-like flavor. But they’re not legal to use in beer in the U.S. without going through a tedious approval process. “We had to think on our feet,” Ustick recalls. “We used peaches instead of apricot alfalfa instead of hemp.”

You can find the beers off and on at the museum restaurant and brewery — whenever it fits production schedules.


While many brewers are eager to serve their newest concoction, a handful are going backward to restore beer recipes lost to time. Small and independent craft breweries team up with historians, archaeologists, microbiologists and museums to bring styles from another era back to life.

In Chicago, you may get to try what they drank in ancient civilizations in Peru and China. Off Color Brewing has worked with the Field Museum of Natural History to recreate beers from the Wari Empire, which occupied much of Peru from the seventh to 11th centuries A.D. and also beer from the Shang and Zhoe dynasties that thrived in China thousands of years ago.

Off Color Brewing and Chicago’s Field Museum collaborate on Wari beer. (Jean Lachat/The Field Museum)

In Peru, Field Museum researchers discovered a brewery that seems to have been destroyed around 1100 A.D. They analyzed residues found in drinking vessels and discovered that forerunners of brewers making fruit beer today used Peruvian peppercorn (molle berries) in their beer. Archaeologists found the seeds at the site. So the museum teamed up with Off Color to recreate the chicha de molle inhabitants brewed and drank more than a thousand years ago. They came up with Wari, a purple beverage with a 3.8% ABV.

While the Wari themselves probably didn’t drink out of clear glass, it gets served that way today so imbibers can see the unique color. “It is like nothing else, evocative of a sour with a balsamic vinegary tart, refreshing taste, a good summer beer,” says Megan Williams, museum director of business enterprise.

Off Color didn’t follow the production method to the letter, though. “Traditionally, chicha fermentation happens by people chewing on corn and spitting it into a vessel. We didn’t do that,” explains Ben Ustick, Off Color social media manager.

They named the Chinese beer QingMing after a traditional Chinese holiday to honor ancestors. Unlike the Wari exhibit that focused on a single site, the China project sought to amalgamate what it found in various places. Brewers combined honey, dates, peaches, jasmine, plums and rice. “Rice adds fermentable sugar to alcohol,” Ustick explains, creating beer “that drinks like saison.”

But Off Color found it couldn’t use all the traditional ingredients. The Chinese used hemp as a filter and osmanthus flower, which adds apricot-like flavor. But they’re not legal to use in beer in the U.S. without going through a tedious approval process. “We had to think on our feet,” Ustick recalls. “We used peaches instead of apricot alfalfa instead of hemp.”

You can find the beers off and on at the museum restaurant and brewery — whenever it fits production schedules.


While many brewers are eager to serve their newest concoction, a handful are going backward to restore beer recipes lost to time. Small and independent craft breweries team up with historians, archaeologists, microbiologists and museums to bring styles from another era back to life.

In Chicago, you may get to try what they drank in ancient civilizations in Peru and China. Off Color Brewing has worked with the Field Museum of Natural History to recreate beers from the Wari Empire, which occupied much of Peru from the seventh to 11th centuries A.D. and also beer from the Shang and Zhoe dynasties that thrived in China thousands of years ago.

Off Color Brewing and Chicago’s Field Museum collaborate on Wari beer. (Jean Lachat/The Field Museum)

In Peru, Field Museum researchers discovered a brewery that seems to have been destroyed around 1100 A.D. They analyzed residues found in drinking vessels and discovered that forerunners of brewers making fruit beer today used Peruvian peppercorn (molle berries) in their beer. Archaeologists found the seeds at the site. So the museum teamed up with Off Color to recreate the chicha de molle inhabitants brewed and drank more than a thousand years ago. They came up with Wari, a purple beverage with a 3.8% ABV.

While the Wari themselves probably didn’t drink out of clear glass, it gets served that way today so imbibers can see the unique color. “It is like nothing else, evocative of a sour with a balsamic vinegary tart, refreshing taste, a good summer beer,” says Megan Williams, museum director of business enterprise.

Off Color didn’t follow the production method to the letter, though. “Traditionally, chicha fermentation happens by people chewing on corn and spitting it into a vessel. We didn’t do that,” explains Ben Ustick, Off Color social media manager.

They named the Chinese beer QingMing after a traditional Chinese holiday to honor ancestors. Unlike the Wari exhibit that focused on a single site, the China project sought to amalgamate what it found in various places. Brewers combined honey, dates, peaches, jasmine, plums and rice. “Rice adds fermentable sugar to alcohol,” Ustick explains, creating beer “that drinks like saison.”

But Off Color found it couldn’t use all the traditional ingredients. The Chinese used hemp as a filter and osmanthus flower, which adds apricot-like flavor. But they’re not legal to use in beer in the U.S. without going through a tedious approval process. “We had to think on our feet,” Ustick recalls. “We used peaches instead of apricot alfalfa instead of hemp.”

You can find the beers off and on at the museum restaurant and brewery — whenever it fits production schedules.


While many brewers are eager to serve their newest concoction, a handful are going backward to restore beer recipes lost to time. Small and independent craft breweries team up with historians, archaeologists, microbiologists and museums to bring styles from another era back to life.

In Chicago, you may get to try what they drank in ancient civilizations in Peru and China. Off Color Brewing has worked with the Field Museum of Natural History to recreate beers from the Wari Empire, which occupied much of Peru from the seventh to 11th centuries A.D. and also beer from the Shang and Zhoe dynasties that thrived in China thousands of years ago.

Off Color Brewing and Chicago’s Field Museum collaborate on Wari beer. (Jean Lachat/The Field Museum)

In Peru, Field Museum researchers discovered a brewery that seems to have been destroyed around 1100 A.D. They analyzed residues found in drinking vessels and discovered that forerunners of brewers making fruit beer today used Peruvian peppercorn (molle berries) in their beer. Archaeologists found the seeds at the site. So the museum teamed up with Off Color to recreate the chicha de molle inhabitants brewed and drank more than a thousand years ago. They came up with Wari, a purple beverage with a 3.8% ABV.

While the Wari themselves probably didn’t drink out of clear glass, it gets served that way today so imbibers can see the unique color. “It is like nothing else, evocative of a sour with a balsamic vinegary tart, refreshing taste, a good summer beer,” says Megan Williams, museum director of business enterprise.

Off Color didn’t follow the production method to the letter, though. “Traditionally, chicha fermentation happens by people chewing on corn and spitting it into a vessel. We didn’t do that,” explains Ben Ustick, Off Color social media manager.

They named the Chinese beer QingMing after a traditional Chinese holiday to honor ancestors. Unlike the Wari exhibit that focused on a single site, the China project sought to amalgamate what it found in various places. Brewers combined honey, dates, peaches, jasmine, plums and rice. “Rice adds fermentable sugar to alcohol,” Ustick explains, creating beer “that drinks like saison.”

But Off Color found it couldn’t use all the traditional ingredients. The Chinese used hemp as a filter and osmanthus flower, which adds apricot-like flavor. But they’re not legal to use in beer in the U.S. without going through a tedious approval process. “We had to think on our feet,” Ustick recalls. “We used peaches instead of apricot alfalfa instead of hemp.”

You can find the beers off and on at the museum restaurant and brewery — whenever it fits production schedules.


While many brewers are eager to serve their newest concoction, a handful are going backward to restore beer recipes lost to time. Small and independent craft breweries team up with historians, archaeologists, microbiologists and museums to bring styles from another era back to life.

In Chicago, you may get to try what they drank in ancient civilizations in Peru and China. Off Color Brewing has worked with the Field Museum of Natural History to recreate beers from the Wari Empire, which occupied much of Peru from the seventh to 11th centuries A.D. and also beer from the Shang and Zhoe dynasties that thrived in China thousands of years ago.

Off Color Brewing and Chicago’s Field Museum collaborate on Wari beer. (Jean Lachat/The Field Museum)

In Peru, Field Museum researchers discovered a brewery that seems to have been destroyed around 1100 A.D. They analyzed residues found in drinking vessels and discovered that forerunners of brewers making fruit beer today used Peruvian peppercorn (molle berries) in their beer. Archaeologists found the seeds at the site. So the museum teamed up with Off Color to recreate the chicha de molle inhabitants brewed and drank more than a thousand years ago. They came up with Wari, a purple beverage with a 3.8% ABV.

While the Wari themselves probably didn’t drink out of clear glass, it gets served that way today so imbibers can see the unique color. “It is like nothing else, evocative of a sour with a balsamic vinegary tart, refreshing taste, a good summer beer,” says Megan Williams, museum director of business enterprise.

Off Color didn’t follow the production method to the letter, though. “Traditionally, chicha fermentation happens by people chewing on corn and spitting it into a vessel. We didn’t do that,” explains Ben Ustick, Off Color social media manager.

They named the Chinese beer QingMing after a traditional Chinese holiday to honor ancestors. Unlike the Wari exhibit that focused on a single site, the China project sought to amalgamate what it found in various places. Brewers combined honey, dates, peaches, jasmine, plums and rice. “Rice adds fermentable sugar to alcohol,” Ustick explains, creating beer “that drinks like saison.”

But Off Color found it couldn’t use all the traditional ingredients. The Chinese used hemp as a filter and osmanthus flower, which adds apricot-like flavor. But they’re not legal to use in beer in the U.S. without going through a tedious approval process. “We had to think on our feet,” Ustick recalls. “We used peaches instead of apricot alfalfa instead of hemp.”

You can find the beers off and on at the museum restaurant and brewery — whenever it fits production schedules.


While many brewers are eager to serve their newest concoction, a handful are going backward to restore beer recipes lost to time. Small and independent craft breweries team up with historians, archaeologists, microbiologists and museums to bring styles from another era back to life.

In Chicago, you may get to try what they drank in ancient civilizations in Peru and China. Off Color Brewing has worked with the Field Museum of Natural History to recreate beers from the Wari Empire, which occupied much of Peru from the seventh to 11th centuries A.D. and also beer from the Shang and Zhoe dynasties that thrived in China thousands of years ago.

Off Color Brewing and Chicago’s Field Museum collaborate on Wari beer. (Jean Lachat/The Field Museum)

In Peru, Field Museum researchers discovered a brewery that seems to have been destroyed around 1100 A.D. They analyzed residues found in drinking vessels and discovered that forerunners of brewers making fruit beer today used Peruvian peppercorn (molle berries) in their beer. Archaeologists found the seeds at the site. So the museum teamed up with Off Color to recreate the chicha de molle inhabitants brewed and drank more than a thousand years ago. They came up with Wari, a purple beverage with a 3.8% ABV.

While the Wari themselves probably didn’t drink out of clear glass, it gets served that way today so imbibers can see the unique color. “It is like nothing else, evocative of a sour with a balsamic vinegary tart, refreshing taste, a good summer beer,” says Megan Williams, museum director of business enterprise.

Off Color didn’t follow the production method to the letter, though. “Traditionally, chicha fermentation happens by people chewing on corn and spitting it into a vessel. We didn’t do that,” explains Ben Ustick, Off Color social media manager.

They named the Chinese beer QingMing after a traditional Chinese holiday to honor ancestors. Unlike the Wari exhibit that focused on a single site, the China project sought to amalgamate what it found in various places. Brewers combined honey, dates, peaches, jasmine, plums and rice. “Rice adds fermentable sugar to alcohol,” Ustick explains, creating beer “that drinks like saison.”

But Off Color found it couldn’t use all the traditional ingredients. The Chinese used hemp as a filter and osmanthus flower, which adds apricot-like flavor. But they’re not legal to use in beer in the U.S. without going through a tedious approval process. “We had to think on our feet,” Ustick recalls. “We used peaches instead of apricot alfalfa instead of hemp.”

You can find the beers off and on at the museum restaurant and brewery — whenever it fits production schedules.


While many brewers are eager to serve their newest concoction, a handful are going backward to restore beer recipes lost to time. Small and independent craft breweries team up with historians, archaeologists, microbiologists and museums to bring styles from another era back to life.

In Chicago, you may get to try what they drank in ancient civilizations in Peru and China. Off Color Brewing has worked with the Field Museum of Natural History to recreate beers from the Wari Empire, which occupied much of Peru from the seventh to 11th centuries A.D. and also beer from the Shang and Zhoe dynasties that thrived in China thousands of years ago.

Off Color Brewing and Chicago’s Field Museum collaborate on Wari beer. (Jean Lachat/The Field Museum)

In Peru, Field Museum researchers discovered a brewery that seems to have been destroyed around 1100 A.D. They analyzed residues found in drinking vessels and discovered that forerunners of brewers making fruit beer today used Peruvian peppercorn (molle berries) in their beer. Archaeologists found the seeds at the site. So the museum teamed up with Off Color to recreate the chicha de molle inhabitants brewed and drank more than a thousand years ago. They came up with Wari, a purple beverage with a 3.8% ABV.

While the Wari themselves probably didn’t drink out of clear glass, it gets served that way today so imbibers can see the unique color. “It is like nothing else, evocative of a sour with a balsamic vinegary tart, refreshing taste, a good summer beer,” says Megan Williams, museum director of business enterprise.

Off Color didn’t follow the production method to the letter, though. “Traditionally, chicha fermentation happens by people chewing on corn and spitting it into a vessel. We didn’t do that,” explains Ben Ustick, Off Color social media manager.

They named the Chinese beer QingMing after a traditional Chinese holiday to honor ancestors. Unlike the Wari exhibit that focused on a single site, the China project sought to amalgamate what it found in various places. Brewers combined honey, dates, peaches, jasmine, plums and rice. “Rice adds fermentable sugar to alcohol,” Ustick explains, creating beer “that drinks like saison.”

But Off Color found it couldn’t use all the traditional ingredients. The Chinese used hemp as a filter and osmanthus flower, which adds apricot-like flavor. But they’re not legal to use in beer in the U.S. without going through a tedious approval process. “We had to think on our feet,” Ustick recalls. “We used peaches instead of apricot alfalfa instead of hemp.”

You can find the beers off and on at the museum restaurant and brewery — whenever it fits production schedules.


While many brewers are eager to serve their newest concoction, a handful are going backward to restore beer recipes lost to time. Small and independent craft breweries team up with historians, archaeologists, microbiologists and museums to bring styles from another era back to life.

In Chicago, you may get to try what they drank in ancient civilizations in Peru and China. Off Color Brewing has worked with the Field Museum of Natural History to recreate beers from the Wari Empire, which occupied much of Peru from the seventh to 11th centuries A.D. and also beer from the Shang and Zhoe dynasties that thrived in China thousands of years ago.

Off Color Brewing and Chicago’s Field Museum collaborate on Wari beer. (Jean Lachat/The Field Museum)

In Peru, Field Museum researchers discovered a brewery that seems to have been destroyed around 1100 A.D. They analyzed residues found in drinking vessels and discovered that forerunners of brewers making fruit beer today used Peruvian peppercorn (molle berries) in their beer. Archaeologists found the seeds at the site. So the museum teamed up with Off Color to recreate the chicha de molle inhabitants brewed and drank more than a thousand years ago. They came up with Wari, a purple beverage with a 3.8% ABV.

While the Wari themselves probably didn’t drink out of clear glass, it gets served that way today so imbibers can see the unique color. “It is like nothing else, evocative of a sour with a balsamic vinegary tart, refreshing taste, a good summer beer,” says Megan Williams, museum director of business enterprise.

Off Color didn’t follow the production method to the letter, though. “Traditionally, chicha fermentation happens by people chewing on corn and spitting it into a vessel. We didn’t do that,” explains Ben Ustick, Off Color social media manager.

They named the Chinese beer QingMing after a traditional Chinese holiday to honor ancestors. Unlike the Wari exhibit that focused on a single site, the China project sought to amalgamate what it found in various places. Brewers combined honey, dates, peaches, jasmine, plums and rice. “Rice adds fermentable sugar to alcohol,” Ustick explains, creating beer “that drinks like saison.”

But Off Color found it couldn’t use all the traditional ingredients. The Chinese used hemp as a filter and osmanthus flower, which adds apricot-like flavor. But they’re not legal to use in beer in the U.S. without going through a tedious approval process. “We had to think on our feet,” Ustick recalls. “We used peaches instead of apricot alfalfa instead of hemp.”

You can find the beers off and on at the museum restaurant and brewery — whenever it fits production schedules.


While many brewers are eager to serve their newest concoction, a handful are going backward to restore beer recipes lost to time. Small and independent craft breweries team up with historians, archaeologists, microbiologists and museums to bring styles from another era back to life.

In Chicago, you may get to try what they drank in ancient civilizations in Peru and China. Off Color Brewing has worked with the Field Museum of Natural History to recreate beers from the Wari Empire, which occupied much of Peru from the seventh to 11th centuries A.D. and also beer from the Shang and Zhoe dynasties that thrived in China thousands of years ago.

Off Color Brewing and Chicago’s Field Museum collaborate on Wari beer. (Jean Lachat/The Field Museum)

In Peru, Field Museum researchers discovered a brewery that seems to have been destroyed around 1100 A.D. They analyzed residues found in drinking vessels and discovered that forerunners of brewers making fruit beer today used Peruvian peppercorn (molle berries) in their beer. Archaeologists found the seeds at the site. So the museum teamed up with Off Color to recreate the chicha de molle inhabitants brewed and drank more than a thousand years ago. They came up with Wari, a purple beverage with a 3.8% ABV.

While the Wari themselves probably didn’t drink out of clear glass, it gets served that way today so imbibers can see the unique color. “It is like nothing else, evocative of a sour with a balsamic vinegary tart, refreshing taste, a good summer beer,” says Megan Williams, museum director of business enterprise.

Off Color didn’t follow the production method to the letter, though. “Traditionally, chicha fermentation happens by people chewing on corn and spitting it into a vessel. We didn’t do that,” explains Ben Ustick, Off Color social media manager.

They named the Chinese beer QingMing after a traditional Chinese holiday to honor ancestors. Unlike the Wari exhibit that focused on a single site, the China project sought to amalgamate what it found in various places. Brewers combined honey, dates, peaches, jasmine, plums and rice. “Rice adds fermentable sugar to alcohol,” Ustick explains, creating beer “that drinks like saison.”

But Off Color found it couldn’t use all the traditional ingredients. The Chinese used hemp as a filter and osmanthus flower, which adds apricot-like flavor. But they’re not legal to use in beer in the U.S. without going through a tedious approval process. “We had to think on our feet,” Ustick recalls. “We used peaches instead of apricot alfalfa instead of hemp.”

You can find the beers off and on at the museum restaurant and brewery — whenever it fits production schedules.


While many brewers are eager to serve their newest concoction, a handful are going backward to restore beer recipes lost to time. Small and independent craft breweries team up with historians, archaeologists, microbiologists and museums to bring styles from another era back to life.

In Chicago, you may get to try what they drank in ancient civilizations in Peru and China. Off Color Brewing has worked with the Field Museum of Natural History to recreate beers from the Wari Empire, which occupied much of Peru from the seventh to 11th centuries A.D. and also beer from the Shang and Zhoe dynasties that thrived in China thousands of years ago.

Off Color Brewing and Chicago’s Field Museum collaborate on Wari beer. (Jean Lachat/The Field Museum)

In Peru, Field Museum researchers discovered a brewery that seems to have been destroyed around 1100 A.D. They analyzed residues found in drinking vessels and discovered that forerunners of brewers making fruit beer today used Peruvian peppercorn (molle berries) in their beer. Archaeologists found the seeds at the site. So the museum teamed up with Off Color to recreate the chicha de molle inhabitants brewed and drank more than a thousand years ago. They came up with Wari, a purple beverage with a 3.8% ABV.

While the Wari themselves probably didn’t drink out of clear glass, it gets served that way today so imbibers can see the unique color. “It is like nothing else, evocative of a sour with a balsamic vinegary tart, refreshing taste, a good summer beer,” says Megan Williams, museum director of business enterprise.

Off Color didn’t follow the production method to the letter, though. “Traditionally, chicha fermentation happens by people chewing on corn and spitting it into a vessel. We didn’t do that,” explains Ben Ustick, Off Color social media manager.

They named the Chinese beer QingMing after a traditional Chinese holiday to honor ancestors. Unlike the Wari exhibit that focused on a single site, the China project sought to amalgamate what it found in various places. Brewers combined honey, dates, peaches, jasmine, plums and rice. “Rice adds fermentable sugar to alcohol,” Ustick explains, creating beer “that drinks like saison.”

But Off Color found it couldn’t use all the traditional ingredients. The Chinese used hemp as a filter and osmanthus flower, which adds apricot-like flavor. But they’re not legal to use in beer in the U.S. without going through a tedious approval process. “We had to think on our feet,” Ustick recalls. “We used peaches instead of apricot alfalfa instead of hemp.”

You can find the beers off and on at the museum restaurant and brewery — whenever it fits production schedules.


Watch the video: A Career as a Brewer JTJS52010


Comments:

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