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8 Tips for Moms-to-Be

8 Tips for Moms-to-Be


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Being pregnant brings about a lot of change: Not only will you have a new life to take care of but you also need to adapt and change the life you’re leading — it can be a lot. With all of the advice, tips, and studies out there warning women about what to eat (and what not to eat) during pregnancy, making the ‘right’ decision can be overwhelming. To simplify the process for other women, author Erika Lenkert paired up with nutritionist Brooke Alpert to create delicious recipes that let women enjoy eating during pregnancy in a fun and healthy way. Her recently published book Healthy Eating During Pregnancy features 100 of these recipes plus great nutritional information and advice.

How did she come up with the recipes? “I thought about what I wanted to eat when I was pregnant and reviewed what more than 100 women I surveyed wanted to eat when they were pregnant," she says. "Then I crafted a master list that addressed those cravings as well as the nutritional needs of pregnant women.” Her goal was to make recipes that were not just healthy, but delicious enough that anyone can make them and be able to fully indulge in them but still treat their body right. To top it off, she also added in dishes from top chefs around the nation. Lenkert says she still cooks these recipes even though she’s not pregnant plus they are also kid-friendly — five-year-old loves them too.

We asked Erika to share some basic tips from her own experience and from the book to provide a starting base for soon-to-be mothers looking for ways to eat well during pregnancy. In the tips below, she shares good snack ideas, what foods to avoid, plus a few fantastic recipes to try out at home (whether you’re pregnant or not).

1. Stick to a Meal Plan or Snack?

In order to stay mentally and physically balanced — as well as to avoid setting yourself up to overeat — it’s a good idea to have five or six small meals throughout each day. Anyone who has been waiting without a snack on hand the minute it’s needed can tell you that hell hath no fury like a hungry pregnant woman. When I was pregnant, I was perpetually hungry, although there were only a couple of months when I felt as though I could eat the leather off of my car seat at any moment.

Recommended Snacks: In her book, Lenkert recommends carrying snacks like low-fat yogurt, string cheese, and edamame in your bag when you’re on the go.

2. Are You Really Eating for Two?

Theoretically, yes, meaning that what you eat your growing baby is also eating, so you should be mindful of what you put in your mouth and opt for healthy foods. But literally, the answer is no. You don’t need to double your caloric intake. In fact, a woman of average weight for her size really only needs between 200 and 300 extra calories per day — and that’s not until the third trimester, when the baby is really bulking up. In other words, all you really need to eat is about 2,500 calories per day.

Recipe Idea: Roasted Beet, Orange, and Avocado Salad.

3. Should You Follow a Meal Plan?

There is no one right meal plan to follow when pregnant. The secret is to eat a variety of healthy foods — proteins, leafy greens, and other veggies, good carbs, dairy, and fruit — and ideally to forgo processed foods for homemade deliciousness. Also, by all means indulge yourself every now and then!

Recipe Idea: Quinoa Tabbouleh

4. Foods to Avoid

When I was pregnant, I was annoyed at how pregnancy books and media hyped up the fear factor around foods and pregnancy. It was enough to make a confident, healthy person like me suddenly feel as though I didn’t know how to take care of my own body. The truth is seafood high in mercury and meats with nitrates (which is linked to cancer) aside, many of the “no-no foods” are labeled as such because they could give you food poisoning. Eating contaminated foods can result in a serious inconvenience when you’re only taking care of yourself, but can have far more severe consequences for your growing baby. Of course, we don’t get food poisoning that often, but you don’t want to do anything you would regret or blame yourself should anything go wrong during your pregnancy.

For that reason, I always recommend pregnant women educate themselves on food no-nos and make choices that they are personally comfortable with.

With that in mind, here are blanket guidelines of what to avoid:

1. Raw or undercooked foods, including seafood, meat, poultry, and eggs

2. Seafood high in mercury, such as swordfish, shark, king mackerel, and tilefish

3. Cheese, juice, and milk that aren't pasteurized

4. Large quantities of liver, which is a significant source of vitamin A and can be dangerous consumed in large amounts

5. Unwashed fruits and vegetables

6. Excess caffeine

7. Alcohol; no amount has been deemed safe by physicians


8 Helpful Tips for Mother-Led Weaning

Whether you've breastfed your baby for 12 months or 2 years, starting the weaning process can feel daunting. Some moms advocate letting a child self-wean, but many initiate or encourage the weaning process themselves. If you're wondering how to begin and complete a parent-led weaning process, we've rounded up eight helpful tips from Circle of Moms members who've been through it.

1. Gradually Eliminate Sessions

One of the most common weaning tips moms recommend is eliminating feedings one by one over time. While the AAP suggests eliminating a feeding every 2-3 days, many Circle of Moms members recommend a longer timeline, waiting 1-3 weeks before eliminating a second feeding. As Shauna, a member of the Breastfeeding Moms community, shares: "I heard you should drop a feeding every 2-3 days too but that was not enough for me. I needed at least a week, but I found a week and a half to 2 weeks to be better."

2. Drop a Midday Session First Replace with a Meal

Wondering which feeding to drop first? Many moms advise that a midday feeding day may be the easiest. As Shauna shares: "Drop the middle of the day feedings first and supplement with formula or milk, and then the morning and bedtime feedings the last. I am on the bedtime feeding right now and can't believe I've made it this far."

If your child has started solids, many moms recommend swapping in a meal when an eliminated feeding would normally have taken place. Sarah M. recommends: "My suggestion is to start solids and let a meal at a time replace breastfeeding."

3. Limit The Length of a Session

Before cutting out a feeding, some moms recommend tapering down the amount of nursing time of that feeding. Brooke A. explains: "For a few days before totally eliminating the feeding, I limited her time nursing. The first day just by a minute or two, then by the last days [I] only allowied her to nurse for a minute or so. She had no problem with this."

4. Sippy Cup Instead of Bottle

To avoid the difficulty of yet another weaning process, some moms also recommend transitioning to a sippy cup rather than bottle. Sarah M. explains: "You don't have to go to a bottle at all. My son went straight to a sippy cup. One less thing to wean him from."

5. "Don't Offer, Don't Refuse"

An alternative to gradually eliminating one feeding at a time is the "don't offer, don't refuse" method of weaning, in which you wean your child by only breastfeeding when the child wants to. Jenna H. explains: "If she wants to nurse, so be it, but otherwise just go about your daily business and do meals and snacks in her seat." (Not all kids want to give up the breast, so this method can be slow.)

6. Hide Temptation

"You have to make sure though that they do not see your breasts (including low cut shirts) until they are used to the new schedule," Karla D. wisely notes. "All it will do is frustrate them because they know you are denying them their favorite snack :)."

7. Pay Attention to Breast Pain

Breast pain during the weaning process is typically the result of a too-sudden change in the nursing schedule. Hot showers can help your body ease into the change, but as Breanne L. warns, "If your breasts start to hurt a lot, make sure to get them checked by a doctor!" Mastitis, a breast infection, may be the culprit.

8. Be Prepared for Some Resistance

It's natural for moms to encounter some resistance from a child being weaned. Breanne L. recalls: "I started by replacing one breastfeeding session with a sippy cup filled with whole milk and did that for about 3 weeks. My son gave me a lot of resistance on that one and was mad at me for quite awhile! . By the time it came around to getting rid of the bedtime feed, my son transitioned like nothing, and he didn't even get mad!"

Related Reading

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of, and should not be attributed to, POPSUGAR.


8 Helpful Tips for Mother-Led Weaning

Whether you've breastfed your baby for 12 months or 2 years, starting the weaning process can feel daunting. Some moms advocate letting a child self-wean, but many initiate or encourage the weaning process themselves. If you're wondering how to begin and complete a parent-led weaning process, we've rounded up eight helpful tips from Circle of Moms members who've been through it.

1. Gradually Eliminate Sessions

One of the most common weaning tips moms recommend is eliminating feedings one by one over time. While the AAP suggests eliminating a feeding every 2-3 days, many Circle of Moms members recommend a longer timeline, waiting 1-3 weeks before eliminating a second feeding. As Shauna, a member of the Breastfeeding Moms community, shares: "I heard you should drop a feeding every 2-3 days too but that was not enough for me. I needed at least a week, but I found a week and a half to 2 weeks to be better."

2. Drop a Midday Session First Replace with a Meal

Wondering which feeding to drop first? Many moms advise that a midday feeding day may be the easiest. As Shauna shares: "Drop the middle of the day feedings first and supplement with formula or milk, and then the morning and bedtime feedings the last. I am on the bedtime feeding right now and can't believe I've made it this far."

If your child has started solids, many moms recommend swapping in a meal when an eliminated feeding would normally have taken place. Sarah M. recommends: "My suggestion is to start solids and let a meal at a time replace breastfeeding."

3. Limit The Length of a Session

Before cutting out a feeding, some moms recommend tapering down the amount of nursing time of that feeding. Brooke A. explains: "For a few days before totally eliminating the feeding, I limited her time nursing. The first day just by a minute or two, then by the last days [I] only allowied her to nurse for a minute or so. She had no problem with this."

4. Sippy Cup Instead of Bottle

To avoid the difficulty of yet another weaning process, some moms also recommend transitioning to a sippy cup rather than bottle. Sarah M. explains: "You don't have to go to a bottle at all. My son went straight to a sippy cup. One less thing to wean him from."

5. "Don't Offer, Don't Refuse"

An alternative to gradually eliminating one feeding at a time is the "don't offer, don't refuse" method of weaning, in which you wean your child by only breastfeeding when the child wants to. Jenna H. explains: "If she wants to nurse, so be it, but otherwise just go about your daily business and do meals and snacks in her seat." (Not all kids want to give up the breast, so this method can be slow.)

6. Hide Temptation

"You have to make sure though that they do not see your breasts (including low cut shirts) until they are used to the new schedule," Karla D. wisely notes. "All it will do is frustrate them because they know you are denying them their favorite snack :)."

7. Pay Attention to Breast Pain

Breast pain during the weaning process is typically the result of a too-sudden change in the nursing schedule. Hot showers can help your body ease into the change, but as Breanne L. warns, "If your breasts start to hurt a lot, make sure to get them checked by a doctor!" Mastitis, a breast infection, may be the culprit.

8. Be Prepared for Some Resistance

It's natural for moms to encounter some resistance from a child being weaned. Breanne L. recalls: "I started by replacing one breastfeeding session with a sippy cup filled with whole milk and did that for about 3 weeks. My son gave me a lot of resistance on that one and was mad at me for quite awhile! . By the time it came around to getting rid of the bedtime feed, my son transitioned like nothing, and he didn't even get mad!"

Related Reading

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of, and should not be attributed to, POPSUGAR.


8 Helpful Tips for Mother-Led Weaning

Whether you've breastfed your baby for 12 months or 2 years, starting the weaning process can feel daunting. Some moms advocate letting a child self-wean, but many initiate or encourage the weaning process themselves. If you're wondering how to begin and complete a parent-led weaning process, we've rounded up eight helpful tips from Circle of Moms members who've been through it.

1. Gradually Eliminate Sessions

One of the most common weaning tips moms recommend is eliminating feedings one by one over time. While the AAP suggests eliminating a feeding every 2-3 days, many Circle of Moms members recommend a longer timeline, waiting 1-3 weeks before eliminating a second feeding. As Shauna, a member of the Breastfeeding Moms community, shares: "I heard you should drop a feeding every 2-3 days too but that was not enough for me. I needed at least a week, but I found a week and a half to 2 weeks to be better."

2. Drop a Midday Session First Replace with a Meal

Wondering which feeding to drop first? Many moms advise that a midday feeding day may be the easiest. As Shauna shares: "Drop the middle of the day feedings first and supplement with formula or milk, and then the morning and bedtime feedings the last. I am on the bedtime feeding right now and can't believe I've made it this far."

If your child has started solids, many moms recommend swapping in a meal when an eliminated feeding would normally have taken place. Sarah M. recommends: "My suggestion is to start solids and let a meal at a time replace breastfeeding."

3. Limit The Length of a Session

Before cutting out a feeding, some moms recommend tapering down the amount of nursing time of that feeding. Brooke A. explains: "For a few days before totally eliminating the feeding, I limited her time nursing. The first day just by a minute or two, then by the last days [I] only allowied her to nurse for a minute or so. She had no problem with this."

4. Sippy Cup Instead of Bottle

To avoid the difficulty of yet another weaning process, some moms also recommend transitioning to a sippy cup rather than bottle. Sarah M. explains: "You don't have to go to a bottle at all. My son went straight to a sippy cup. One less thing to wean him from."

5. "Don't Offer, Don't Refuse"

An alternative to gradually eliminating one feeding at a time is the "don't offer, don't refuse" method of weaning, in which you wean your child by only breastfeeding when the child wants to. Jenna H. explains: "If she wants to nurse, so be it, but otherwise just go about your daily business and do meals and snacks in her seat." (Not all kids want to give up the breast, so this method can be slow.)

6. Hide Temptation

"You have to make sure though that they do not see your breasts (including low cut shirts) until they are used to the new schedule," Karla D. wisely notes. "All it will do is frustrate them because they know you are denying them their favorite snack :)."

7. Pay Attention to Breast Pain

Breast pain during the weaning process is typically the result of a too-sudden change in the nursing schedule. Hot showers can help your body ease into the change, but as Breanne L. warns, "If your breasts start to hurt a lot, make sure to get them checked by a doctor!" Mastitis, a breast infection, may be the culprit.

8. Be Prepared for Some Resistance

It's natural for moms to encounter some resistance from a child being weaned. Breanne L. recalls: "I started by replacing one breastfeeding session with a sippy cup filled with whole milk and did that for about 3 weeks. My son gave me a lot of resistance on that one and was mad at me for quite awhile! . By the time it came around to getting rid of the bedtime feed, my son transitioned like nothing, and he didn't even get mad!"

Related Reading

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of, and should not be attributed to, POPSUGAR.


8 Helpful Tips for Mother-Led Weaning

Whether you've breastfed your baby for 12 months or 2 years, starting the weaning process can feel daunting. Some moms advocate letting a child self-wean, but many initiate or encourage the weaning process themselves. If you're wondering how to begin and complete a parent-led weaning process, we've rounded up eight helpful tips from Circle of Moms members who've been through it.

1. Gradually Eliminate Sessions

One of the most common weaning tips moms recommend is eliminating feedings one by one over time. While the AAP suggests eliminating a feeding every 2-3 days, many Circle of Moms members recommend a longer timeline, waiting 1-3 weeks before eliminating a second feeding. As Shauna, a member of the Breastfeeding Moms community, shares: "I heard you should drop a feeding every 2-3 days too but that was not enough for me. I needed at least a week, but I found a week and a half to 2 weeks to be better."

2. Drop a Midday Session First Replace with a Meal

Wondering which feeding to drop first? Many moms advise that a midday feeding day may be the easiest. As Shauna shares: "Drop the middle of the day feedings first and supplement with formula or milk, and then the morning and bedtime feedings the last. I am on the bedtime feeding right now and can't believe I've made it this far."

If your child has started solids, many moms recommend swapping in a meal when an eliminated feeding would normally have taken place. Sarah M. recommends: "My suggestion is to start solids and let a meal at a time replace breastfeeding."

3. Limit The Length of a Session

Before cutting out a feeding, some moms recommend tapering down the amount of nursing time of that feeding. Brooke A. explains: "For a few days before totally eliminating the feeding, I limited her time nursing. The first day just by a minute or two, then by the last days [I] only allowied her to nurse for a minute or so. She had no problem with this."

4. Sippy Cup Instead of Bottle

To avoid the difficulty of yet another weaning process, some moms also recommend transitioning to a sippy cup rather than bottle. Sarah M. explains: "You don't have to go to a bottle at all. My son went straight to a sippy cup. One less thing to wean him from."

5. "Don't Offer, Don't Refuse"

An alternative to gradually eliminating one feeding at a time is the "don't offer, don't refuse" method of weaning, in which you wean your child by only breastfeeding when the child wants to. Jenna H. explains: "If she wants to nurse, so be it, but otherwise just go about your daily business and do meals and snacks in her seat." (Not all kids want to give up the breast, so this method can be slow.)

6. Hide Temptation

"You have to make sure though that they do not see your breasts (including low cut shirts) until they are used to the new schedule," Karla D. wisely notes. "All it will do is frustrate them because they know you are denying them their favorite snack :)."

7. Pay Attention to Breast Pain

Breast pain during the weaning process is typically the result of a too-sudden change in the nursing schedule. Hot showers can help your body ease into the change, but as Breanne L. warns, "If your breasts start to hurt a lot, make sure to get them checked by a doctor!" Mastitis, a breast infection, may be the culprit.

8. Be Prepared for Some Resistance

It's natural for moms to encounter some resistance from a child being weaned. Breanne L. recalls: "I started by replacing one breastfeeding session with a sippy cup filled with whole milk and did that for about 3 weeks. My son gave me a lot of resistance on that one and was mad at me for quite awhile! . By the time it came around to getting rid of the bedtime feed, my son transitioned like nothing, and he didn't even get mad!"

Related Reading

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of, and should not be attributed to, POPSUGAR.


8 Helpful Tips for Mother-Led Weaning

Whether you've breastfed your baby for 12 months or 2 years, starting the weaning process can feel daunting. Some moms advocate letting a child self-wean, but many initiate or encourage the weaning process themselves. If you're wondering how to begin and complete a parent-led weaning process, we've rounded up eight helpful tips from Circle of Moms members who've been through it.

1. Gradually Eliminate Sessions

One of the most common weaning tips moms recommend is eliminating feedings one by one over time. While the AAP suggests eliminating a feeding every 2-3 days, many Circle of Moms members recommend a longer timeline, waiting 1-3 weeks before eliminating a second feeding. As Shauna, a member of the Breastfeeding Moms community, shares: "I heard you should drop a feeding every 2-3 days too but that was not enough for me. I needed at least a week, but I found a week and a half to 2 weeks to be better."

2. Drop a Midday Session First Replace with a Meal

Wondering which feeding to drop first? Many moms advise that a midday feeding day may be the easiest. As Shauna shares: "Drop the middle of the day feedings first and supplement with formula or milk, and then the morning and bedtime feedings the last. I am on the bedtime feeding right now and can't believe I've made it this far."

If your child has started solids, many moms recommend swapping in a meal when an eliminated feeding would normally have taken place. Sarah M. recommends: "My suggestion is to start solids and let a meal at a time replace breastfeeding."

3. Limit The Length of a Session

Before cutting out a feeding, some moms recommend tapering down the amount of nursing time of that feeding. Brooke A. explains: "For a few days before totally eliminating the feeding, I limited her time nursing. The first day just by a minute or two, then by the last days [I] only allowied her to nurse for a minute or so. She had no problem with this."

4. Sippy Cup Instead of Bottle

To avoid the difficulty of yet another weaning process, some moms also recommend transitioning to a sippy cup rather than bottle. Sarah M. explains: "You don't have to go to a bottle at all. My son went straight to a sippy cup. One less thing to wean him from."

5. "Don't Offer, Don't Refuse"

An alternative to gradually eliminating one feeding at a time is the "don't offer, don't refuse" method of weaning, in which you wean your child by only breastfeeding when the child wants to. Jenna H. explains: "If she wants to nurse, so be it, but otherwise just go about your daily business and do meals and snacks in her seat." (Not all kids want to give up the breast, so this method can be slow.)

6. Hide Temptation

"You have to make sure though that they do not see your breasts (including low cut shirts) until they are used to the new schedule," Karla D. wisely notes. "All it will do is frustrate them because they know you are denying them their favorite snack :)."

7. Pay Attention to Breast Pain

Breast pain during the weaning process is typically the result of a too-sudden change in the nursing schedule. Hot showers can help your body ease into the change, but as Breanne L. warns, "If your breasts start to hurt a lot, make sure to get them checked by a doctor!" Mastitis, a breast infection, may be the culprit.

8. Be Prepared for Some Resistance

It's natural for moms to encounter some resistance from a child being weaned. Breanne L. recalls: "I started by replacing one breastfeeding session with a sippy cup filled with whole milk and did that for about 3 weeks. My son gave me a lot of resistance on that one and was mad at me for quite awhile! . By the time it came around to getting rid of the bedtime feed, my son transitioned like nothing, and he didn't even get mad!"

Related Reading

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of, and should not be attributed to, POPSUGAR.


8 Helpful Tips for Mother-Led Weaning

Whether you've breastfed your baby for 12 months or 2 years, starting the weaning process can feel daunting. Some moms advocate letting a child self-wean, but many initiate or encourage the weaning process themselves. If you're wondering how to begin and complete a parent-led weaning process, we've rounded up eight helpful tips from Circle of Moms members who've been through it.

1. Gradually Eliminate Sessions

One of the most common weaning tips moms recommend is eliminating feedings one by one over time. While the AAP suggests eliminating a feeding every 2-3 days, many Circle of Moms members recommend a longer timeline, waiting 1-3 weeks before eliminating a second feeding. As Shauna, a member of the Breastfeeding Moms community, shares: "I heard you should drop a feeding every 2-3 days too but that was not enough for me. I needed at least a week, but I found a week and a half to 2 weeks to be better."

2. Drop a Midday Session First Replace with a Meal

Wondering which feeding to drop first? Many moms advise that a midday feeding day may be the easiest. As Shauna shares: "Drop the middle of the day feedings first and supplement with formula or milk, and then the morning and bedtime feedings the last. I am on the bedtime feeding right now and can't believe I've made it this far."

If your child has started solids, many moms recommend swapping in a meal when an eliminated feeding would normally have taken place. Sarah M. recommends: "My suggestion is to start solids and let a meal at a time replace breastfeeding."

3. Limit The Length of a Session

Before cutting out a feeding, some moms recommend tapering down the amount of nursing time of that feeding. Brooke A. explains: "For a few days before totally eliminating the feeding, I limited her time nursing. The first day just by a minute or two, then by the last days [I] only allowied her to nurse for a minute or so. She had no problem with this."

4. Sippy Cup Instead of Bottle

To avoid the difficulty of yet another weaning process, some moms also recommend transitioning to a sippy cup rather than bottle. Sarah M. explains: "You don't have to go to a bottle at all. My son went straight to a sippy cup. One less thing to wean him from."

5. "Don't Offer, Don't Refuse"

An alternative to gradually eliminating one feeding at a time is the "don't offer, don't refuse" method of weaning, in which you wean your child by only breastfeeding when the child wants to. Jenna H. explains: "If she wants to nurse, so be it, but otherwise just go about your daily business and do meals and snacks in her seat." (Not all kids want to give up the breast, so this method can be slow.)

6. Hide Temptation

"You have to make sure though that they do not see your breasts (including low cut shirts) until they are used to the new schedule," Karla D. wisely notes. "All it will do is frustrate them because they know you are denying them their favorite snack :)."

7. Pay Attention to Breast Pain

Breast pain during the weaning process is typically the result of a too-sudden change in the nursing schedule. Hot showers can help your body ease into the change, but as Breanne L. warns, "If your breasts start to hurt a lot, make sure to get them checked by a doctor!" Mastitis, a breast infection, may be the culprit.

8. Be Prepared for Some Resistance

It's natural for moms to encounter some resistance from a child being weaned. Breanne L. recalls: "I started by replacing one breastfeeding session with a sippy cup filled with whole milk and did that for about 3 weeks. My son gave me a lot of resistance on that one and was mad at me for quite awhile! . By the time it came around to getting rid of the bedtime feed, my son transitioned like nothing, and he didn't even get mad!"

Related Reading

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of, and should not be attributed to, POPSUGAR.


8 Helpful Tips for Mother-Led Weaning

Whether you've breastfed your baby for 12 months or 2 years, starting the weaning process can feel daunting. Some moms advocate letting a child self-wean, but many initiate or encourage the weaning process themselves. If you're wondering how to begin and complete a parent-led weaning process, we've rounded up eight helpful tips from Circle of Moms members who've been through it.

1. Gradually Eliminate Sessions

One of the most common weaning tips moms recommend is eliminating feedings one by one over time. While the AAP suggests eliminating a feeding every 2-3 days, many Circle of Moms members recommend a longer timeline, waiting 1-3 weeks before eliminating a second feeding. As Shauna, a member of the Breastfeeding Moms community, shares: "I heard you should drop a feeding every 2-3 days too but that was not enough for me. I needed at least a week, but I found a week and a half to 2 weeks to be better."

2. Drop a Midday Session First Replace with a Meal

Wondering which feeding to drop first? Many moms advise that a midday feeding day may be the easiest. As Shauna shares: "Drop the middle of the day feedings first and supplement with formula or milk, and then the morning and bedtime feedings the last. I am on the bedtime feeding right now and can't believe I've made it this far."

If your child has started solids, many moms recommend swapping in a meal when an eliminated feeding would normally have taken place. Sarah M. recommends: "My suggestion is to start solids and let a meal at a time replace breastfeeding."

3. Limit The Length of a Session

Before cutting out a feeding, some moms recommend tapering down the amount of nursing time of that feeding. Brooke A. explains: "For a few days before totally eliminating the feeding, I limited her time nursing. The first day just by a minute or two, then by the last days [I] only allowied her to nurse for a minute or so. She had no problem with this."

4. Sippy Cup Instead of Bottle

To avoid the difficulty of yet another weaning process, some moms also recommend transitioning to a sippy cup rather than bottle. Sarah M. explains: "You don't have to go to a bottle at all. My son went straight to a sippy cup. One less thing to wean him from."

5. "Don't Offer, Don't Refuse"

An alternative to gradually eliminating one feeding at a time is the "don't offer, don't refuse" method of weaning, in which you wean your child by only breastfeeding when the child wants to. Jenna H. explains: "If she wants to nurse, so be it, but otherwise just go about your daily business and do meals and snacks in her seat." (Not all kids want to give up the breast, so this method can be slow.)

6. Hide Temptation

"You have to make sure though that they do not see your breasts (including low cut shirts) until they are used to the new schedule," Karla D. wisely notes. "All it will do is frustrate them because they know you are denying them their favorite snack :)."

7. Pay Attention to Breast Pain

Breast pain during the weaning process is typically the result of a too-sudden change in the nursing schedule. Hot showers can help your body ease into the change, but as Breanne L. warns, "If your breasts start to hurt a lot, make sure to get them checked by a doctor!" Mastitis, a breast infection, may be the culprit.

8. Be Prepared for Some Resistance

It's natural for moms to encounter some resistance from a child being weaned. Breanne L. recalls: "I started by replacing one breastfeeding session with a sippy cup filled with whole milk and did that for about 3 weeks. My son gave me a lot of resistance on that one and was mad at me for quite awhile! . By the time it came around to getting rid of the bedtime feed, my son transitioned like nothing, and he didn't even get mad!"

Related Reading

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of, and should not be attributed to, POPSUGAR.


8 Helpful Tips for Mother-Led Weaning

Whether you've breastfed your baby for 12 months or 2 years, starting the weaning process can feel daunting. Some moms advocate letting a child self-wean, but many initiate or encourage the weaning process themselves. If you're wondering how to begin and complete a parent-led weaning process, we've rounded up eight helpful tips from Circle of Moms members who've been through it.

1. Gradually Eliminate Sessions

One of the most common weaning tips moms recommend is eliminating feedings one by one over time. While the AAP suggests eliminating a feeding every 2-3 days, many Circle of Moms members recommend a longer timeline, waiting 1-3 weeks before eliminating a second feeding. As Shauna, a member of the Breastfeeding Moms community, shares: "I heard you should drop a feeding every 2-3 days too but that was not enough for me. I needed at least a week, but I found a week and a half to 2 weeks to be better."

2. Drop a Midday Session First Replace with a Meal

Wondering which feeding to drop first? Many moms advise that a midday feeding day may be the easiest. As Shauna shares: "Drop the middle of the day feedings first and supplement with formula or milk, and then the morning and bedtime feedings the last. I am on the bedtime feeding right now and can't believe I've made it this far."

If your child has started solids, many moms recommend swapping in a meal when an eliminated feeding would normally have taken place. Sarah M. recommends: "My suggestion is to start solids and let a meal at a time replace breastfeeding."

3. Limit The Length of a Session

Before cutting out a feeding, some moms recommend tapering down the amount of nursing time of that feeding. Brooke A. explains: "For a few days before totally eliminating the feeding, I limited her time nursing. The first day just by a minute or two, then by the last days [I] only allowied her to nurse for a minute or so. She had no problem with this."

4. Sippy Cup Instead of Bottle

To avoid the difficulty of yet another weaning process, some moms also recommend transitioning to a sippy cup rather than bottle. Sarah M. explains: "You don't have to go to a bottle at all. My son went straight to a sippy cup. One less thing to wean him from."

5. "Don't Offer, Don't Refuse"

An alternative to gradually eliminating one feeding at a time is the "don't offer, don't refuse" method of weaning, in which you wean your child by only breastfeeding when the child wants to. Jenna H. explains: "If she wants to nurse, so be it, but otherwise just go about your daily business and do meals and snacks in her seat." (Not all kids want to give up the breast, so this method can be slow.)

6. Hide Temptation

"You have to make sure though that they do not see your breasts (including low cut shirts) until they are used to the new schedule," Karla D. wisely notes. "All it will do is frustrate them because they know you are denying them their favorite snack :)."

7. Pay Attention to Breast Pain

Breast pain during the weaning process is typically the result of a too-sudden change in the nursing schedule. Hot showers can help your body ease into the change, but as Breanne L. warns, "If your breasts start to hurt a lot, make sure to get them checked by a doctor!" Mastitis, a breast infection, may be the culprit.

8. Be Prepared for Some Resistance

It's natural for moms to encounter some resistance from a child being weaned. Breanne L. recalls: "I started by replacing one breastfeeding session with a sippy cup filled with whole milk and did that for about 3 weeks. My son gave me a lot of resistance on that one and was mad at me for quite awhile! . By the time it came around to getting rid of the bedtime feed, my son transitioned like nothing, and he didn't even get mad!"

Related Reading

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of, and should not be attributed to, POPSUGAR.


8 Helpful Tips for Mother-Led Weaning

Whether you've breastfed your baby for 12 months or 2 years, starting the weaning process can feel daunting. Some moms advocate letting a child self-wean, but many initiate or encourage the weaning process themselves. If you're wondering how to begin and complete a parent-led weaning process, we've rounded up eight helpful tips from Circle of Moms members who've been through it.

1. Gradually Eliminate Sessions

One of the most common weaning tips moms recommend is eliminating feedings one by one over time. While the AAP suggests eliminating a feeding every 2-3 days, many Circle of Moms members recommend a longer timeline, waiting 1-3 weeks before eliminating a second feeding. As Shauna, a member of the Breastfeeding Moms community, shares: "I heard you should drop a feeding every 2-3 days too but that was not enough for me. I needed at least a week, but I found a week and a half to 2 weeks to be better."

2. Drop a Midday Session First Replace with a Meal

Wondering which feeding to drop first? Many moms advise that a midday feeding day may be the easiest. As Shauna shares: "Drop the middle of the day feedings first and supplement with formula or milk, and then the morning and bedtime feedings the last. I am on the bedtime feeding right now and can't believe I've made it this far."

If your child has started solids, many moms recommend swapping in a meal when an eliminated feeding would normally have taken place. Sarah M. recommends: "My suggestion is to start solids and let a meal at a time replace breastfeeding."

3. Limit The Length of a Session

Before cutting out a feeding, some moms recommend tapering down the amount of nursing time of that feeding. Brooke A. explains: "For a few days before totally eliminating the feeding, I limited her time nursing. The first day just by a minute or two, then by the last days [I] only allowied her to nurse for a minute or so. She had no problem with this."

4. Sippy Cup Instead of Bottle

To avoid the difficulty of yet another weaning process, some moms also recommend transitioning to a sippy cup rather than bottle. Sarah M. explains: "You don't have to go to a bottle at all. My son went straight to a sippy cup. One less thing to wean him from."

5. "Don't Offer, Don't Refuse"

An alternative to gradually eliminating one feeding at a time is the "don't offer, don't refuse" method of weaning, in which you wean your child by only breastfeeding when the child wants to. Jenna H. explains: "If she wants to nurse, so be it, but otherwise just go about your daily business and do meals and snacks in her seat." (Not all kids want to give up the breast, so this method can be slow.)

6. Hide Temptation

"You have to make sure though that they do not see your breasts (including low cut shirts) until they are used to the new schedule," Karla D. wisely notes. "All it will do is frustrate them because they know you are denying them their favorite snack :)."

7. Pay Attention to Breast Pain

Breast pain during the weaning process is typically the result of a too-sudden change in the nursing schedule. Hot showers can help your body ease into the change, but as Breanne L. warns, "If your breasts start to hurt a lot, make sure to get them checked by a doctor!" Mastitis, a breast infection, may be the culprit.

8. Be Prepared for Some Resistance

It's natural for moms to encounter some resistance from a child being weaned. Breanne L. recalls: "I started by replacing one breastfeeding session with a sippy cup filled with whole milk and did that for about 3 weeks. My son gave me a lot of resistance on that one and was mad at me for quite awhile! . By the time it came around to getting rid of the bedtime feed, my son transitioned like nothing, and he didn't even get mad!"

Related Reading

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of, and should not be attributed to, POPSUGAR.


8 Helpful Tips for Mother-Led Weaning

Whether you've breastfed your baby for 12 months or 2 years, starting the weaning process can feel daunting. Some moms advocate letting a child self-wean, but many initiate or encourage the weaning process themselves. If you're wondering how to begin and complete a parent-led weaning process, we've rounded up eight helpful tips from Circle of Moms members who've been through it.

1. Gradually Eliminate Sessions

One of the most common weaning tips moms recommend is eliminating feedings one by one over time. While the AAP suggests eliminating a feeding every 2-3 days, many Circle of Moms members recommend a longer timeline, waiting 1-3 weeks before eliminating a second feeding. As Shauna, a member of the Breastfeeding Moms community, shares: "I heard you should drop a feeding every 2-3 days too but that was not enough for me. I needed at least a week, but I found a week and a half to 2 weeks to be better."

2. Drop a Midday Session First Replace with a Meal

Wondering which feeding to drop first? Many moms advise that a midday feeding day may be the easiest. As Shauna shares: "Drop the middle of the day feedings first and supplement with formula or milk, and then the morning and bedtime feedings the last. I am on the bedtime feeding right now and can't believe I've made it this far."

If your child has started solids, many moms recommend swapping in a meal when an eliminated feeding would normally have taken place. Sarah M. recommends: "My suggestion is to start solids and let a meal at a time replace breastfeeding."

3. Limit The Length of a Session

Before cutting out a feeding, some moms recommend tapering down the amount of nursing time of that feeding. Brooke A. explains: "For a few days before totally eliminating the feeding, I limited her time nursing. The first day just by a minute or two, then by the last days [I] only allowied her to nurse for a minute or so. She had no problem with this."

4. Sippy Cup Instead of Bottle

To avoid the difficulty of yet another weaning process, some moms also recommend transitioning to a sippy cup rather than bottle. Sarah M. explains: "You don't have to go to a bottle at all. My son went straight to a sippy cup. One less thing to wean him from."

5. "Don't Offer, Don't Refuse"

An alternative to gradually eliminating one feeding at a time is the "don't offer, don't refuse" method of weaning, in which you wean your child by only breastfeeding when the child wants to. Jenna H. explains: "If she wants to nurse, so be it, but otherwise just go about your daily business and do meals and snacks in her seat." (Not all kids want to give up the breast, so this method can be slow.)

6. Hide Temptation

"You have to make sure though that they do not see your breasts (including low cut shirts) until they are used to the new schedule," Karla D. wisely notes. "All it will do is frustrate them because they know you are denying them their favorite snack :)."

7. Pay Attention to Breast Pain

Breast pain during the weaning process is typically the result of a too-sudden change in the nursing schedule. Hot showers can help your body ease into the change, but as Breanne L. warns, "If your breasts start to hurt a lot, make sure to get them checked by a doctor!" Mastitis, a breast infection, may be the culprit.

8. Be Prepared for Some Resistance

It's natural for moms to encounter some resistance from a child being weaned. Breanne L. recalls: "I started by replacing one breastfeeding session with a sippy cup filled with whole milk and did that for about 3 weeks. My son gave me a lot of resistance on that one and was mad at me for quite awhile! . By the time it came around to getting rid of the bedtime feed, my son transitioned like nothing, and he didn't even get mad!"

Related Reading

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of, and should not be attributed to, POPSUGAR.



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