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Wine Spectator’s New York Wine Experience Brings the World’s Finest Wines to The Marriott Marquis

Wine Spectator’s New York Wine Experience Brings the World’s Finest Wines to The Marriott Marquis


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The wine selection at the Grand Tasting was amazing

Dan Myers

The Grand Tasting was held in the Marriott Marquis' grand ballroom.

Haut-Brion. These are some of the finest wines in the world, and they’re all ranked 90 points or higher by Wine Spectator, making them eligible for participation in this past weekend’s 35th Annual New York Wine Experience’s Grand Tastings, the flagship event of the annual festival, which brings together hundreds of wineries and thousands of guests for classes, seminars, and a gala. 267 different wines were poured during this year’s Grand Tastings, and if there’s a finer selection of wine being poured at any festival on earth, I’d be very surprised.

For $275 per person, guests had the opportunity to mingle with wine lovers and in many cases the wine producers themselves at the massive Grand Tasting, held in the Marriott Marquis’ grand ballroom, which we were fortunate enough to have had the opportunity to attend. Along with the aforementioned wines, there was a superb selection of vintage Champagne (including Charles Heidsieck Blanc des Millenaires 1995 and Champagne Henriot 1998); Napa red (2012 Schrader T6 Beckstoffer To Kalon, 2012 Opus One, 2012 Peter Michael Les Pavots, Verite La Joie 2012); Italian nebbiolo and barolo (2011 Langhe Gaja Costa Russi, 2007 Bruno Giacosa Le Rocche del Falletto Riserva); and plenty of stunning whites, including Mount Eden Vineyards 2011 Chardonnay, 2012 Kistler Trenton Roadhouse Chardonnay, and 2009 F.E. Trimbach Riesling. Wines ranged in value from below $40 (Monte Carbonare 2012 suavia) to a $750 and up (Chateau Mouton Rothschild Pauillac 2009, $1,000; 2005 Chateau d’Yquem Sauternes, $790), with the average bottle valued at around $100.

Needless to say, the event was an embarrassment of riches, and an amazing way to sample a seemingly endless array of wines that are far beyond the everyday price range. But more than that, it was an opportunity to try some of the finest wines on earth and chat with the people who devote their lives to maintaining a level of quality that’s unattainable for the average winemaker. If you’re a wine lover, there’s no reason why this event shouldn’t be on your radar next year.


WINE TALK A 20,000-Bottle Weekend

THE next time you are trapped washing wineglasses after the guests leave, cheer up. After each big tasting at the New York Wine Experience last week, members of the staff at the Marriott Marquis Hotel had to wash and dry some 27,000 of them.

Everything at the Wine Experience, a three-day extravaganza for wine buffs, was outsize, including the number of guests. About 1,100 signed up for the whole long weekend, and an additional 1,500 turned up on either Thursday or Friday evening to sample some of the 350 wines that were being poured by representatives of 250 wineries worldwide. At several of the sit-down tastings, 1,000 participants consumed a total of more than 90 cases of wine. Twenty sommeliers worked behind the scenes, opening, decanting and pouring more than 20,000 bottles of wine over three days.

The New York Wine Experience is presented every two years by M. Shanken Communications, the publisher of Wine Spectator and other magazines. In alternate years, the California Wine Experience, mostly featuring that state's wines, has been held in San Francisco. The Wine Experience -- this was the 19th -- is the largest regularly held wine event in this country, but it is hardly a recent phenomenon, nor is it the largest worldwide.

That distinction probably goes to the Fete des Vignerons in Switzerland, which dates back to the 14th century. It is held every 22 years, most recently last summer. A theatrical spectacle as well as a wine fair, it attracted more than a million visitors to the town of Vevey over a three-week period in July and August.

The New York event also offered a banquet on Saturday featuring the singer Gladys Knight, but the main entertainment was the promotion of wines. Most of those who attended the Wine Experience were relatively sophisticated wine drinkers not too many neophytes are likely to part with $950 for the weekend. And producers eagerly showed them -- and got them to drink -- their wines.

That the participants were fairly knowledgeable was evident from the exhibitors they sought out at the Grand Tastings. A crowd at the Chateau Mouton-Rothschild booth was no surprise, especially with Baroness Philippine de Rothschild pouring, but almost as many eager fans jostled for a chance to sample Ridge Vineyards' Monte Bello cabernet sauvignon from the Santa Cruz Mountains, the premier cru Puligny-Montrachet of the Domaine Leflaive in Burgundy, and Unico, the legendary wine of Vega Sicilia in Spain.

Though guests who attended only the two Grand Tastings paid $165 each, and showed determination by waiting in long lines, they were able to taste wines worth considerably more than they paid. Besides Mouton-Rothschild, Bordeaux was represented by Chateaux d'Yquem, Margaux, Lynch-Bages and Rauzan-Segla, and Vieux-Chateau-Certan, among many others. Rare Italian wines like Angelo Gaja's Alteni di Brassica sauvignon blanc and Montevertine's Pergole Torte, from Tuscany, were available.

Five Weeknight Dishes

Emily Weinstein has menu suggestions for the week. There are thousands of ideas for what to cook waiting for you on New York Times Cooking.

    • The brilliant Kay Chun brings the flavors of Korean barbecue to the burger format in this recipe for Korean cheeseburgers.
    • Ali Slagle has a trick to get brash flavor on this ginger-lime chicken: using mayo in the marinade.
    • Yasmin Fahr stirs together thick yogurt, feta and Persian cucumbers to toss in this salmon and couscous salad.
    • This salad pizza with white beans and parmesan is a complete meal, inspired by California Pizza Kitchen.
    • The name yo po mian, a staple from the Shaanxi Province in China, means “oil-sprinkled noodles.”

    In the early days of the Wine Experience, many exhibitors were content to show their less expensive wines. Now the Wine Experience audience demands the best and, in most cases, they got it. Instead of pouring its regular brut Champagne, Veuve Clicquot poured its top-of-the-list Grande Dame. Instead of a tawny or some lesser port, the Quinta do Noval poured its vintage 1995. Each exhibitor paid $1,200 to participate and was required to bring six cases, 72 bottles, of a single wine.

    ONE enticing tasting was on Saturday morning, when guests were offered samples of wines from some of California's smallest and most sought-after producers, including Patz & Hall, Testarossa Vineyard, Flowers Vineyards and Winery, David Arthur Vineyards and Howell Mountain Vineyards. Virtually unknown to the public, these 'ɼult'' wines are the ultimate goal of wealthy collectors. As a group, the cult wines are beautifully crafted and long-lived. But their high prices reflect their scarcity as much as their quality. Some of these wineries are so small that they had to part with almost half a year's production to cover the Wine Experience's needs.

    A tasting on Saturday afternoon featured wine from five of the so-called super seconds, Bordeaux chateaus that match or better the wines of some of the famous first-growth chateaus like Margaux and Latour. Featured were the quite expensive wines of Chateaux Palmer, Leoville-Barton, Pichon-Baron, Pichon-Lalande and Cos-dɾstournel.

    The Wine Experience is a nonprofit event. Income goes to a scholarship fund to assist people studying for careers in the wine industry. Beginning next year, the California Wine Experience will begin moving from city to city nationwide. Its first stop will be New York. Bringing the California event to the East will give New York wine lovers a chance to experience some 150 California wines not normally poured at the New York Experience.

    Among the Wine Experience's biggest fans are the exhibitors. The show gives them a chance to meet many of their competitors and taste their wines, and to visit New York restaurants and perhaps drum up some trade.

    The same is true of the sommeliers, most of whom work for well-known restaurants. Saskia Schuit, who has served as a sommelier at every Wine Experience for 12 years, flies in from Amsterdam, where she is an importer and brings in many California and Washington State wines. ''This is where I find out what's going on in my trade,'' she said.

    Is the Wine Experience worth $950? The heat and the crowds can be oppressive in the Grand Tastings and the long corridors of the Marriott Marquis bear little resemblance to the Robert Mondavi Winery or Chateau Lynch-Bages, but there is probably no better way to sample so many of the world's best wines in one location.

    The three-day program was sold out by last May and the evening tastings by September. Once $950 would buy a cellarful of wine. Today it barely buys a case of good Bordeaux. Which probably makes the Wine Experience a pretty good deal.


    WINE TALK A 20,000-Bottle Weekend

    THE next time you are trapped washing wineglasses after the guests leave, cheer up. After each big tasting at the New York Wine Experience last week, members of the staff at the Marriott Marquis Hotel had to wash and dry some 27,000 of them.

    Everything at the Wine Experience, a three-day extravaganza for wine buffs, was outsize, including the number of guests. About 1,100 signed up for the whole long weekend, and an additional 1,500 turned up on either Thursday or Friday evening to sample some of the 350 wines that were being poured by representatives of 250 wineries worldwide. At several of the sit-down tastings, 1,000 participants consumed a total of more than 90 cases of wine. Twenty sommeliers worked behind the scenes, opening, decanting and pouring more than 20,000 bottles of wine over three days.

    The New York Wine Experience is presented every two years by M. Shanken Communications, the publisher of Wine Spectator and other magazines. In alternate years, the California Wine Experience, mostly featuring that state's wines, has been held in San Francisco. The Wine Experience -- this was the 19th -- is the largest regularly held wine event in this country, but it is hardly a recent phenomenon, nor is it the largest worldwide.

    That distinction probably goes to the Fete des Vignerons in Switzerland, which dates back to the 14th century. It is held every 22 years, most recently last summer. A theatrical spectacle as well as a wine fair, it attracted more than a million visitors to the town of Vevey over a three-week period in July and August.

    The New York event also offered a banquet on Saturday featuring the singer Gladys Knight, but the main entertainment was the promotion of wines. Most of those who attended the Wine Experience were relatively sophisticated wine drinkers not too many neophytes are likely to part with $950 for the weekend. And producers eagerly showed them -- and got them to drink -- their wines.

    That the participants were fairly knowledgeable was evident from the exhibitors they sought out at the Grand Tastings. A crowd at the Chateau Mouton-Rothschild booth was no surprise, especially with Baroness Philippine de Rothschild pouring, but almost as many eager fans jostled for a chance to sample Ridge Vineyards' Monte Bello cabernet sauvignon from the Santa Cruz Mountains, the premier cru Puligny-Montrachet of the Domaine Leflaive in Burgundy, and Unico, the legendary wine of Vega Sicilia in Spain.

    Though guests who attended only the two Grand Tastings paid $165 each, and showed determination by waiting in long lines, they were able to taste wines worth considerably more than they paid. Besides Mouton-Rothschild, Bordeaux was represented by Chateaux d'Yquem, Margaux, Lynch-Bages and Rauzan-Segla, and Vieux-Chateau-Certan, among many others. Rare Italian wines like Angelo Gaja's Alteni di Brassica sauvignon blanc and Montevertine's Pergole Torte, from Tuscany, were available.

    Five Weeknight Dishes

    Emily Weinstein has menu suggestions for the week. There are thousands of ideas for what to cook waiting for you on New York Times Cooking.

      • The brilliant Kay Chun brings the flavors of Korean barbecue to the burger format in this recipe for Korean cheeseburgers.
      • Ali Slagle has a trick to get brash flavor on this ginger-lime chicken: using mayo in the marinade.
      • Yasmin Fahr stirs together thick yogurt, feta and Persian cucumbers to toss in this salmon and couscous salad.
      • This salad pizza with white beans and parmesan is a complete meal, inspired by California Pizza Kitchen.
      • The name yo po mian, a staple from the Shaanxi Province in China, means “oil-sprinkled noodles.”

      In the early days of the Wine Experience, many exhibitors were content to show their less expensive wines. Now the Wine Experience audience demands the best and, in most cases, they got it. Instead of pouring its regular brut Champagne, Veuve Clicquot poured its top-of-the-list Grande Dame. Instead of a tawny or some lesser port, the Quinta do Noval poured its vintage 1995. Each exhibitor paid $1,200 to participate and was required to bring six cases, 72 bottles, of a single wine.

      ONE enticing tasting was on Saturday morning, when guests were offered samples of wines from some of California's smallest and most sought-after producers, including Patz & Hall, Testarossa Vineyard, Flowers Vineyards and Winery, David Arthur Vineyards and Howell Mountain Vineyards. Virtually unknown to the public, these 'ɼult'' wines are the ultimate goal of wealthy collectors. As a group, the cult wines are beautifully crafted and long-lived. But their high prices reflect their scarcity as much as their quality. Some of these wineries are so small that they had to part with almost half a year's production to cover the Wine Experience's needs.

      A tasting on Saturday afternoon featured wine from five of the so-called super seconds, Bordeaux chateaus that match or better the wines of some of the famous first-growth chateaus like Margaux and Latour. Featured were the quite expensive wines of Chateaux Palmer, Leoville-Barton, Pichon-Baron, Pichon-Lalande and Cos-dɾstournel.

      The Wine Experience is a nonprofit event. Income goes to a scholarship fund to assist people studying for careers in the wine industry. Beginning next year, the California Wine Experience will begin moving from city to city nationwide. Its first stop will be New York. Bringing the California event to the East will give New York wine lovers a chance to experience some 150 California wines not normally poured at the New York Experience.

      Among the Wine Experience's biggest fans are the exhibitors. The show gives them a chance to meet many of their competitors and taste their wines, and to visit New York restaurants and perhaps drum up some trade.

      The same is true of the sommeliers, most of whom work for well-known restaurants. Saskia Schuit, who has served as a sommelier at every Wine Experience for 12 years, flies in from Amsterdam, where she is an importer and brings in many California and Washington State wines. ''This is where I find out what's going on in my trade,'' she said.

      Is the Wine Experience worth $950? The heat and the crowds can be oppressive in the Grand Tastings and the long corridors of the Marriott Marquis bear little resemblance to the Robert Mondavi Winery or Chateau Lynch-Bages, but there is probably no better way to sample so many of the world's best wines in one location.

      The three-day program was sold out by last May and the evening tastings by September. Once $950 would buy a cellarful of wine. Today it barely buys a case of good Bordeaux. Which probably makes the Wine Experience a pretty good deal.


      WINE TALK A 20,000-Bottle Weekend

      THE next time you are trapped washing wineglasses after the guests leave, cheer up. After each big tasting at the New York Wine Experience last week, members of the staff at the Marriott Marquis Hotel had to wash and dry some 27,000 of them.

      Everything at the Wine Experience, a three-day extravaganza for wine buffs, was outsize, including the number of guests. About 1,100 signed up for the whole long weekend, and an additional 1,500 turned up on either Thursday or Friday evening to sample some of the 350 wines that were being poured by representatives of 250 wineries worldwide. At several of the sit-down tastings, 1,000 participants consumed a total of more than 90 cases of wine. Twenty sommeliers worked behind the scenes, opening, decanting and pouring more than 20,000 bottles of wine over three days.

      The New York Wine Experience is presented every two years by M. Shanken Communications, the publisher of Wine Spectator and other magazines. In alternate years, the California Wine Experience, mostly featuring that state's wines, has been held in San Francisco. The Wine Experience -- this was the 19th -- is the largest regularly held wine event in this country, but it is hardly a recent phenomenon, nor is it the largest worldwide.

      That distinction probably goes to the Fete des Vignerons in Switzerland, which dates back to the 14th century. It is held every 22 years, most recently last summer. A theatrical spectacle as well as a wine fair, it attracted more than a million visitors to the town of Vevey over a three-week period in July and August.

      The New York event also offered a banquet on Saturday featuring the singer Gladys Knight, but the main entertainment was the promotion of wines. Most of those who attended the Wine Experience were relatively sophisticated wine drinkers not too many neophytes are likely to part with $950 for the weekend. And producers eagerly showed them -- and got them to drink -- their wines.

      That the participants were fairly knowledgeable was evident from the exhibitors they sought out at the Grand Tastings. A crowd at the Chateau Mouton-Rothschild booth was no surprise, especially with Baroness Philippine de Rothschild pouring, but almost as many eager fans jostled for a chance to sample Ridge Vineyards' Monte Bello cabernet sauvignon from the Santa Cruz Mountains, the premier cru Puligny-Montrachet of the Domaine Leflaive in Burgundy, and Unico, the legendary wine of Vega Sicilia in Spain.

      Though guests who attended only the two Grand Tastings paid $165 each, and showed determination by waiting in long lines, they were able to taste wines worth considerably more than they paid. Besides Mouton-Rothschild, Bordeaux was represented by Chateaux d'Yquem, Margaux, Lynch-Bages and Rauzan-Segla, and Vieux-Chateau-Certan, among many others. Rare Italian wines like Angelo Gaja's Alteni di Brassica sauvignon blanc and Montevertine's Pergole Torte, from Tuscany, were available.

      Five Weeknight Dishes

      Emily Weinstein has menu suggestions for the week. There are thousands of ideas for what to cook waiting for you on New York Times Cooking.

        • The brilliant Kay Chun brings the flavors of Korean barbecue to the burger format in this recipe for Korean cheeseburgers.
        • Ali Slagle has a trick to get brash flavor on this ginger-lime chicken: using mayo in the marinade.
        • Yasmin Fahr stirs together thick yogurt, feta and Persian cucumbers to toss in this salmon and couscous salad.
        • This salad pizza with white beans and parmesan is a complete meal, inspired by California Pizza Kitchen.
        • The name yo po mian, a staple from the Shaanxi Province in China, means “oil-sprinkled noodles.”

        In the early days of the Wine Experience, many exhibitors were content to show their less expensive wines. Now the Wine Experience audience demands the best and, in most cases, they got it. Instead of pouring its regular brut Champagne, Veuve Clicquot poured its top-of-the-list Grande Dame. Instead of a tawny or some lesser port, the Quinta do Noval poured its vintage 1995. Each exhibitor paid $1,200 to participate and was required to bring six cases, 72 bottles, of a single wine.

        ONE enticing tasting was on Saturday morning, when guests were offered samples of wines from some of California's smallest and most sought-after producers, including Patz & Hall, Testarossa Vineyard, Flowers Vineyards and Winery, David Arthur Vineyards and Howell Mountain Vineyards. Virtually unknown to the public, these 'ɼult'' wines are the ultimate goal of wealthy collectors. As a group, the cult wines are beautifully crafted and long-lived. But their high prices reflect their scarcity as much as their quality. Some of these wineries are so small that they had to part with almost half a year's production to cover the Wine Experience's needs.

        A tasting on Saturday afternoon featured wine from five of the so-called super seconds, Bordeaux chateaus that match or better the wines of some of the famous first-growth chateaus like Margaux and Latour. Featured were the quite expensive wines of Chateaux Palmer, Leoville-Barton, Pichon-Baron, Pichon-Lalande and Cos-dɾstournel.

        The Wine Experience is a nonprofit event. Income goes to a scholarship fund to assist people studying for careers in the wine industry. Beginning next year, the California Wine Experience will begin moving from city to city nationwide. Its first stop will be New York. Bringing the California event to the East will give New York wine lovers a chance to experience some 150 California wines not normally poured at the New York Experience.

        Among the Wine Experience's biggest fans are the exhibitors. The show gives them a chance to meet many of their competitors and taste their wines, and to visit New York restaurants and perhaps drum up some trade.

        The same is true of the sommeliers, most of whom work for well-known restaurants. Saskia Schuit, who has served as a sommelier at every Wine Experience for 12 years, flies in from Amsterdam, where she is an importer and brings in many California and Washington State wines. ''This is where I find out what's going on in my trade,'' she said.

        Is the Wine Experience worth $950? The heat and the crowds can be oppressive in the Grand Tastings and the long corridors of the Marriott Marquis bear little resemblance to the Robert Mondavi Winery or Chateau Lynch-Bages, but there is probably no better way to sample so many of the world's best wines in one location.

        The three-day program was sold out by last May and the evening tastings by September. Once $950 would buy a cellarful of wine. Today it barely buys a case of good Bordeaux. Which probably makes the Wine Experience a pretty good deal.


        WINE TALK A 20,000-Bottle Weekend

        THE next time you are trapped washing wineglasses after the guests leave, cheer up. After each big tasting at the New York Wine Experience last week, members of the staff at the Marriott Marquis Hotel had to wash and dry some 27,000 of them.

        Everything at the Wine Experience, a three-day extravaganza for wine buffs, was outsize, including the number of guests. About 1,100 signed up for the whole long weekend, and an additional 1,500 turned up on either Thursday or Friday evening to sample some of the 350 wines that were being poured by representatives of 250 wineries worldwide. At several of the sit-down tastings, 1,000 participants consumed a total of more than 90 cases of wine. Twenty sommeliers worked behind the scenes, opening, decanting and pouring more than 20,000 bottles of wine over three days.

        The New York Wine Experience is presented every two years by M. Shanken Communications, the publisher of Wine Spectator and other magazines. In alternate years, the California Wine Experience, mostly featuring that state's wines, has been held in San Francisco. The Wine Experience -- this was the 19th -- is the largest regularly held wine event in this country, but it is hardly a recent phenomenon, nor is it the largest worldwide.

        That distinction probably goes to the Fete des Vignerons in Switzerland, which dates back to the 14th century. It is held every 22 years, most recently last summer. A theatrical spectacle as well as a wine fair, it attracted more than a million visitors to the town of Vevey over a three-week period in July and August.

        The New York event also offered a banquet on Saturday featuring the singer Gladys Knight, but the main entertainment was the promotion of wines. Most of those who attended the Wine Experience were relatively sophisticated wine drinkers not too many neophytes are likely to part with $950 for the weekend. And producers eagerly showed them -- and got them to drink -- their wines.

        That the participants were fairly knowledgeable was evident from the exhibitors they sought out at the Grand Tastings. A crowd at the Chateau Mouton-Rothschild booth was no surprise, especially with Baroness Philippine de Rothschild pouring, but almost as many eager fans jostled for a chance to sample Ridge Vineyards' Monte Bello cabernet sauvignon from the Santa Cruz Mountains, the premier cru Puligny-Montrachet of the Domaine Leflaive in Burgundy, and Unico, the legendary wine of Vega Sicilia in Spain.

        Though guests who attended only the two Grand Tastings paid $165 each, and showed determination by waiting in long lines, they were able to taste wines worth considerably more than they paid. Besides Mouton-Rothschild, Bordeaux was represented by Chateaux d'Yquem, Margaux, Lynch-Bages and Rauzan-Segla, and Vieux-Chateau-Certan, among many others. Rare Italian wines like Angelo Gaja's Alteni di Brassica sauvignon blanc and Montevertine's Pergole Torte, from Tuscany, were available.

        Five Weeknight Dishes

        Emily Weinstein has menu suggestions for the week. There are thousands of ideas for what to cook waiting for you on New York Times Cooking.

          • The brilliant Kay Chun brings the flavors of Korean barbecue to the burger format in this recipe for Korean cheeseburgers.
          • Ali Slagle has a trick to get brash flavor on this ginger-lime chicken: using mayo in the marinade.
          • Yasmin Fahr stirs together thick yogurt, feta and Persian cucumbers to toss in this salmon and couscous salad.
          • This salad pizza with white beans and parmesan is a complete meal, inspired by California Pizza Kitchen.
          • The name yo po mian, a staple from the Shaanxi Province in China, means “oil-sprinkled noodles.”

          In the early days of the Wine Experience, many exhibitors were content to show their less expensive wines. Now the Wine Experience audience demands the best and, in most cases, they got it. Instead of pouring its regular brut Champagne, Veuve Clicquot poured its top-of-the-list Grande Dame. Instead of a tawny or some lesser port, the Quinta do Noval poured its vintage 1995. Each exhibitor paid $1,200 to participate and was required to bring six cases, 72 bottles, of a single wine.

          ONE enticing tasting was on Saturday morning, when guests were offered samples of wines from some of California's smallest and most sought-after producers, including Patz & Hall, Testarossa Vineyard, Flowers Vineyards and Winery, David Arthur Vineyards and Howell Mountain Vineyards. Virtually unknown to the public, these 'ɼult'' wines are the ultimate goal of wealthy collectors. As a group, the cult wines are beautifully crafted and long-lived. But their high prices reflect their scarcity as much as their quality. Some of these wineries are so small that they had to part with almost half a year's production to cover the Wine Experience's needs.

          A tasting on Saturday afternoon featured wine from five of the so-called super seconds, Bordeaux chateaus that match or better the wines of some of the famous first-growth chateaus like Margaux and Latour. Featured were the quite expensive wines of Chateaux Palmer, Leoville-Barton, Pichon-Baron, Pichon-Lalande and Cos-dɾstournel.

          The Wine Experience is a nonprofit event. Income goes to a scholarship fund to assist people studying for careers in the wine industry. Beginning next year, the California Wine Experience will begin moving from city to city nationwide. Its first stop will be New York. Bringing the California event to the East will give New York wine lovers a chance to experience some 150 California wines not normally poured at the New York Experience.

          Among the Wine Experience's biggest fans are the exhibitors. The show gives them a chance to meet many of their competitors and taste their wines, and to visit New York restaurants and perhaps drum up some trade.

          The same is true of the sommeliers, most of whom work for well-known restaurants. Saskia Schuit, who has served as a sommelier at every Wine Experience for 12 years, flies in from Amsterdam, where she is an importer and brings in many California and Washington State wines. ''This is where I find out what's going on in my trade,'' she said.

          Is the Wine Experience worth $950? The heat and the crowds can be oppressive in the Grand Tastings and the long corridors of the Marriott Marquis bear little resemblance to the Robert Mondavi Winery or Chateau Lynch-Bages, but there is probably no better way to sample so many of the world's best wines in one location.

          The three-day program was sold out by last May and the evening tastings by September. Once $950 would buy a cellarful of wine. Today it barely buys a case of good Bordeaux. Which probably makes the Wine Experience a pretty good deal.


          WINE TALK A 20,000-Bottle Weekend

          THE next time you are trapped washing wineglasses after the guests leave, cheer up. After each big tasting at the New York Wine Experience last week, members of the staff at the Marriott Marquis Hotel had to wash and dry some 27,000 of them.

          Everything at the Wine Experience, a three-day extravaganza for wine buffs, was outsize, including the number of guests. About 1,100 signed up for the whole long weekend, and an additional 1,500 turned up on either Thursday or Friday evening to sample some of the 350 wines that were being poured by representatives of 250 wineries worldwide. At several of the sit-down tastings, 1,000 participants consumed a total of more than 90 cases of wine. Twenty sommeliers worked behind the scenes, opening, decanting and pouring more than 20,000 bottles of wine over three days.

          The New York Wine Experience is presented every two years by M. Shanken Communications, the publisher of Wine Spectator and other magazines. In alternate years, the California Wine Experience, mostly featuring that state's wines, has been held in San Francisco. The Wine Experience -- this was the 19th -- is the largest regularly held wine event in this country, but it is hardly a recent phenomenon, nor is it the largest worldwide.

          That distinction probably goes to the Fete des Vignerons in Switzerland, which dates back to the 14th century. It is held every 22 years, most recently last summer. A theatrical spectacle as well as a wine fair, it attracted more than a million visitors to the town of Vevey over a three-week period in July and August.

          The New York event also offered a banquet on Saturday featuring the singer Gladys Knight, but the main entertainment was the promotion of wines. Most of those who attended the Wine Experience were relatively sophisticated wine drinkers not too many neophytes are likely to part with $950 for the weekend. And producers eagerly showed them -- and got them to drink -- their wines.

          That the participants were fairly knowledgeable was evident from the exhibitors they sought out at the Grand Tastings. A crowd at the Chateau Mouton-Rothschild booth was no surprise, especially with Baroness Philippine de Rothschild pouring, but almost as many eager fans jostled for a chance to sample Ridge Vineyards' Monte Bello cabernet sauvignon from the Santa Cruz Mountains, the premier cru Puligny-Montrachet of the Domaine Leflaive in Burgundy, and Unico, the legendary wine of Vega Sicilia in Spain.

          Though guests who attended only the two Grand Tastings paid $165 each, and showed determination by waiting in long lines, they were able to taste wines worth considerably more than they paid. Besides Mouton-Rothschild, Bordeaux was represented by Chateaux d'Yquem, Margaux, Lynch-Bages and Rauzan-Segla, and Vieux-Chateau-Certan, among many others. Rare Italian wines like Angelo Gaja's Alteni di Brassica sauvignon blanc and Montevertine's Pergole Torte, from Tuscany, were available.

          Five Weeknight Dishes

          Emily Weinstein has menu suggestions for the week. There are thousands of ideas for what to cook waiting for you on New York Times Cooking.

            • The brilliant Kay Chun brings the flavors of Korean barbecue to the burger format in this recipe for Korean cheeseburgers.
            • Ali Slagle has a trick to get brash flavor on this ginger-lime chicken: using mayo in the marinade.
            • Yasmin Fahr stirs together thick yogurt, feta and Persian cucumbers to toss in this salmon and couscous salad.
            • This salad pizza with white beans and parmesan is a complete meal, inspired by California Pizza Kitchen.
            • The name yo po mian, a staple from the Shaanxi Province in China, means “oil-sprinkled noodles.”

            In the early days of the Wine Experience, many exhibitors were content to show their less expensive wines. Now the Wine Experience audience demands the best and, in most cases, they got it. Instead of pouring its regular brut Champagne, Veuve Clicquot poured its top-of-the-list Grande Dame. Instead of a tawny or some lesser port, the Quinta do Noval poured its vintage 1995. Each exhibitor paid $1,200 to participate and was required to bring six cases, 72 bottles, of a single wine.

            ONE enticing tasting was on Saturday morning, when guests were offered samples of wines from some of California's smallest and most sought-after producers, including Patz & Hall, Testarossa Vineyard, Flowers Vineyards and Winery, David Arthur Vineyards and Howell Mountain Vineyards. Virtually unknown to the public, these 'ɼult'' wines are the ultimate goal of wealthy collectors. As a group, the cult wines are beautifully crafted and long-lived. But their high prices reflect their scarcity as much as their quality. Some of these wineries are so small that they had to part with almost half a year's production to cover the Wine Experience's needs.

            A tasting on Saturday afternoon featured wine from five of the so-called super seconds, Bordeaux chateaus that match or better the wines of some of the famous first-growth chateaus like Margaux and Latour. Featured were the quite expensive wines of Chateaux Palmer, Leoville-Barton, Pichon-Baron, Pichon-Lalande and Cos-dɾstournel.

            The Wine Experience is a nonprofit event. Income goes to a scholarship fund to assist people studying for careers in the wine industry. Beginning next year, the California Wine Experience will begin moving from city to city nationwide. Its first stop will be New York. Bringing the California event to the East will give New York wine lovers a chance to experience some 150 California wines not normally poured at the New York Experience.

            Among the Wine Experience's biggest fans are the exhibitors. The show gives them a chance to meet many of their competitors and taste their wines, and to visit New York restaurants and perhaps drum up some trade.

            The same is true of the sommeliers, most of whom work for well-known restaurants. Saskia Schuit, who has served as a sommelier at every Wine Experience for 12 years, flies in from Amsterdam, where she is an importer and brings in many California and Washington State wines. ''This is where I find out what's going on in my trade,'' she said.

            Is the Wine Experience worth $950? The heat and the crowds can be oppressive in the Grand Tastings and the long corridors of the Marriott Marquis bear little resemblance to the Robert Mondavi Winery or Chateau Lynch-Bages, but there is probably no better way to sample so many of the world's best wines in one location.

            The three-day program was sold out by last May and the evening tastings by September. Once $950 would buy a cellarful of wine. Today it barely buys a case of good Bordeaux. Which probably makes the Wine Experience a pretty good deal.


            WINE TALK A 20,000-Bottle Weekend

            THE next time you are trapped washing wineglasses after the guests leave, cheer up. After each big tasting at the New York Wine Experience last week, members of the staff at the Marriott Marquis Hotel had to wash and dry some 27,000 of them.

            Everything at the Wine Experience, a three-day extravaganza for wine buffs, was outsize, including the number of guests. About 1,100 signed up for the whole long weekend, and an additional 1,500 turned up on either Thursday or Friday evening to sample some of the 350 wines that were being poured by representatives of 250 wineries worldwide. At several of the sit-down tastings, 1,000 participants consumed a total of more than 90 cases of wine. Twenty sommeliers worked behind the scenes, opening, decanting and pouring more than 20,000 bottles of wine over three days.

            The New York Wine Experience is presented every two years by M. Shanken Communications, the publisher of Wine Spectator and other magazines. In alternate years, the California Wine Experience, mostly featuring that state's wines, has been held in San Francisco. The Wine Experience -- this was the 19th -- is the largest regularly held wine event in this country, but it is hardly a recent phenomenon, nor is it the largest worldwide.

            That distinction probably goes to the Fete des Vignerons in Switzerland, which dates back to the 14th century. It is held every 22 years, most recently last summer. A theatrical spectacle as well as a wine fair, it attracted more than a million visitors to the town of Vevey over a three-week period in July and August.

            The New York event also offered a banquet on Saturday featuring the singer Gladys Knight, but the main entertainment was the promotion of wines. Most of those who attended the Wine Experience were relatively sophisticated wine drinkers not too many neophytes are likely to part with $950 for the weekend. And producers eagerly showed them -- and got them to drink -- their wines.

            That the participants were fairly knowledgeable was evident from the exhibitors they sought out at the Grand Tastings. A crowd at the Chateau Mouton-Rothschild booth was no surprise, especially with Baroness Philippine de Rothschild pouring, but almost as many eager fans jostled for a chance to sample Ridge Vineyards' Monte Bello cabernet sauvignon from the Santa Cruz Mountains, the premier cru Puligny-Montrachet of the Domaine Leflaive in Burgundy, and Unico, the legendary wine of Vega Sicilia in Spain.

            Though guests who attended only the two Grand Tastings paid $165 each, and showed determination by waiting in long lines, they were able to taste wines worth considerably more than they paid. Besides Mouton-Rothschild, Bordeaux was represented by Chateaux d'Yquem, Margaux, Lynch-Bages and Rauzan-Segla, and Vieux-Chateau-Certan, among many others. Rare Italian wines like Angelo Gaja's Alteni di Brassica sauvignon blanc and Montevertine's Pergole Torte, from Tuscany, were available.

            Five Weeknight Dishes

            Emily Weinstein has menu suggestions for the week. There are thousands of ideas for what to cook waiting for you on New York Times Cooking.

              • The brilliant Kay Chun brings the flavors of Korean barbecue to the burger format in this recipe for Korean cheeseburgers.
              • Ali Slagle has a trick to get brash flavor on this ginger-lime chicken: using mayo in the marinade.
              • Yasmin Fahr stirs together thick yogurt, feta and Persian cucumbers to toss in this salmon and couscous salad.
              • This salad pizza with white beans and parmesan is a complete meal, inspired by California Pizza Kitchen.
              • The name yo po mian, a staple from the Shaanxi Province in China, means “oil-sprinkled noodles.”

              In the early days of the Wine Experience, many exhibitors were content to show their less expensive wines. Now the Wine Experience audience demands the best and, in most cases, they got it. Instead of pouring its regular brut Champagne, Veuve Clicquot poured its top-of-the-list Grande Dame. Instead of a tawny or some lesser port, the Quinta do Noval poured its vintage 1995. Each exhibitor paid $1,200 to participate and was required to bring six cases, 72 bottles, of a single wine.

              ONE enticing tasting was on Saturday morning, when guests were offered samples of wines from some of California's smallest and most sought-after producers, including Patz & Hall, Testarossa Vineyard, Flowers Vineyards and Winery, David Arthur Vineyards and Howell Mountain Vineyards. Virtually unknown to the public, these 'ɼult'' wines are the ultimate goal of wealthy collectors. As a group, the cult wines are beautifully crafted and long-lived. But their high prices reflect their scarcity as much as their quality. Some of these wineries are so small that they had to part with almost half a year's production to cover the Wine Experience's needs.

              A tasting on Saturday afternoon featured wine from five of the so-called super seconds, Bordeaux chateaus that match or better the wines of some of the famous first-growth chateaus like Margaux and Latour. Featured were the quite expensive wines of Chateaux Palmer, Leoville-Barton, Pichon-Baron, Pichon-Lalande and Cos-dɾstournel.

              The Wine Experience is a nonprofit event. Income goes to a scholarship fund to assist people studying for careers in the wine industry. Beginning next year, the California Wine Experience will begin moving from city to city nationwide. Its first stop will be New York. Bringing the California event to the East will give New York wine lovers a chance to experience some 150 California wines not normally poured at the New York Experience.

              Among the Wine Experience's biggest fans are the exhibitors. The show gives them a chance to meet many of their competitors and taste their wines, and to visit New York restaurants and perhaps drum up some trade.

              The same is true of the sommeliers, most of whom work for well-known restaurants. Saskia Schuit, who has served as a sommelier at every Wine Experience for 12 years, flies in from Amsterdam, where she is an importer and brings in many California and Washington State wines. ''This is where I find out what's going on in my trade,'' she said.

              Is the Wine Experience worth $950? The heat and the crowds can be oppressive in the Grand Tastings and the long corridors of the Marriott Marquis bear little resemblance to the Robert Mondavi Winery or Chateau Lynch-Bages, but there is probably no better way to sample so many of the world's best wines in one location.

              The three-day program was sold out by last May and the evening tastings by September. Once $950 would buy a cellarful of wine. Today it barely buys a case of good Bordeaux. Which probably makes the Wine Experience a pretty good deal.


              WINE TALK A 20,000-Bottle Weekend

              THE next time you are trapped washing wineglasses after the guests leave, cheer up. After each big tasting at the New York Wine Experience last week, members of the staff at the Marriott Marquis Hotel had to wash and dry some 27,000 of them.

              Everything at the Wine Experience, a three-day extravaganza for wine buffs, was outsize, including the number of guests. About 1,100 signed up for the whole long weekend, and an additional 1,500 turned up on either Thursday or Friday evening to sample some of the 350 wines that were being poured by representatives of 250 wineries worldwide. At several of the sit-down tastings, 1,000 participants consumed a total of more than 90 cases of wine. Twenty sommeliers worked behind the scenes, opening, decanting and pouring more than 20,000 bottles of wine over three days.

              The New York Wine Experience is presented every two years by M. Shanken Communications, the publisher of Wine Spectator and other magazines. In alternate years, the California Wine Experience, mostly featuring that state's wines, has been held in San Francisco. The Wine Experience -- this was the 19th -- is the largest regularly held wine event in this country, but it is hardly a recent phenomenon, nor is it the largest worldwide.

              That distinction probably goes to the Fete des Vignerons in Switzerland, which dates back to the 14th century. It is held every 22 years, most recently last summer. A theatrical spectacle as well as a wine fair, it attracted more than a million visitors to the town of Vevey over a three-week period in July and August.

              The New York event also offered a banquet on Saturday featuring the singer Gladys Knight, but the main entertainment was the promotion of wines. Most of those who attended the Wine Experience were relatively sophisticated wine drinkers not too many neophytes are likely to part with $950 for the weekend. And producers eagerly showed them -- and got them to drink -- their wines.

              That the participants were fairly knowledgeable was evident from the exhibitors they sought out at the Grand Tastings. A crowd at the Chateau Mouton-Rothschild booth was no surprise, especially with Baroness Philippine de Rothschild pouring, but almost as many eager fans jostled for a chance to sample Ridge Vineyards' Monte Bello cabernet sauvignon from the Santa Cruz Mountains, the premier cru Puligny-Montrachet of the Domaine Leflaive in Burgundy, and Unico, the legendary wine of Vega Sicilia in Spain.

              Though guests who attended only the two Grand Tastings paid $165 each, and showed determination by waiting in long lines, they were able to taste wines worth considerably more than they paid. Besides Mouton-Rothschild, Bordeaux was represented by Chateaux d'Yquem, Margaux, Lynch-Bages and Rauzan-Segla, and Vieux-Chateau-Certan, among many others. Rare Italian wines like Angelo Gaja's Alteni di Brassica sauvignon blanc and Montevertine's Pergole Torte, from Tuscany, were available.

              Five Weeknight Dishes

              Emily Weinstein has menu suggestions for the week. There are thousands of ideas for what to cook waiting for you on New York Times Cooking.

                • The brilliant Kay Chun brings the flavors of Korean barbecue to the burger format in this recipe for Korean cheeseburgers.
                • Ali Slagle has a trick to get brash flavor on this ginger-lime chicken: using mayo in the marinade.
                • Yasmin Fahr stirs together thick yogurt, feta and Persian cucumbers to toss in this salmon and couscous salad.
                • This salad pizza with white beans and parmesan is a complete meal, inspired by California Pizza Kitchen.
                • The name yo po mian, a staple from the Shaanxi Province in China, means “oil-sprinkled noodles.”

                In the early days of the Wine Experience, many exhibitors were content to show their less expensive wines. Now the Wine Experience audience demands the best and, in most cases, they got it. Instead of pouring its regular brut Champagne, Veuve Clicquot poured its top-of-the-list Grande Dame. Instead of a tawny or some lesser port, the Quinta do Noval poured its vintage 1995. Each exhibitor paid $1,200 to participate and was required to bring six cases, 72 bottles, of a single wine.

                ONE enticing tasting was on Saturday morning, when guests were offered samples of wines from some of California's smallest and most sought-after producers, including Patz & Hall, Testarossa Vineyard, Flowers Vineyards and Winery, David Arthur Vineyards and Howell Mountain Vineyards. Virtually unknown to the public, these 'ɼult'' wines are the ultimate goal of wealthy collectors. As a group, the cult wines are beautifully crafted and long-lived. But their high prices reflect their scarcity as much as their quality. Some of these wineries are so small that they had to part with almost half a year's production to cover the Wine Experience's needs.

                A tasting on Saturday afternoon featured wine from five of the so-called super seconds, Bordeaux chateaus that match or better the wines of some of the famous first-growth chateaus like Margaux and Latour. Featured were the quite expensive wines of Chateaux Palmer, Leoville-Barton, Pichon-Baron, Pichon-Lalande and Cos-dɾstournel.

                The Wine Experience is a nonprofit event. Income goes to a scholarship fund to assist people studying for careers in the wine industry. Beginning next year, the California Wine Experience will begin moving from city to city nationwide. Its first stop will be New York. Bringing the California event to the East will give New York wine lovers a chance to experience some 150 California wines not normally poured at the New York Experience.

                Among the Wine Experience's biggest fans are the exhibitors. The show gives them a chance to meet many of their competitors and taste their wines, and to visit New York restaurants and perhaps drum up some trade.

                The same is true of the sommeliers, most of whom work for well-known restaurants. Saskia Schuit, who has served as a sommelier at every Wine Experience for 12 years, flies in from Amsterdam, where she is an importer and brings in many California and Washington State wines. ''This is where I find out what's going on in my trade,'' she said.

                Is the Wine Experience worth $950? The heat and the crowds can be oppressive in the Grand Tastings and the long corridors of the Marriott Marquis bear little resemblance to the Robert Mondavi Winery or Chateau Lynch-Bages, but there is probably no better way to sample so many of the world's best wines in one location.

                The three-day program was sold out by last May and the evening tastings by September. Once $950 would buy a cellarful of wine. Today it barely buys a case of good Bordeaux. Which probably makes the Wine Experience a pretty good deal.


                WINE TALK A 20,000-Bottle Weekend

                THE next time you are trapped washing wineglasses after the guests leave, cheer up. After each big tasting at the New York Wine Experience last week, members of the staff at the Marriott Marquis Hotel had to wash and dry some 27,000 of them.

                Everything at the Wine Experience, a three-day extravaganza for wine buffs, was outsize, including the number of guests. About 1,100 signed up for the whole long weekend, and an additional 1,500 turned up on either Thursday or Friday evening to sample some of the 350 wines that were being poured by representatives of 250 wineries worldwide. At several of the sit-down tastings, 1,000 participants consumed a total of more than 90 cases of wine. Twenty sommeliers worked behind the scenes, opening, decanting and pouring more than 20,000 bottles of wine over three days.

                The New York Wine Experience is presented every two years by M. Shanken Communications, the publisher of Wine Spectator and other magazines. In alternate years, the California Wine Experience, mostly featuring that state's wines, has been held in San Francisco. The Wine Experience -- this was the 19th -- is the largest regularly held wine event in this country, but it is hardly a recent phenomenon, nor is it the largest worldwide.

                That distinction probably goes to the Fete des Vignerons in Switzerland, which dates back to the 14th century. It is held every 22 years, most recently last summer. A theatrical spectacle as well as a wine fair, it attracted more than a million visitors to the town of Vevey over a three-week period in July and August.

                The New York event also offered a banquet on Saturday featuring the singer Gladys Knight, but the main entertainment was the promotion of wines. Most of those who attended the Wine Experience were relatively sophisticated wine drinkers not too many neophytes are likely to part with $950 for the weekend. And producers eagerly showed them -- and got them to drink -- their wines.

                That the participants were fairly knowledgeable was evident from the exhibitors they sought out at the Grand Tastings. A crowd at the Chateau Mouton-Rothschild booth was no surprise, especially with Baroness Philippine de Rothschild pouring, but almost as many eager fans jostled for a chance to sample Ridge Vineyards' Monte Bello cabernet sauvignon from the Santa Cruz Mountains, the premier cru Puligny-Montrachet of the Domaine Leflaive in Burgundy, and Unico, the legendary wine of Vega Sicilia in Spain.

                Though guests who attended only the two Grand Tastings paid $165 each, and showed determination by waiting in long lines, they were able to taste wines worth considerably more than they paid. Besides Mouton-Rothschild, Bordeaux was represented by Chateaux d'Yquem, Margaux, Lynch-Bages and Rauzan-Segla, and Vieux-Chateau-Certan, among many others. Rare Italian wines like Angelo Gaja's Alteni di Brassica sauvignon blanc and Montevertine's Pergole Torte, from Tuscany, were available.

                Five Weeknight Dishes

                Emily Weinstein has menu suggestions for the week. There are thousands of ideas for what to cook waiting for you on New York Times Cooking.

                  • The brilliant Kay Chun brings the flavors of Korean barbecue to the burger format in this recipe for Korean cheeseburgers.
                  • Ali Slagle has a trick to get brash flavor on this ginger-lime chicken: using mayo in the marinade.
                  • Yasmin Fahr stirs together thick yogurt, feta and Persian cucumbers to toss in this salmon and couscous salad.
                  • This salad pizza with white beans and parmesan is a complete meal, inspired by California Pizza Kitchen.
                  • The name yo po mian, a staple from the Shaanxi Province in China, means “oil-sprinkled noodles.”

                  In the early days of the Wine Experience, many exhibitors were content to show their less expensive wines. Now the Wine Experience audience demands the best and, in most cases, they got it. Instead of pouring its regular brut Champagne, Veuve Clicquot poured its top-of-the-list Grande Dame. Instead of a tawny or some lesser port, the Quinta do Noval poured its vintage 1995. Each exhibitor paid $1,200 to participate and was required to bring six cases, 72 bottles, of a single wine.

                  ONE enticing tasting was on Saturday morning, when guests were offered samples of wines from some of California's smallest and most sought-after producers, including Patz & Hall, Testarossa Vineyard, Flowers Vineyards and Winery, David Arthur Vineyards and Howell Mountain Vineyards. Virtually unknown to the public, these 'ɼult'' wines are the ultimate goal of wealthy collectors. As a group, the cult wines are beautifully crafted and long-lived. But their high prices reflect their scarcity as much as their quality. Some of these wineries are so small that they had to part with almost half a year's production to cover the Wine Experience's needs.

                  A tasting on Saturday afternoon featured wine from five of the so-called super seconds, Bordeaux chateaus that match or better the wines of some of the famous first-growth chateaus like Margaux and Latour. Featured were the quite expensive wines of Chateaux Palmer, Leoville-Barton, Pichon-Baron, Pichon-Lalande and Cos-dɾstournel.

                  The Wine Experience is a nonprofit event. Income goes to a scholarship fund to assist people studying for careers in the wine industry. Beginning next year, the California Wine Experience will begin moving from city to city nationwide. Its first stop will be New York. Bringing the California event to the East will give New York wine lovers a chance to experience some 150 California wines not normally poured at the New York Experience.

                  Among the Wine Experience's biggest fans are the exhibitors. The show gives them a chance to meet many of their competitors and taste their wines, and to visit New York restaurants and perhaps drum up some trade.

                  The same is true of the sommeliers, most of whom work for well-known restaurants. Saskia Schuit, who has served as a sommelier at every Wine Experience for 12 years, flies in from Amsterdam, where she is an importer and brings in many California and Washington State wines. ''This is where I find out what's going on in my trade,'' she said.

                  Is the Wine Experience worth $950? The heat and the crowds can be oppressive in the Grand Tastings and the long corridors of the Marriott Marquis bear little resemblance to the Robert Mondavi Winery or Chateau Lynch-Bages, but there is probably no better way to sample so many of the world's best wines in one location.

                  The three-day program was sold out by last May and the evening tastings by September. Once $950 would buy a cellarful of wine. Today it barely buys a case of good Bordeaux. Which probably makes the Wine Experience a pretty good deal.


                  WINE TALK A 20,000-Bottle Weekend

                  THE next time you are trapped washing wineglasses after the guests leave, cheer up. After each big tasting at the New York Wine Experience last week, members of the staff at the Marriott Marquis Hotel had to wash and dry some 27,000 of them.

                  Everything at the Wine Experience, a three-day extravaganza for wine buffs, was outsize, including the number of guests. About 1,100 signed up for the whole long weekend, and an additional 1,500 turned up on either Thursday or Friday evening to sample some of the 350 wines that were being poured by representatives of 250 wineries worldwide. At several of the sit-down tastings, 1,000 participants consumed a total of more than 90 cases of wine. Twenty sommeliers worked behind the scenes, opening, decanting and pouring more than 20,000 bottles of wine over three days.

                  The New York Wine Experience is presented every two years by M. Shanken Communications, the publisher of Wine Spectator and other magazines. In alternate years, the California Wine Experience, mostly featuring that state's wines, has been held in San Francisco. The Wine Experience -- this was the 19th -- is the largest regularly held wine event in this country, but it is hardly a recent phenomenon, nor is it the largest worldwide.

                  That distinction probably goes to the Fete des Vignerons in Switzerland, which dates back to the 14th century. It is held every 22 years, most recently last summer. A theatrical spectacle as well as a wine fair, it attracted more than a million visitors to the town of Vevey over a three-week period in July and August.

                  The New York event also offered a banquet on Saturday featuring the singer Gladys Knight, but the main entertainment was the promotion of wines. Most of those who attended the Wine Experience were relatively sophisticated wine drinkers not too many neophytes are likely to part with $950 for the weekend. And producers eagerly showed them -- and got them to drink -- their wines.

                  That the participants were fairly knowledgeable was evident from the exhibitors they sought out at the Grand Tastings. A crowd at the Chateau Mouton-Rothschild booth was no surprise, especially with Baroness Philippine de Rothschild pouring, but almost as many eager fans jostled for a chance to sample Ridge Vineyards' Monte Bello cabernet sauvignon from the Santa Cruz Mountains, the premier cru Puligny-Montrachet of the Domaine Leflaive in Burgundy, and Unico, the legendary wine of Vega Sicilia in Spain.

                  Though guests who attended only the two Grand Tastings paid $165 each, and showed determination by waiting in long lines, they were able to taste wines worth considerably more than they paid. Besides Mouton-Rothschild, Bordeaux was represented by Chateaux d'Yquem, Margaux, Lynch-Bages and Rauzan-Segla, and Vieux-Chateau-Certan, among many others. Rare Italian wines like Angelo Gaja's Alteni di Brassica sauvignon blanc and Montevertine's Pergole Torte, from Tuscany, were available.

                  Five Weeknight Dishes

                  Emily Weinstein has menu suggestions for the week. There are thousands of ideas for what to cook waiting for you on New York Times Cooking.

                    • The brilliant Kay Chun brings the flavors of Korean barbecue to the burger format in this recipe for Korean cheeseburgers.
                    • Ali Slagle has a trick to get brash flavor on this ginger-lime chicken: using mayo in the marinade.
                    • Yasmin Fahr stirs together thick yogurt, feta and Persian cucumbers to toss in this salmon and couscous salad.
                    • This salad pizza with white beans and parmesan is a complete meal, inspired by California Pizza Kitchen.
                    • The name yo po mian, a staple from the Shaanxi Province in China, means “oil-sprinkled noodles.”

                    In the early days of the Wine Experience, many exhibitors were content to show their less expensive wines. Now the Wine Experience audience demands the best and, in most cases, they got it. Instead of pouring its regular brut Champagne, Veuve Clicquot poured its top-of-the-list Grande Dame. Instead of a tawny or some lesser port, the Quinta do Noval poured its vintage 1995. Each exhibitor paid $1,200 to participate and was required to bring six cases, 72 bottles, of a single wine.

                    ONE enticing tasting was on Saturday morning, when guests were offered samples of wines from some of California's smallest and most sought-after producers, including Patz & Hall, Testarossa Vineyard, Flowers Vineyards and Winery, David Arthur Vineyards and Howell Mountain Vineyards. Virtually unknown to the public, these 'ɼult'' wines are the ultimate goal of wealthy collectors. As a group, the cult wines are beautifully crafted and long-lived. But their high prices reflect their scarcity as much as their quality. Some of these wineries are so small that they had to part with almost half a year's production to cover the Wine Experience's needs.

                    A tasting on Saturday afternoon featured wine from five of the so-called super seconds, Bordeaux chateaus that match or better the wines of some of the famous first-growth chateaus like Margaux and Latour. Featured were the quite expensive wines of Chateaux Palmer, Leoville-Barton, Pichon-Baron, Pichon-Lalande and Cos-dɾstournel.

                    The Wine Experience is a nonprofit event. Income goes to a scholarship fund to assist people studying for careers in the wine industry. Beginning next year, the California Wine Experience will begin moving from city to city nationwide. Its first stop will be New York. Bringing the California event to the East will give New York wine lovers a chance to experience some 150 California wines not normally poured at the New York Experience.

                    Among the Wine Experience's biggest fans are the exhibitors. The show gives them a chance to meet many of their competitors and taste their wines, and to visit New York restaurants and perhaps drum up some trade.

                    The same is true of the sommeliers, most of whom work for well-known restaurants. Saskia Schuit, who has served as a sommelier at every Wine Experience for 12 years, flies in from Amsterdam, where she is an importer and brings in many California and Washington State wines. ''This is where I find out what's going on in my trade,'' she said.

                    Is the Wine Experience worth $950? The heat and the crowds can be oppressive in the Grand Tastings and the long corridors of the Marriott Marquis bear little resemblance to the Robert Mondavi Winery or Chateau Lynch-Bages, but there is probably no better way to sample so many of the world's best wines in one location.

                    The three-day program was sold out by last May and the evening tastings by September. Once $950 would buy a cellarful of wine. Today it barely buys a case of good Bordeaux. Which probably makes the Wine Experience a pretty good deal.


                    WINE TALK A 20,000-Bottle Weekend

                    THE next time you are trapped washing wineglasses after the guests leave, cheer up. After each big tasting at the New York Wine Experience last week, members of the staff at the Marriott Marquis Hotel had to wash and dry some 27,000 of them.

                    Everything at the Wine Experience, a three-day extravaganza for wine buffs, was outsize, including the number of guests. About 1,100 signed up for the whole long weekend, and an additional 1,500 turned up on either Thursday or Friday evening to sample some of the 350 wines that were being poured by representatives of 250 wineries worldwide. At several of the sit-down tastings, 1,000 participants consumed a total of more than 90 cases of wine. Twenty sommeliers worked behind the scenes, opening, decanting and pouring more than 20,000 bottles of wine over three days.

                    The New York Wine Experience is presented every two years by M. Shanken Communications, the publisher of Wine Spectator and other magazines. In alternate years, the California Wine Experience, mostly featuring that state's wines, has been held in San Francisco. The Wine Experience -- this was the 19th -- is the largest regularly held wine event in this country, but it is hardly a recent phenomenon, nor is it the largest worldwide.

                    That distinction probably goes to the Fete des Vignerons in Switzerland, which dates back to the 14th century. It is held every 22 years, most recently last summer. A theatrical spectacle as well as a wine fair, it attracted more than a million visitors to the town of Vevey over a three-week period in July and August.

                    The New York event also offered a banquet on Saturday featuring the singer Gladys Knight, but the main entertainment was the promotion of wines. Most of those who attended the Wine Experience were relatively sophisticated wine drinkers not too many neophytes are likely to part with $950 for the weekend. And producers eagerly showed them -- and got them to drink -- their wines.

                    That the participants were fairly knowledgeable was evident from the exhibitors they sought out at the Grand Tastings. A crowd at the Chateau Mouton-Rothschild booth was no surprise, especially with Baroness Philippine de Rothschild pouring, but almost as many eager fans jostled for a chance to sample Ridge Vineyards' Monte Bello cabernet sauvignon from the Santa Cruz Mountains, the premier cru Puligny-Montrachet of the Domaine Leflaive in Burgundy, and Unico, the legendary wine of Vega Sicilia in Spain.

                    Though guests who attended only the two Grand Tastings paid $165 each, and showed determination by waiting in long lines, they were able to taste wines worth considerably more than they paid. Besides Mouton-Rothschild, Bordeaux was represented by Chateaux d'Yquem, Margaux, Lynch-Bages and Rauzan-Segla, and Vieux-Chateau-Certan, among many others. Rare Italian wines like Angelo Gaja's Alteni di Brassica sauvignon blanc and Montevertine's Pergole Torte, from Tuscany, were available.

                    Five Weeknight Dishes

                    Emily Weinstein has menu suggestions for the week. There are thousands of ideas for what to cook waiting for you on New York Times Cooking.

                      • The brilliant Kay Chun brings the flavors of Korean barbecue to the burger format in this recipe for Korean cheeseburgers.
                      • Ali Slagle has a trick to get brash flavor on this ginger-lime chicken: using mayo in the marinade.
                      • Yasmin Fahr stirs together thick yogurt, feta and Persian cucumbers to toss in this salmon and couscous salad.
                      • This salad pizza with white beans and parmesan is a complete meal, inspired by California Pizza Kitchen.
                      • The name yo po mian, a staple from the Shaanxi Province in China, means “oil-sprinkled noodles.”

                      In the early days of the Wine Experience, many exhibitors were content to show their less expensive wines. Now the Wine Experience audience demands the best and, in most cases, they got it. Instead of pouring its regular brut Champagne, Veuve Clicquot poured its top-of-the-list Grande Dame. Instead of a tawny or some lesser port, the Quinta do Noval poured its vintage 1995. Each exhibitor paid $1,200 to participate and was required to bring six cases, 72 bottles, of a single wine.

                      ONE enticing tasting was on Saturday morning, when guests were offered samples of wines from some of California's smallest and most sought-after producers, including Patz & Hall, Testarossa Vineyard, Flowers Vineyards and Winery, David Arthur Vineyards and Howell Mountain Vineyards. Virtually unknown to the public, these 'ɼult'' wines are the ultimate goal of wealthy collectors. As a group, the cult wines are beautifully crafted and long-lived. But their high prices reflect their scarcity as much as their quality. Some of these wineries are so small that they had to part with almost half a year's production to cover the Wine Experience's needs.

                      A tasting on Saturday afternoon featured wine from five of the so-called super seconds, Bordeaux chateaus that match or better the wines of some of the famous first-growth chateaus like Margaux and Latour. Featured were the quite expensive wines of Chateaux Palmer, Leoville-Barton, Pichon-Baron, Pichon-Lalande and Cos-dɾstournel.

                      The Wine Experience is a nonprofit event. Income goes to a scholarship fund to assist people studying for careers in the wine industry. Beginning next year, the California Wine Experience will begin moving from city to city nationwide. Its first stop will be New York. Bringing the California event to the East will give New York wine lovers a chance to experience some 150 California wines not normally poured at the New York Experience.

                      Among the Wine Experience's biggest fans are the exhibitors. The show gives them a chance to meet many of their competitors and taste their wines, and to visit New York restaurants and perhaps drum up some trade.

                      The same is true of the sommeliers, most of whom work for well-known restaurants. Saskia Schuit, who has served as a sommelier at every Wine Experience for 12 years, flies in from Amsterdam, where she is an importer and brings in many California and Washington State wines. ''This is where I find out what's going on in my trade,'' she said.

                      Is the Wine Experience worth $950? The heat and the crowds can be oppressive in the Grand Tastings and the long corridors of the Marriott Marquis bear little resemblance to the Robert Mondavi Winery or Chateau Lynch-Bages, but there is probably no better way to sample so many of the world's best wines in one location.

                      The three-day program was sold out by last May and the evening tastings by September. Once $950 would buy a cellarful of wine. Today it barely buys a case of good Bordeaux. Which probably makes the Wine Experience a pretty good deal.


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