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Take Our Survey: Where Can You Find America’s Best Burrito?

Take Our Survey: Where Can You Find America’s Best Burrito?


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A well-made burrito is a work of art, and we want to know what your favorites are

Just look at this bundle of perfection.

A well-made burrito is one of those perfect foods. For the past several years we’ve been ranking the absolute best burritos in America, and this time around we’re asking you to take our survey before noon on Wednesday, September 14 and let us know which burritos are your absolute favorites.

Take the Survey: America’s Best Burritos 2016

There’s no other food that’s quite as wonderful as a perfect burrito. It’s a tidy cylinder of joy tightly wrapped up in aluminum foil, filled to nearly bursting with your choice of rice; beans; cheese; meats like carnitas, barbacoa, and chicken mole; vegetables; guacamole; crema; and maybe some hot sauce — all the flavors co-mingle to create a flavor bomb that’s customized precisely to your liking.

You’d be hard-pressed to meet someone who flat-out doesn’t like burritos, and everyone has his/her favorite local burrito spot. Certain parts of the country are more blessed with a wide variety of independent burrito spots, but even burrito chains like Chipotle and Qdoba are turning out high-quality creations with an emphasis on freshness and flavor. (For this ranking’s purposes, we’re only including non-chains.)

We’re living in a burrito renaissance, and for that we should all be very happy. Click here to take our survey, check out last year’s ranking here, and check back later this month to see if your favorite spot came out on top!


Food & Wine Best New Restaurants 2020

I spent the first half of the month of February on my final leg of nearly five months of travel and research for this year’s Best New Restaurants list. As I bopped in and out of restaurants in the Pacific Northwest, my biggest concerns were avoiding traffic and making my reservations on time. COVID-19 was just a blip on the radar, a scary virus that was oceans away. Little could I imagine that just a few weeks later, life as we knew it would come to a screeching halt, and restaurants as we knew them would cease to exist those bustling dining rooms I was so eager to visit would soon turn eerily𠅊nd, in some cases, permanently—silent.

To be perfectly frank, my Food & Wine colleagues and I have spent the months since I wrapped my research debating the merits of list-making as a pandemic rages on throughout the world and people take to the streets to push back against police brutality and systemic racism. Restaurants—whether they are fine dining or casual, big or small𠅊re fighting tooth and nail to survive. Do we really need a list of the country’s best new restaurants, or chefs, right now at this moment in our country’s history? 

I say yes. A pandemic doesn’t cancel the work that these remarkable chefs and restaurant owners have done over the past year. Maybe these sorts of declarations are cliché at this point, but it was truly an incredible year for dining in America. Diners were spoiled for options, most at incredibly affordable price points. I still think about the cozy Burmese dinner I ate at Washington, D.C.’s Thamee𠅊 parade of hits, including a deeply satisfying, slightly tannic tea leaf salad. I still dream of the showstopping tom yum soup, overflowing with aromatics and giant prawns, that I scarfed down at Kalaya in Philadelphia. I would pay a very large sum of money to once again spend an afternoon tearing through a plate of duck confit tacos at Nixta Taqueria in Austin. 

It was deeply important to me, in my first year as a restaurant editor, to expand the definition of what gets to count as a �st new restaurant.” The idea that a restaurant had to be a place with four walls, a front door, and daily hours felt limiting. It also didn’t feel equitable. Not everyone can afford to open a brick-and-mortar spot. Not everyone wants to. But to ignore the creativity and sheer flavor that comes out of food stands, pop-ups, and trucks felt like a giant missed opportunity. As long as a concept was regularly accessible by diners, it was fair game. 

Food & Wine is partnering with Southern Smoke Foundation to help raise money for restaurant workers around the country who are in crisis. Please consider making a donation today.

That decision paid off in droves, surfacing gems like El Ruso, a taco truck in Los Angeles that serves flour tortillas so tender they will make you weep and offers the kind of hospitality that is so rooted in generosity, you can’t teach it. It also brought me to food halls, namely one in Chicago, where a stand called Thattu was serving up some of the most exciting, and comforting, Indian food in the country. 

The more I thought about it, the more imperative it felt to publish this list this year. The restaurant industry is a notoriously difficult business in the best of circumstances, with many restaurants shuttering just a couple years after opening. So for these 10 restaurants to open their doors and face an industry-shifting pandemic head-on in their first year of business is an uphill battle to say the least. In a restaurant’s first year, the team is just finding their rhythm. They are just starting to develop regulars, but they don’t have the same loyal customer base a restaurant that has been open for a decade might have. In the first year, many owners are still paying off the debts they incurred to open their restaurant in the first place. 

Still, in the midst of everything, these restaurants quickly pivoted, finding different ways to support and feed their communities. For example, chef Sam Yoo and his team quickly changed the menu of Asian-influenced diner hits at Golden Diner to be not only delivery friendly but also extremely affordable, creating specials that are just $7. Mason Hereford, the chef and owner of Molly’s Rise and Shine in New Orleans, decided to stop cooking his menu of gonzo breakfast items and turn his efforts to lobbying for the restaurant industry instead. And chef Lincoln Carson—the chef responsible for some of the best pastries I’ve ever had—tried to save his restaurant Bon Temps by serving family-style takeout meals but eventually had to make the decision to permanently call it quits. 

So this year, with this Best New Restaurants list, we honor their hard work, their dedication to their communities, and the reality that they may not all survive. 


Food & Wine Best New Restaurants 2020

I spent the first half of the month of February on my final leg of nearly five months of travel and research for this year’s Best New Restaurants list. As I bopped in and out of restaurants in the Pacific Northwest, my biggest concerns were avoiding traffic and making my reservations on time. COVID-19 was just a blip on the radar, a scary virus that was oceans away. Little could I imagine that just a few weeks later, life as we knew it would come to a screeching halt, and restaurants as we knew them would cease to exist those bustling dining rooms I was so eager to visit would soon turn eerily𠅊nd, in some cases, permanently—silent.

To be perfectly frank, my Food & Wine colleagues and I have spent the months since I wrapped my research debating the merits of list-making as a pandemic rages on throughout the world and people take to the streets to push back against police brutality and systemic racism. Restaurants—whether they are fine dining or casual, big or small𠅊re fighting tooth and nail to survive. Do we really need a list of the country’s best new restaurants, or chefs, right now at this moment in our country’s history? 

I say yes. A pandemic doesn’t cancel the work that these remarkable chefs and restaurant owners have done over the past year. Maybe these sorts of declarations are cliché at this point, but it was truly an incredible year for dining in America. Diners were spoiled for options, most at incredibly affordable price points. I still think about the cozy Burmese dinner I ate at Washington, D.C.’s Thamee𠅊 parade of hits, including a deeply satisfying, slightly tannic tea leaf salad. I still dream of the showstopping tom yum soup, overflowing with aromatics and giant prawns, that I scarfed down at Kalaya in Philadelphia. I would pay a very large sum of money to once again spend an afternoon tearing through a plate of duck confit tacos at Nixta Taqueria in Austin. 

It was deeply important to me, in my first year as a restaurant editor, to expand the definition of what gets to count as a �st new restaurant.” The idea that a restaurant had to be a place with four walls, a front door, and daily hours felt limiting. It also didn’t feel equitable. Not everyone can afford to open a brick-and-mortar spot. Not everyone wants to. But to ignore the creativity and sheer flavor that comes out of food stands, pop-ups, and trucks felt like a giant missed opportunity. As long as a concept was regularly accessible by diners, it was fair game. 

Food & Wine is partnering with Southern Smoke Foundation to help raise money for restaurant workers around the country who are in crisis. Please consider making a donation today.

That decision paid off in droves, surfacing gems like El Ruso, a taco truck in Los Angeles that serves flour tortillas so tender they will make you weep and offers the kind of hospitality that is so rooted in generosity, you can’t teach it. It also brought me to food halls, namely one in Chicago, where a stand called Thattu was serving up some of the most exciting, and comforting, Indian food in the country. 

The more I thought about it, the more imperative it felt to publish this list this year. The restaurant industry is a notoriously difficult business in the best of circumstances, with many restaurants shuttering just a couple years after opening. So for these 10 restaurants to open their doors and face an industry-shifting pandemic head-on in their first year of business is an uphill battle to say the least. In a restaurant’s first year, the team is just finding their rhythm. They are just starting to develop regulars, but they don’t have the same loyal customer base a restaurant that has been open for a decade might have. In the first year, many owners are still paying off the debts they incurred to open their restaurant in the first place. 

Still, in the midst of everything, these restaurants quickly pivoted, finding different ways to support and feed their communities. For example, chef Sam Yoo and his team quickly changed the menu of Asian-influenced diner hits at Golden Diner to be not only delivery friendly but also extremely affordable, creating specials that are just $7. Mason Hereford, the chef and owner of Molly’s Rise and Shine in New Orleans, decided to stop cooking his menu of gonzo breakfast items and turn his efforts to lobbying for the restaurant industry instead. And chef Lincoln Carson—the chef responsible for some of the best pastries I’ve ever had—tried to save his restaurant Bon Temps by serving family-style takeout meals but eventually had to make the decision to permanently call it quits. 

So this year, with this Best New Restaurants list, we honor their hard work, their dedication to their communities, and the reality that they may not all survive. 


Food & Wine Best New Restaurants 2020

I spent the first half of the month of February on my final leg of nearly five months of travel and research for this year’s Best New Restaurants list. As I bopped in and out of restaurants in the Pacific Northwest, my biggest concerns were avoiding traffic and making my reservations on time. COVID-19 was just a blip on the radar, a scary virus that was oceans away. Little could I imagine that just a few weeks later, life as we knew it would come to a screeching halt, and restaurants as we knew them would cease to exist those bustling dining rooms I was so eager to visit would soon turn eerily𠅊nd, in some cases, permanently—silent.

To be perfectly frank, my Food & Wine colleagues and I have spent the months since I wrapped my research debating the merits of list-making as a pandemic rages on throughout the world and people take to the streets to push back against police brutality and systemic racism. Restaurants—whether they are fine dining or casual, big or small𠅊re fighting tooth and nail to survive. Do we really need a list of the country’s best new restaurants, or chefs, right now at this moment in our country’s history? 

I say yes. A pandemic doesn’t cancel the work that these remarkable chefs and restaurant owners have done over the past year. Maybe these sorts of declarations are cliché at this point, but it was truly an incredible year for dining in America. Diners were spoiled for options, most at incredibly affordable price points. I still think about the cozy Burmese dinner I ate at Washington, D.C.’s Thamee𠅊 parade of hits, including a deeply satisfying, slightly tannic tea leaf salad. I still dream of the showstopping tom yum soup, overflowing with aromatics and giant prawns, that I scarfed down at Kalaya in Philadelphia. I would pay a very large sum of money to once again spend an afternoon tearing through a plate of duck confit tacos at Nixta Taqueria in Austin. 

It was deeply important to me, in my first year as a restaurant editor, to expand the definition of what gets to count as a �st new restaurant.” The idea that a restaurant had to be a place with four walls, a front door, and daily hours felt limiting. It also didn’t feel equitable. Not everyone can afford to open a brick-and-mortar spot. Not everyone wants to. But to ignore the creativity and sheer flavor that comes out of food stands, pop-ups, and trucks felt like a giant missed opportunity. As long as a concept was regularly accessible by diners, it was fair game. 

Food & Wine is partnering with Southern Smoke Foundation to help raise money for restaurant workers around the country who are in crisis. Please consider making a donation today.

That decision paid off in droves, surfacing gems like El Ruso, a taco truck in Los Angeles that serves flour tortillas so tender they will make you weep and offers the kind of hospitality that is so rooted in generosity, you can’t teach it. It also brought me to food halls, namely one in Chicago, where a stand called Thattu was serving up some of the most exciting, and comforting, Indian food in the country. 

The more I thought about it, the more imperative it felt to publish this list this year. The restaurant industry is a notoriously difficult business in the best of circumstances, with many restaurants shuttering just a couple years after opening. So for these 10 restaurants to open their doors and face an industry-shifting pandemic head-on in their first year of business is an uphill battle to say the least. In a restaurant’s first year, the team is just finding their rhythm. They are just starting to develop regulars, but they don’t have the same loyal customer base a restaurant that has been open for a decade might have. In the first year, many owners are still paying off the debts they incurred to open their restaurant in the first place. 

Still, in the midst of everything, these restaurants quickly pivoted, finding different ways to support and feed their communities. For example, chef Sam Yoo and his team quickly changed the menu of Asian-influenced diner hits at Golden Diner to be not only delivery friendly but also extremely affordable, creating specials that are just $7. Mason Hereford, the chef and owner of Molly’s Rise and Shine in New Orleans, decided to stop cooking his menu of gonzo breakfast items and turn his efforts to lobbying for the restaurant industry instead. And chef Lincoln Carson—the chef responsible for some of the best pastries I’ve ever had—tried to save his restaurant Bon Temps by serving family-style takeout meals but eventually had to make the decision to permanently call it quits. 

So this year, with this Best New Restaurants list, we honor their hard work, their dedication to their communities, and the reality that they may not all survive. 


Food & Wine Best New Restaurants 2020

I spent the first half of the month of February on my final leg of nearly five months of travel and research for this year’s Best New Restaurants list. As I bopped in and out of restaurants in the Pacific Northwest, my biggest concerns were avoiding traffic and making my reservations on time. COVID-19 was just a blip on the radar, a scary virus that was oceans away. Little could I imagine that just a few weeks later, life as we knew it would come to a screeching halt, and restaurants as we knew them would cease to exist those bustling dining rooms I was so eager to visit would soon turn eerily𠅊nd, in some cases, permanently—silent.

To be perfectly frank, my Food & Wine colleagues and I have spent the months since I wrapped my research debating the merits of list-making as a pandemic rages on throughout the world and people take to the streets to push back against police brutality and systemic racism. Restaurants—whether they are fine dining or casual, big or small𠅊re fighting tooth and nail to survive. Do we really need a list of the country’s best new restaurants, or chefs, right now at this moment in our country’s history? 

I say yes. A pandemic doesn’t cancel the work that these remarkable chefs and restaurant owners have done over the past year. Maybe these sorts of declarations are cliché at this point, but it was truly an incredible year for dining in America. Diners were spoiled for options, most at incredibly affordable price points. I still think about the cozy Burmese dinner I ate at Washington, D.C.’s Thamee𠅊 parade of hits, including a deeply satisfying, slightly tannic tea leaf salad. I still dream of the showstopping tom yum soup, overflowing with aromatics and giant prawns, that I scarfed down at Kalaya in Philadelphia. I would pay a very large sum of money to once again spend an afternoon tearing through a plate of duck confit tacos at Nixta Taqueria in Austin. 

It was deeply important to me, in my first year as a restaurant editor, to expand the definition of what gets to count as a �st new restaurant.” The idea that a restaurant had to be a place with four walls, a front door, and daily hours felt limiting. It also didn’t feel equitable. Not everyone can afford to open a brick-and-mortar spot. Not everyone wants to. But to ignore the creativity and sheer flavor that comes out of food stands, pop-ups, and trucks felt like a giant missed opportunity. As long as a concept was regularly accessible by diners, it was fair game. 

Food & Wine is partnering with Southern Smoke Foundation to help raise money for restaurant workers around the country who are in crisis. Please consider making a donation today.

That decision paid off in droves, surfacing gems like El Ruso, a taco truck in Los Angeles that serves flour tortillas so tender they will make you weep and offers the kind of hospitality that is so rooted in generosity, you can’t teach it. It also brought me to food halls, namely one in Chicago, where a stand called Thattu was serving up some of the most exciting, and comforting, Indian food in the country. 

The more I thought about it, the more imperative it felt to publish this list this year. The restaurant industry is a notoriously difficult business in the best of circumstances, with many restaurants shuttering just a couple years after opening. So for these 10 restaurants to open their doors and face an industry-shifting pandemic head-on in their first year of business is an uphill battle to say the least. In a restaurant’s first year, the team is just finding their rhythm. They are just starting to develop regulars, but they don’t have the same loyal customer base a restaurant that has been open for a decade might have. In the first year, many owners are still paying off the debts they incurred to open their restaurant in the first place. 

Still, in the midst of everything, these restaurants quickly pivoted, finding different ways to support and feed their communities. For example, chef Sam Yoo and his team quickly changed the menu of Asian-influenced diner hits at Golden Diner to be not only delivery friendly but also extremely affordable, creating specials that are just $7. Mason Hereford, the chef and owner of Molly’s Rise and Shine in New Orleans, decided to stop cooking his menu of gonzo breakfast items and turn his efforts to lobbying for the restaurant industry instead. And chef Lincoln Carson—the chef responsible for some of the best pastries I’ve ever had—tried to save his restaurant Bon Temps by serving family-style takeout meals but eventually had to make the decision to permanently call it quits. 

So this year, with this Best New Restaurants list, we honor their hard work, their dedication to their communities, and the reality that they may not all survive. 


Food & Wine Best New Restaurants 2020

I spent the first half of the month of February on my final leg of nearly five months of travel and research for this year’s Best New Restaurants list. As I bopped in and out of restaurants in the Pacific Northwest, my biggest concerns were avoiding traffic and making my reservations on time. COVID-19 was just a blip on the radar, a scary virus that was oceans away. Little could I imagine that just a few weeks later, life as we knew it would come to a screeching halt, and restaurants as we knew them would cease to exist those bustling dining rooms I was so eager to visit would soon turn eerily𠅊nd, in some cases, permanently—silent.

To be perfectly frank, my Food & Wine colleagues and I have spent the months since I wrapped my research debating the merits of list-making as a pandemic rages on throughout the world and people take to the streets to push back against police brutality and systemic racism. Restaurants—whether they are fine dining or casual, big or small𠅊re fighting tooth and nail to survive. Do we really need a list of the country’s best new restaurants, or chefs, right now at this moment in our country’s history? 

I say yes. A pandemic doesn’t cancel the work that these remarkable chefs and restaurant owners have done over the past year. Maybe these sorts of declarations are cliché at this point, but it was truly an incredible year for dining in America. Diners were spoiled for options, most at incredibly affordable price points. I still think about the cozy Burmese dinner I ate at Washington, D.C.’s Thamee𠅊 parade of hits, including a deeply satisfying, slightly tannic tea leaf salad. I still dream of the showstopping tom yum soup, overflowing with aromatics and giant prawns, that I scarfed down at Kalaya in Philadelphia. I would pay a very large sum of money to once again spend an afternoon tearing through a plate of duck confit tacos at Nixta Taqueria in Austin. 

It was deeply important to me, in my first year as a restaurant editor, to expand the definition of what gets to count as a �st new restaurant.” The idea that a restaurant had to be a place with four walls, a front door, and daily hours felt limiting. It also didn’t feel equitable. Not everyone can afford to open a brick-and-mortar spot. Not everyone wants to. But to ignore the creativity and sheer flavor that comes out of food stands, pop-ups, and trucks felt like a giant missed opportunity. As long as a concept was regularly accessible by diners, it was fair game. 

Food & Wine is partnering with Southern Smoke Foundation to help raise money for restaurant workers around the country who are in crisis. Please consider making a donation today.

That decision paid off in droves, surfacing gems like El Ruso, a taco truck in Los Angeles that serves flour tortillas so tender they will make you weep and offers the kind of hospitality that is so rooted in generosity, you can’t teach it. It also brought me to food halls, namely one in Chicago, where a stand called Thattu was serving up some of the most exciting, and comforting, Indian food in the country. 

The more I thought about it, the more imperative it felt to publish this list this year. The restaurant industry is a notoriously difficult business in the best of circumstances, with many restaurants shuttering just a couple years after opening. So for these 10 restaurants to open their doors and face an industry-shifting pandemic head-on in their first year of business is an uphill battle to say the least. In a restaurant’s first year, the team is just finding their rhythm. They are just starting to develop regulars, but they don’t have the same loyal customer base a restaurant that has been open for a decade might have. In the first year, many owners are still paying off the debts they incurred to open their restaurant in the first place. 

Still, in the midst of everything, these restaurants quickly pivoted, finding different ways to support and feed their communities. For example, chef Sam Yoo and his team quickly changed the menu of Asian-influenced diner hits at Golden Diner to be not only delivery friendly but also extremely affordable, creating specials that are just $7. Mason Hereford, the chef and owner of Molly’s Rise and Shine in New Orleans, decided to stop cooking his menu of gonzo breakfast items and turn his efforts to lobbying for the restaurant industry instead. And chef Lincoln Carson—the chef responsible for some of the best pastries I’ve ever had—tried to save his restaurant Bon Temps by serving family-style takeout meals but eventually had to make the decision to permanently call it quits. 

So this year, with this Best New Restaurants list, we honor their hard work, their dedication to their communities, and the reality that they may not all survive. 


Food & Wine Best New Restaurants 2020

I spent the first half of the month of February on my final leg of nearly five months of travel and research for this year’s Best New Restaurants list. As I bopped in and out of restaurants in the Pacific Northwest, my biggest concerns were avoiding traffic and making my reservations on time. COVID-19 was just a blip on the radar, a scary virus that was oceans away. Little could I imagine that just a few weeks later, life as we knew it would come to a screeching halt, and restaurants as we knew them would cease to exist those bustling dining rooms I was so eager to visit would soon turn eerily𠅊nd, in some cases, permanently—silent.

To be perfectly frank, my Food & Wine colleagues and I have spent the months since I wrapped my research debating the merits of list-making as a pandemic rages on throughout the world and people take to the streets to push back against police brutality and systemic racism. Restaurants—whether they are fine dining or casual, big or small𠅊re fighting tooth and nail to survive. Do we really need a list of the country’s best new restaurants, or chefs, right now at this moment in our country’s history? 

I say yes. A pandemic doesn’t cancel the work that these remarkable chefs and restaurant owners have done over the past year. Maybe these sorts of declarations are cliché at this point, but it was truly an incredible year for dining in America. Diners were spoiled for options, most at incredibly affordable price points. I still think about the cozy Burmese dinner I ate at Washington, D.C.’s Thamee𠅊 parade of hits, including a deeply satisfying, slightly tannic tea leaf salad. I still dream of the showstopping tom yum soup, overflowing with aromatics and giant prawns, that I scarfed down at Kalaya in Philadelphia. I would pay a very large sum of money to once again spend an afternoon tearing through a plate of duck confit tacos at Nixta Taqueria in Austin. 

It was deeply important to me, in my first year as a restaurant editor, to expand the definition of what gets to count as a �st new restaurant.” The idea that a restaurant had to be a place with four walls, a front door, and daily hours felt limiting. It also didn’t feel equitable. Not everyone can afford to open a brick-and-mortar spot. Not everyone wants to. But to ignore the creativity and sheer flavor that comes out of food stands, pop-ups, and trucks felt like a giant missed opportunity. As long as a concept was regularly accessible by diners, it was fair game. 

Food & Wine is partnering with Southern Smoke Foundation to help raise money for restaurant workers around the country who are in crisis. Please consider making a donation today.

That decision paid off in droves, surfacing gems like El Ruso, a taco truck in Los Angeles that serves flour tortillas so tender they will make you weep and offers the kind of hospitality that is so rooted in generosity, you can’t teach it. It also brought me to food halls, namely one in Chicago, where a stand called Thattu was serving up some of the most exciting, and comforting, Indian food in the country. 

The more I thought about it, the more imperative it felt to publish this list this year. The restaurant industry is a notoriously difficult business in the best of circumstances, with many restaurants shuttering just a couple years after opening. So for these 10 restaurants to open their doors and face an industry-shifting pandemic head-on in their first year of business is an uphill battle to say the least. In a restaurant’s first year, the team is just finding their rhythm. They are just starting to develop regulars, but they don’t have the same loyal customer base a restaurant that has been open for a decade might have. In the first year, many owners are still paying off the debts they incurred to open their restaurant in the first place. 

Still, in the midst of everything, these restaurants quickly pivoted, finding different ways to support and feed their communities. For example, chef Sam Yoo and his team quickly changed the menu of Asian-influenced diner hits at Golden Diner to be not only delivery friendly but also extremely affordable, creating specials that are just $7. Mason Hereford, the chef and owner of Molly’s Rise and Shine in New Orleans, decided to stop cooking his menu of gonzo breakfast items and turn his efforts to lobbying for the restaurant industry instead. And chef Lincoln Carson—the chef responsible for some of the best pastries I’ve ever had—tried to save his restaurant Bon Temps by serving family-style takeout meals but eventually had to make the decision to permanently call it quits. 

So this year, with this Best New Restaurants list, we honor their hard work, their dedication to their communities, and the reality that they may not all survive. 


Food & Wine Best New Restaurants 2020

I spent the first half of the month of February on my final leg of nearly five months of travel and research for this year’s Best New Restaurants list. As I bopped in and out of restaurants in the Pacific Northwest, my biggest concerns were avoiding traffic and making my reservations on time. COVID-19 was just a blip on the radar, a scary virus that was oceans away. Little could I imagine that just a few weeks later, life as we knew it would come to a screeching halt, and restaurants as we knew them would cease to exist those bustling dining rooms I was so eager to visit would soon turn eerily𠅊nd, in some cases, permanently—silent.

To be perfectly frank, my Food & Wine colleagues and I have spent the months since I wrapped my research debating the merits of list-making as a pandemic rages on throughout the world and people take to the streets to push back against police brutality and systemic racism. Restaurants—whether they are fine dining or casual, big or small𠅊re fighting tooth and nail to survive. Do we really need a list of the country’s best new restaurants, or chefs, right now at this moment in our country’s history? 

I say yes. A pandemic doesn’t cancel the work that these remarkable chefs and restaurant owners have done over the past year. Maybe these sorts of declarations are cliché at this point, but it was truly an incredible year for dining in America. Diners were spoiled for options, most at incredibly affordable price points. I still think about the cozy Burmese dinner I ate at Washington, D.C.’s Thamee𠅊 parade of hits, including a deeply satisfying, slightly tannic tea leaf salad. I still dream of the showstopping tom yum soup, overflowing with aromatics and giant prawns, that I scarfed down at Kalaya in Philadelphia. I would pay a very large sum of money to once again spend an afternoon tearing through a plate of duck confit tacos at Nixta Taqueria in Austin. 

It was deeply important to me, in my first year as a restaurant editor, to expand the definition of what gets to count as a �st new restaurant.” The idea that a restaurant had to be a place with four walls, a front door, and daily hours felt limiting. It also didn’t feel equitable. Not everyone can afford to open a brick-and-mortar spot. Not everyone wants to. But to ignore the creativity and sheer flavor that comes out of food stands, pop-ups, and trucks felt like a giant missed opportunity. As long as a concept was regularly accessible by diners, it was fair game. 

Food & Wine is partnering with Southern Smoke Foundation to help raise money for restaurant workers around the country who are in crisis. Please consider making a donation today.

That decision paid off in droves, surfacing gems like El Ruso, a taco truck in Los Angeles that serves flour tortillas so tender they will make you weep and offers the kind of hospitality that is so rooted in generosity, you can’t teach it. It also brought me to food halls, namely one in Chicago, where a stand called Thattu was serving up some of the most exciting, and comforting, Indian food in the country. 

The more I thought about it, the more imperative it felt to publish this list this year. The restaurant industry is a notoriously difficult business in the best of circumstances, with many restaurants shuttering just a couple years after opening. So for these 10 restaurants to open their doors and face an industry-shifting pandemic head-on in their first year of business is an uphill battle to say the least. In a restaurant’s first year, the team is just finding their rhythm. They are just starting to develop regulars, but they don’t have the same loyal customer base a restaurant that has been open for a decade might have. In the first year, many owners are still paying off the debts they incurred to open their restaurant in the first place. 

Still, in the midst of everything, these restaurants quickly pivoted, finding different ways to support and feed their communities. For example, chef Sam Yoo and his team quickly changed the menu of Asian-influenced diner hits at Golden Diner to be not only delivery friendly but also extremely affordable, creating specials that are just $7. Mason Hereford, the chef and owner of Molly’s Rise and Shine in New Orleans, decided to stop cooking his menu of gonzo breakfast items and turn his efforts to lobbying for the restaurant industry instead. And chef Lincoln Carson—the chef responsible for some of the best pastries I’ve ever had—tried to save his restaurant Bon Temps by serving family-style takeout meals but eventually had to make the decision to permanently call it quits. 

So this year, with this Best New Restaurants list, we honor their hard work, their dedication to their communities, and the reality that they may not all survive. 


Food & Wine Best New Restaurants 2020

I spent the first half of the month of February on my final leg of nearly five months of travel and research for this year’s Best New Restaurants list. As I bopped in and out of restaurants in the Pacific Northwest, my biggest concerns were avoiding traffic and making my reservations on time. COVID-19 was just a blip on the radar, a scary virus that was oceans away. Little could I imagine that just a few weeks later, life as we knew it would come to a screeching halt, and restaurants as we knew them would cease to exist those bustling dining rooms I was so eager to visit would soon turn eerily𠅊nd, in some cases, permanently—silent.

To be perfectly frank, my Food & Wine colleagues and I have spent the months since I wrapped my research debating the merits of list-making as a pandemic rages on throughout the world and people take to the streets to push back against police brutality and systemic racism. Restaurants—whether they are fine dining or casual, big or small𠅊re fighting tooth and nail to survive. Do we really need a list of the country’s best new restaurants, or chefs, right now at this moment in our country’s history? 

I say yes. A pandemic doesn’t cancel the work that these remarkable chefs and restaurant owners have done over the past year. Maybe these sorts of declarations are cliché at this point, but it was truly an incredible year for dining in America. Diners were spoiled for options, most at incredibly affordable price points. I still think about the cozy Burmese dinner I ate at Washington, D.C.’s Thamee𠅊 parade of hits, including a deeply satisfying, slightly tannic tea leaf salad. I still dream of the showstopping tom yum soup, overflowing with aromatics and giant prawns, that I scarfed down at Kalaya in Philadelphia. I would pay a very large sum of money to once again spend an afternoon tearing through a plate of duck confit tacos at Nixta Taqueria in Austin. 

It was deeply important to me, in my first year as a restaurant editor, to expand the definition of what gets to count as a �st new restaurant.” The idea that a restaurant had to be a place with four walls, a front door, and daily hours felt limiting. It also didn’t feel equitable. Not everyone can afford to open a brick-and-mortar spot. Not everyone wants to. But to ignore the creativity and sheer flavor that comes out of food stands, pop-ups, and trucks felt like a giant missed opportunity. As long as a concept was regularly accessible by diners, it was fair game. 

Food & Wine is partnering with Southern Smoke Foundation to help raise money for restaurant workers around the country who are in crisis. Please consider making a donation today.

That decision paid off in droves, surfacing gems like El Ruso, a taco truck in Los Angeles that serves flour tortillas so tender they will make you weep and offers the kind of hospitality that is so rooted in generosity, you can’t teach it. It also brought me to food halls, namely one in Chicago, where a stand called Thattu was serving up some of the most exciting, and comforting, Indian food in the country. 

The more I thought about it, the more imperative it felt to publish this list this year. The restaurant industry is a notoriously difficult business in the best of circumstances, with many restaurants shuttering just a couple years after opening. So for these 10 restaurants to open their doors and face an industry-shifting pandemic head-on in their first year of business is an uphill battle to say the least. In a restaurant’s first year, the team is just finding their rhythm. They are just starting to develop regulars, but they don’t have the same loyal customer base a restaurant that has been open for a decade might have. In the first year, many owners are still paying off the debts they incurred to open their restaurant in the first place. 

Still, in the midst of everything, these restaurants quickly pivoted, finding different ways to support and feed their communities. For example, chef Sam Yoo and his team quickly changed the menu of Asian-influenced diner hits at Golden Diner to be not only delivery friendly but also extremely affordable, creating specials that are just $7. Mason Hereford, the chef and owner of Molly’s Rise and Shine in New Orleans, decided to stop cooking his menu of gonzo breakfast items and turn his efforts to lobbying for the restaurant industry instead. And chef Lincoln Carson—the chef responsible for some of the best pastries I’ve ever had—tried to save his restaurant Bon Temps by serving family-style takeout meals but eventually had to make the decision to permanently call it quits. 

So this year, with this Best New Restaurants list, we honor their hard work, their dedication to their communities, and the reality that they may not all survive. 


Food & Wine Best New Restaurants 2020

I spent the first half of the month of February on my final leg of nearly five months of travel and research for this year’s Best New Restaurants list. As I bopped in and out of restaurants in the Pacific Northwest, my biggest concerns were avoiding traffic and making my reservations on time. COVID-19 was just a blip on the radar, a scary virus that was oceans away. Little could I imagine that just a few weeks later, life as we knew it would come to a screeching halt, and restaurants as we knew them would cease to exist those bustling dining rooms I was so eager to visit would soon turn eerily𠅊nd, in some cases, permanently—silent.

To be perfectly frank, my Food & Wine colleagues and I have spent the months since I wrapped my research debating the merits of list-making as a pandemic rages on throughout the world and people take to the streets to push back against police brutality and systemic racism. Restaurants—whether they are fine dining or casual, big or small𠅊re fighting tooth and nail to survive. Do we really need a list of the country’s best new restaurants, or chefs, right now at this moment in our country’s history? 

I say yes. A pandemic doesn’t cancel the work that these remarkable chefs and restaurant owners have done over the past year. Maybe these sorts of declarations are cliché at this point, but it was truly an incredible year for dining in America. Diners were spoiled for options, most at incredibly affordable price points. I still think about the cozy Burmese dinner I ate at Washington, D.C.’s Thamee𠅊 parade of hits, including a deeply satisfying, slightly tannic tea leaf salad. I still dream of the showstopping tom yum soup, overflowing with aromatics and giant prawns, that I scarfed down at Kalaya in Philadelphia. I would pay a very large sum of money to once again spend an afternoon tearing through a plate of duck confit tacos at Nixta Taqueria in Austin. 

It was deeply important to me, in my first year as a restaurant editor, to expand the definition of what gets to count as a �st new restaurant.” The idea that a restaurant had to be a place with four walls, a front door, and daily hours felt limiting. It also didn’t feel equitable. Not everyone can afford to open a brick-and-mortar spot. Not everyone wants to. But to ignore the creativity and sheer flavor that comes out of food stands, pop-ups, and trucks felt like a giant missed opportunity. As long as a concept was regularly accessible by diners, it was fair game. 

Food & Wine is partnering with Southern Smoke Foundation to help raise money for restaurant workers around the country who are in crisis. Please consider making a donation today.

That decision paid off in droves, surfacing gems like El Ruso, a taco truck in Los Angeles that serves flour tortillas so tender they will make you weep and offers the kind of hospitality that is so rooted in generosity, you can’t teach it. It also brought me to food halls, namely one in Chicago, where a stand called Thattu was serving up some of the most exciting, and comforting, Indian food in the country. 

The more I thought about it, the more imperative it felt to publish this list this year. The restaurant industry is a notoriously difficult business in the best of circumstances, with many restaurants shuttering just a couple years after opening. So for these 10 restaurants to open their doors and face an industry-shifting pandemic head-on in their first year of business is an uphill battle to say the least. In a restaurant’s first year, the team is just finding their rhythm. They are just starting to develop regulars, but they don’t have the same loyal customer base a restaurant that has been open for a decade might have. In the first year, many owners are still paying off the debts they incurred to open their restaurant in the first place. 

Still, in the midst of everything, these restaurants quickly pivoted, finding different ways to support and feed their communities. For example, chef Sam Yoo and his team quickly changed the menu of Asian-influenced diner hits at Golden Diner to be not only delivery friendly but also extremely affordable, creating specials that are just $7. Mason Hereford, the chef and owner of Molly’s Rise and Shine in New Orleans, decided to stop cooking his menu of gonzo breakfast items and turn his efforts to lobbying for the restaurant industry instead. And chef Lincoln Carson—the chef responsible for some of the best pastries I’ve ever had—tried to save his restaurant Bon Temps by serving family-style takeout meals but eventually had to make the decision to permanently call it quits. 

So this year, with this Best New Restaurants list, we honor their hard work, their dedication to their communities, and the reality that they may not all survive. 


Food & Wine Best New Restaurants 2020

I spent the first half of the month of February on my final leg of nearly five months of travel and research for this year’s Best New Restaurants list. As I bopped in and out of restaurants in the Pacific Northwest, my biggest concerns were avoiding traffic and making my reservations on time. COVID-19 was just a blip on the radar, a scary virus that was oceans away. Little could I imagine that just a few weeks later, life as we knew it would come to a screeching halt, and restaurants as we knew them would cease to exist those bustling dining rooms I was so eager to visit would soon turn eerily𠅊nd, in some cases, permanently—silent.

To be perfectly frank, my Food & Wine colleagues and I have spent the months since I wrapped my research debating the merits of list-making as a pandemic rages on throughout the world and people take to the streets to push back against police brutality and systemic racism. Restaurants—whether they are fine dining or casual, big or small𠅊re fighting tooth and nail to survive. Do we really need a list of the country’s best new restaurants, or chefs, right now at this moment in our country’s history? 

I say yes. A pandemic doesn’t cancel the work that these remarkable chefs and restaurant owners have done over the past year. Maybe these sorts of declarations are cliché at this point, but it was truly an incredible year for dining in America. Diners were spoiled for options, most at incredibly affordable price points. I still think about the cozy Burmese dinner I ate at Washington, D.C.’s Thamee𠅊 parade of hits, including a deeply satisfying, slightly tannic tea leaf salad. I still dream of the showstopping tom yum soup, overflowing with aromatics and giant prawns, that I scarfed down at Kalaya in Philadelphia. I would pay a very large sum of money to once again spend an afternoon tearing through a plate of duck confit tacos at Nixta Taqueria in Austin. 

It was deeply important to me, in my first year as a restaurant editor, to expand the definition of what gets to count as a �st new restaurant.” The idea that a restaurant had to be a place with four walls, a front door, and daily hours felt limiting. It also didn’t feel equitable. Not everyone can afford to open a brick-and-mortar spot. Not everyone wants to. But to ignore the creativity and sheer flavor that comes out of food stands, pop-ups, and trucks felt like a giant missed opportunity. As long as a concept was regularly accessible by diners, it was fair game. 

Food & Wine is partnering with Southern Smoke Foundation to help raise money for restaurant workers around the country who are in crisis. Please consider making a donation today.

That decision paid off in droves, surfacing gems like El Ruso, a taco truck in Los Angeles that serves flour tortillas so tender they will make you weep and offers the kind of hospitality that is so rooted in generosity, you can’t teach it. It also brought me to food halls, namely one in Chicago, where a stand called Thattu was serving up some of the most exciting, and comforting, Indian food in the country. 

The more I thought about it, the more imperative it felt to publish this list this year. The restaurant industry is a notoriously difficult business in the best of circumstances, with many restaurants shuttering just a couple years after opening. So for these 10 restaurants to open their doors and face an industry-shifting pandemic head-on in their first year of business is an uphill battle to say the least. In a restaurant’s first year, the team is just finding their rhythm. They are just starting to develop regulars, but they don’t have the same loyal customer base a restaurant that has been open for a decade might have. In the first year, many owners are still paying off the debts they incurred to open their restaurant in the first place. 

Still, in the midst of everything, these restaurants quickly pivoted, finding different ways to support and feed their communities. For example, chef Sam Yoo and his team quickly changed the menu of Asian-influenced diner hits at Golden Diner to be not only delivery friendly but also extremely affordable, creating specials that are just $7. Mason Hereford, the chef and owner of Molly’s Rise and Shine in New Orleans, decided to stop cooking his menu of gonzo breakfast items and turn his efforts to lobbying for the restaurant industry instead. And chef Lincoln Carson—the chef responsible for some of the best pastries I’ve ever had—tried to save his restaurant Bon Temps by serving family-style takeout meals but eventually had to make the decision to permanently call it quits. 

So this year, with this Best New Restaurants list, we honor their hard work, their dedication to their communities, and the reality that they may not all survive. 


Watch the video: Έλληνες εστιάτορες στις ΗΠΑ. Η ΚΑΘΗΜΕΡΙΝΗ