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The Serrated Knife

The Serrated Knife


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Ideal for foods hard on the outside, chewy on the inside.

Serrated knives, with their scalloped, toothlike edge, are ideal for cutting through foods with a hard exterior and softer interior, such as a loaf of crusty bread. The principle behind a serrated knife is similar to that of a saw: The teeth of the blade catch and then rip as the knife smoothly slides through the food. It cuts cleanly through the resistant skin and juicy flesh of a ripe tomato without crushing it. Crusty bread is easier and neater to cut using a serrated knife because the crust will splinter less.

Three More Tasks for a Serrated Knife

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Slice whole citrus fruits: Because citrus skin is tough and slick, the serrated blade is best for this task.

Cut baked phyllo dough: The blade gently saws through the delicate pastry so it crumbles less.

Slice a layer cake: A serrated knife is thinner and more delicate than a chef's knife and cuts cleanly through tender, moist cakes.

Owner's Manual
Cleaning: While many manufacturers claim their knives can go in the dishwasher, you should always wash knives by hand. Washing in the dishwasher can dull the blade. Use a soft sponge and warm, soapy water to maximize the life and performance of your knife. And avoid soaking knives in water; prolonged immersion can loosen the handles.

Storing: Keep your knives in a knife block, on a magnetic strip designed to hold knives that's mounted somewhere safe, or in a special drawer insert that has slots for the blades. Never store them loose in a drawer―the free movement could result in nicked or dulled blades, as well as nicked hands when you reach in to pull them out.


Why a Serrated Knife Is the Best Tool to Slice Tomatoes

While those big knife blocks seem to send the message that every kitchen needs a dozen knives, it’s really not true. Invest in a good chef’s knife and small paring knife and those can take care of almost all of your slicing and dicing needs.

There is one more knife, however, that is essential for cutting bread and tomatoes: the serrated knife.

While you can cut tomatoes with a chef’s knife (in fact, knife sharpeners sometimes use tomatoes as a test), your blade has to be ultra-sharp to do a good job. Because tomatoes have thin skins but soft, delicate flesh underneath, anything less than sharp won’t get through the skin easily. You probably also have to apply a lot of pressure, running the risk of crushing the tomato.

But a serrated knife with all the little teeth? Those teeth grab onto a tomato’s thin skin and cut straight through rather than slipping off the side or squishing the tomato with unnecessary pressure.

Once you realize how much easier it is to cut tomatoes with a serrated knife, you’ll never go back. Time to enjoy those perfect, evenly cut slices!

No Serrated Knife on Hand?

If you find yourself without serrated knife, simply “snip” the skin of the tomato with the sharp tip of our chef’s knife to get some traction before slicing all the way through.


Related Items

Best Overall: Mercer Culinary Millennia 10-inch Wavy Edge Bread Knife

Not only is this affordable bread knife by Mercer an Amazon best-seller, but the brand itself comes highly recommended by multiple chefs. It's made of a single piece of high-carbon Japanese steel, which means it "holds a sharp edge for a long time," says Eric Brownlee, executive chef at The Katharine in Winston-Salem, NC. The handle (which is available in eight different colors) is made with a combination of plastic and rubber that's easy to hold, especially thanks to the textured grips that prevent slipping. "This knife excels when it's time to delicately slice through three slices of toasted bread piled with crispy bacon, soft tomatoes, lettuce, and meats," Brownlee says. And with prices starting at just $17, the Mercer bread knife is also an incredibly great value.

Most Versatile: Victorinox Swiss Army Fibrox 10.25-inch Bread Knife

Whether you're slicing delicate pastries, rich cakes, or thick-crusted bread, the Fibrox knife from Victorinox Swiss Army can handle just about any task. "It's a very versatile knife for all breads and practical for chefs of all levels," says Dan Grunbeck, executive chef, Kimpton The Rowan Palm Springs. "It's a 'one knife does it all' for bread knives, from bagels to hearth-baked breads." Although the bread knife is dishwasher-safe, the brand still recommends washing it by hand to avoid dulling the blade. It's also worth noting that it has a curved blade (unlike many other bread knives) that makes it easier to control, according to Ed Tatton, owner of a sourdough bakery in Canada. "[It allows] you to get the perfect slice out of your loaf."

Best Edge Retention: Wüsthof Classic 10-inch Bread Knife

This 10-inch bread knife from Wüsthof, a.k.a. Ina Garten's go-to knife brand, is designed to slice through bread without crushing the inside or leaving too many crumbs behind. The German-made knife uses the brand's proprietary Precision Edge Technology, which uses lasers to make the blade 20% sharper than previous versions with twice the edge retention. "Not only [is the knife] useful for slicing crusty bread, I also use it nearly every day to slice cakes as well," says Wilk. "I always have a special place in my heart for Wüsthof, as it was the first knife that was purchased for me as a gift when I went to culinary school."

Most Flexible Blade: Tojiro 9.25-inch Bread Slicer

Kelly Mencin, pastry chef at Rolo's in New York City, loves the Tojiro bread slicer so much that it's the knife she uses at home. She says it's "a little more flexible and thinner" than the one she uses at the restaurant, which makes it ideal for softer types of bread. Made with a high-carbon stainless steel blade and a natural wood handle, the Tojiro knife will last a while as long as it's properly taken care of. "This bread knife is extremely sharp while still being lightweight," says April Franqueza, pastry chef at High Hampton in Cashiers, NC. "I also love it because regardless of where you're at in your bread adventure, whether an amateur or professional, it is affordable and accessible." Amazon shoppers clearly love it too: The bread knife has more than a thousand five-star ratings, with one reviewer saying it "slices artisan sourdough bread in thin slices like nothing else [they've] ever tried."

Best DTC: Made In 9-inch Bread Knife

In addition to its cookware, direct-to-consumer brand Made In also makes a great serrated bread knife. The knife was created in partnership with chef Nancy Silverton, but it's also earned praise from others in the food industry. "[It's] super sharp and holds an edge very well," says Matthew Raiford, professional chef and author of the cookbook Bress 'n' Nyam: Gullah Geechee Recipes from a Sixth-Generation Farmer. The bread knife is made of forged stainless steel, and its 9-inch blade has 24 serrated points that cut through every type of bread. According to Raiford, the Made In bread knife is the "right type of [knife] to not only cut a sweet cream biscuit or slice up some beer bread and baguettes with ease, but also great for cutting into a soft tomato or mango very cleanly."

Best Offset: Shun Classic Offset 8.25-inch Bread Knife

An offset bread knife, like this one from Shun, has a slightly different design than the other knives on this list. The blade is slightly lower than the handle, which keeps "knuckles clear of the cutting board," says chef Suzanne Lane of Aster Hall in Chicago. She also appreciates that the bread knife is lightweight (thanks to its sharp Japanese steel). Even though Shun was one of the most common brands recommended by the chefs we spoke to, you don't have to be at their level to use it. "It's a professional knife brand that is also perfect for the home cook," says Maya-Camille Broussard, owner of the bakery Justice of the Pies, and someone who is "sentimentally attached" to the brand. "When I first started to seriously work in the kitchen, my cousin, Justin, gifted me my first Shun knife as a 'thank you' for flying to San Francisco to babysit his kids for a week," she says.

Best with Ergonomic Handle: Global Ukon 9-inch Bread Knife

The Global Ukon bread knife, which is exclusive to Williams Sonoma, boasts an ergonomic handle with a rounded spine that's comfortable enough to hold for long periods of time. The handle itself is give inches long and has an ambidextrous thumb rest, so it works just as well for left-handed and right-handed people. "We go through a lot of crostini in the restaurants, whether it's for beef tartare, salmon rillette, or as a vehicle to soak up brown butter," says Ashish Alfred, chef and owner of the Alfred Restaurant Group, who has been using this brand since culinary school. "That's a lot of thin slices of bread, which can be miserable on your wrist pretty quickly. But this global knife has a thin handle and plenty of room for your index finger, taking a lot of the pressure off," says Alfred.


Best Multipurpose: Victorinox Swiss Army 10.25-Inch Bread Knife

Versatility is one of the key qualities of a good kitchen tool, and the Victorinox totally delivers on this aspect. The thin blade, the curved edge, and the sharp tines can handle anything you throw them. Although it is categorized as a bread knife, it makes quick work of other kitchen jobs, such as slicing meat, cutting razor-thin tomato slices, and dividing a sandwich that’s bursting at its seams (no judgment on the sandwich).

The length and thinness of the blade also make it a good pastry knife. From the same company that makes Swiss Army knives comes this serrated bread knife with a proprietary Fibrox-material handle to provide a secure, nonslip grip and easy handling. This knife cuts clean without cutting a deep hole in your pocket.


I'm Obsessed With My Serrated Paring Knife

I have two little red serrated paring knives from Wüsthof in my life: one lives on my magnetic knife strip at home, and one is hidden in the drawer of my work station here in the Test Kitchen. I hide it because if someone else borrows it and I don't know where it is, I get very cranky. This is a knife I always want to have within reach.

What's so great about this little $9 knife? It's the best tool for thinly slicing rounds of citrus, and it's perfect for slicing tomatoes of any size. Ever tried cutting delicate slices of lemon with a regular paring knife, or slicing grape tomatoes in half with a bread knife? The sawing motion of the serrated knife makes it easier to slice through the tough skin and delicate flesh of citrus fruit without squishing or deforming it. And using a large bread knife to cut small ingredients (especially round ones, like tiny tomatoes) is a recipe for successfully slicing your fingertips off. (A good chef's knife can be used for both tasks, of course, but only if it's super-sharp, which is often not the case.)

Making candied citrus is easier with a serrated paring knife to help you thinly and evenly slice it.

The next time you're making tomato salad, use a serrated paring knife instead of your dull chef's knife, and the job will be so much easier. Need super-thin, gorgeous orange slices for an upside-down cake? Your small serrated knife is the right tool for the job. And speaking of cake, a serrated paring knife is perfect for trimming cake edges (or slicing off a bit to nibble on). It's also my favorite tool for evenly slicing chilled dough for any kind of slice-and-bake cookies.

You can buy a fancy mini serrated knife, but it's not going to perform any better than my $9 one, so don't bother. But if your regular paring knife needs to be replaced (and it probably does), you can also buy a set that also includes a serrated paring knife, like this one from Kuhn Rikon for $18 or this adorable ombre collection from Opinel for $25. Or get a whole set of serrated paring knives to use as steak knives at the dinner table as well as for prep work. Once you start using them, you'll want to have one stashed away in every drawer too.


3. Can serrated knives be sharpened?

It is fully possible that after a long time you start to notice your serrated knife isn’t performing quite as smoothly as it used to. If you slice through a piece of bread and start to notice crumbs on your counter when it used to go clean through, this is a sign that your serrated knife might be in need of some maintenance with a sharpening tool.

As we mentioned before, there seems to be a strangely pervasive idea within culinary communities that it’s not worth splurging on a high-quality serrated knife, and that buying an inexpensive one is good enough. The idea being that when the cheap blade is no longer at peak performance, you’ll dispose of the dull knife and replace it with a new one.

Of course, we recommend against this it’s a short-sighted perspective, and continuously buying inexpensive knives is going to very quickly surpass the cost of one high-quality product. Sharpening isn’t such a scary thing that you need to resort to this!

If you buy a quality serrated knife made of high-carbon steel, you’ll have a durable knife with fantastic edge retention that will take years before it needs to be sharpened.

So can serrated knives be sharpened? Absolutely! Knife sharpening doesn’t have to be a scary proposition. All you need is a sharpener, which could be a ceramic sharpening rod (the preferred method), or some easy to find household items (the DIY method). You’ll see what we mean in just a moment.


Other Knives We Tested

A few other knives we tested include the Knifey 8” Serrated Knife, the Messermeister Park Plaza Serrated Knife, and the Miyabi Kaizen 9.5” Bread Knife. The Messermeister was the first knife we tested, but it couldn’t cut through the surface of the extra-crusty loaf. At $55, it's an affordable option, but only if you expect to slice softer subjects (i.e. not extra-crusty bread). The Knifey is the most saw-like of the bunch, which, if that’s your thing, great. The blade isn't quite long enough to pinch, but the handle is ergonomic and comfortable to grip. We ultimately found the teeth to be too sharp after they ripped through the flesh of the tomatoes. To cut through the loaf with the Miyabi Kaizen, small-but-mighty Emily had to lean all the way into it and ended up with an oversized, crushed, nearly broken slice of bread, to which Joe remarked, “If it’s going to cut like that straight out of the box, it’s not going to last.” Food is not meant to be hacked and mangled, and you should have total control of your knife as you cut. These things were not the case with the Miyabi. That said, it did eventually make its way through the bread, which is something.

We also tested the Bob Kramer Essential Bread Knife by Zwilling—it cut through bread with a little less resistance than the Shun but struggled to get through the bottom. However, it cut through tomatoes like butter, slicing perfectly thin and even slices. It was easy to control, contoured to our hands nicely, and had a nice heft. At $200, it's not exactly the cheapest knife on the block, but if you place a high value on cutting tomatoes, the price is worth it.


i have a confession to make. up until recently, i used a serrated steak knife for all things culinary chopping, cutting, butterflying, julienne-ing, etc. you name it. if i was cutting it in the kitchen, it was with a serrated steak knife. they were small enough for me to handle comfortably and stayed [sort of] sharp. cutting a large piece of meat or a melon proved to be a little sketchy, but i still have all ten fingers, so i was doing a-ok. large knives always seemed unwieldy and overzealous, or somehow pretentious. as if using a large butcher knife would make me a snarky, asshole hipster or something. additionally, i’m pretty sure that any oversized knife i had was remorsefully and embarrassingly dull which made it even more dangerous, but truth be told, i doubt i knew the difference.

anyone who knows me knows that i’m a control freak, and i think that’s part of my discomfort with large sharp things. i never felt like i had control over a large knife. i am a painter by nature, and having control or something smaller, more gentle and far less sharp like a paintbrush is a little more in my comfort zone. large butcher knives can be nearly as long as my forearm and my overactive imagination envisions slicing off my whole hand in similar fashion to a bad zombie movie.

i’ve known for quite some time that if i was ever going to make cooking a real, honest hobby that i needed to graduate from the serrated steak knife, but i wasn’t having anything to do with the ridiculous cleavers i’ve seen on television or in stores. early last year when my boyfriend and i moved in together, he came with not only a great set of glass storage containers and two cats, but also this perfectly sized knife that seemed like it was made for me.

it’s probably no more than 5 or 6 inches, which is a perfect size and less intimidating, plus it was actually sharp. and i mean sharp. my hours logged in watching Food Network have taught me how to hold it correctly, so i believe i’m on the right path. as cheesy and lame as it sounds, i think it might have actually produced some additional confidence in the kitchen. maybe one of these days i’ll get some fancy knives or take some knife handling classes, but for now, i’m proud of my graduation from serrated steak knife to a real, legit knife that actually requires sharpening every now and again.


The Serrated Knife - Recipes

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Excellent. Larger than I thought, but perfect.

Very good product. Helps reduce ce squishing of fruit and gives better slices

PepperMate's Brief History of Pepper Mills Pepper mills, sometimes referred to as pepper grinders, are a common kitchen accessory designed to grind peppercorns into a fine powder used to season foods. Many of us probably have a pepper mill sitting in our kitchen right now! Yes, that's very true. History of the Pepper Mill The pepper grinder was invented by Peugeot of France in 1842. Earlier versions of pepper mills were based on a mortar and pestle design. The pepper grinder allowed for a less labor intensive way to crack the peppercorns. The pepper grinder invented by Peugeot was constructed of metal and the individual grooves inside the casing were virtually indestructible. You may really want to see it. Pepper Mill Construction Peppermills can be made from a variety of different materials including steel, zinc alloy, ceramic or even acrylic. Stainless steel models are durable and crack resistant making it an excellent choice for a device that requires a fair amount of continuous pressure. Stainless steel in the number one choice for professional chefs and home chefs alike. Zinc alloy is also a popular choice because of its ability to resist corrosion. Zinc alloy is a composite material made up of a mixture of chrome plating, zinc and assorted metals. Ceramic peppermills are popular because a chef can use them to grind multiple things. Salt, pepper and even coffee can be ground in a ceramic model. Another popular choice is acrylic. It is durable and cost effective. While not as aesthetically pleasing as stainless steel or even ceramic, it get the job done! See some our World Famous Pepper Grinders. Electric Peppermills Peppermills can also be electronic. An electric motor powered by battery or from an electricity source, grinds the peppercorn completely eliminating the need for manual operation. Electric grinders grind peppercorns much faster than manual models. A drawback to the electric model is that some heat is generated by the high amount of friction which can affect the taste and performance of the peppercorns. Benefits of Freshly Ground Pepper versus store bought pepper Pepper is almost always better when it is freshly ground. As soon as peppercorns are ground up they begin to lose some of their flavor and intensity. Within a period of about three months, pepper shows a marked difference in quality. Something to consider is that while pepper you buy from a store may have been placed on the shelf within the last week, the chances are that the peppercorns used in the manufacturing process were harvested many months before they were actually ground and packaged. This fact added to the time it takes to process the peppercorns means that the pepper you sprinkle into that pot of chili has been slowly degraded over a period of months. Professional chefs will almost always choose freshly ground pepper over any sort of pre-ground pepper. Measuring Freshly Ground Pepper When you look at a recipe in a book you will often see that many common recipes call for freshly ground black pepper. Unfortunately they do not always specify the exact amount. You may be told to simply “sprinkle” some freshly ground pepper or even “generously season” a piece of meat with pepper. What exactly does that mean? Most home cooks would agree that when it comes to pepper, they are not pulling out a measuring cup or measuring spoons to determine the amount of pepper to use in a recipe. Using salt and pepper in a recipe is one of those things that most people just kind of leave up to chance. But you may be depriving yourself and the folks you are feeding by not putting enough seasoning into your dishes, or on the other hand, adding too much. Measurements like “sprinkle” don’t exactly help! The taste test doesn’t always work either. If you are cooking with raw eggs or meat, it’s not a good idea to taste your recipe before it I fully cooked. A really easy way to measure the amount of ground pepper in a recipe is to count the number of rotations used. Try grinding out one or two rotations into to a bowl and measuring the output. For example, if five turns of the grinder equals one teaspoon, you will know that’s the amount you are adding. You can, in turn, experiment with your recipes so that you know exactly how spicy your casserole should be and then add the pepper accordingly. Types of Peppercorns Pepper is served at nearly every table on the planet. It may surprise you to know, however, that there are a wide variety of peppers out there, each one with own distinctive flavor. Black Peppercorns - are the most recognizable. They are actually a dried berry and happen to be the most flavorful and aromatic. The berries are harvested just before they are ripe and are traditionally laid in the sun to dry out. When the dried hull is cracked the flavor released is strong which is why chefs prefer this pepper above most others. Tellicherry peppers - are another popular type of peppercorn. It is the oldest known source for what we call “black pepper.” Its name comes from the region it is harvested in, India, and it has a complex flavor. It is darker than most other peppercorns and was actually used as form of currency in ancient times! Green peppercorns - are another popular option for chefs ad home cooks alike. Green peppercorn berries are picked well before they are ripe and then the berry is freeze-dried in most cases. The texture of these peppercorns is smooth and the taste is much milder than black peppercorns. Green peppercorns have a tart flavor that disappears quickly after the hull is cracked. Green pepper is best served freshly ground to preserve the flavor. White pepper - is not as well known in the United States as it is in Europe. While pepper is derived from fully matured berries and the hull is removed. The remaining berry is sun dried and as it is dried it becomes the distinctive pale color. White pepper is sold as either whole or ground and is one of the main ingredients in fish sauces and creamy soups. PepperMate's Brief History of Pepper Mills Pepper mills, sometimes referred to as pepper grinders, are a common kitchen accessory designed to grind peppercorns into a fine powder used to season foods. Many of us probably have a pepper mill sitting in our kitchen right now! Yes, that's very true. History of the Pepper Mill The pepper grinder was invented by Peugeot of France in 1842. Earlier versions of pepper mills were based on a mortar and pestle design. The pepper grinder allowed for a less labor intensive way to crack the peppercorns. The pepper grinder invented by Peugeot was constructed of metal and the individual grooves inside the casing were virtually indestructible. You may really want to see it. Pepper Mill Construction Peppermills can be made from a variety of different materials including steel, zinc alloy, ceramic or even acrylic. Stainless steel models are durable and crack resistant making it an excellent choice for a device that requires a fair amount of continuous pressure. Stainless steel in the number one choice for professional chefs and home chefs alike. Zinc alloy is also a popular choice because of its ability to resist corrosion. Zinc alloy is a composite material made up of a mixture of chrome plating, zinc and assorted metals. Ceramic peppermills are popular because a chef can use them to grind multiple things. Salt, pepper and even coffee can be ground in a ceramic model. Another popular choice is acrylic. It is durable and cost effective. While not as aesthetically pleasing as stainless steel or even ceramic, it get the job done! See some our World Famous Pepper Grinders. Electric Peppermills Peppermills can also be electronic. An electric motor powered by battery or from an electricity source, grinds the peppercorn completely eliminating the need for manual operation. Electric grinders grind peppercorns much faster than manual models. A drawback to the electric model is that some heat is generated by the high amount of friction which can affect the taste and performance of the peppercorns. Benefits of Freshly Ground Pepper versus store bought pepper Pepper is almost always better when it is freshly ground. As soon as peppercorns are ground up they begin to lose some of their flavor and intensity. Within a period of about three months, pepper shows a marked difference in quality. Something to consider is that while pepper you buy from a store may have been placed on the shelf within the last week, the chances are that the peppercorns used in the manufacturing process were harvested many months before they were actually ground and packaged. This fact added to the time it takes to process the peppercorns means that the pepper you sprinkle into that pot of chili has been slowly degraded over a period of months. Professional chefs will almost always choose freshly ground pepper over any sort of pre-ground pepper. Measuring Freshly Ground Pepper When you look at a recipe in a book you will often see that many common recipes call for freshly ground black pepper. Unfortunately they do not always specify the exact amount. You may be told to simply “sprinkle” some freshly ground pepper or even “generously season” a piece of meat with pepper. What exactly does that mean? Most home cooks would agree that when it comes to pepper, they are not pulling out a measuring cup or measuring spoons to determine the amount of pepper to use in a recipe. Using salt and pepper in a recipe is one of those things that most people just kind of leave up to chance. But you may be depriving yourself and the folks you are feeding by not putting enough seasoning into your dishes, or on the other hand, adding too much. Measurements like “sprinkle” don’t exactly help! The taste test doesn’t always work either. If you are cooking with raw eggs or meat, it’s not a good idea to taste your recipe before it I fully cooked. A really easy way to measure the amount of ground pepper in a recipe is to count the number of rotations used. Try grinding out one or two rotations into to a bowl and measuring the output. For example, if five turns of the grinder equals one teaspoon, you will know that’s the amount you are adding. You can, in turn, experiment with your recipes so that you know exactly how spicy your casserole should be and then add the pepper accordingly. Types of Peppercorns Pepper is served at nearly every table on the planet. It may surprise you to know, however, that there are a wide variety of peppers out there, each one with own distinctive flavor. Black Peppercorns - are the most recognizable. They are actually a dried berry and happen to be the most flavorful and aromatic. The berries are harvested just before they are ripe and are traditionally laid in the sun to dry out. When the dried hull is cracked the flavor released is strong which is why chefs prefer this pepper above most others. Tellicherry peppers - are another popular type of peppercorn. It is the oldest known source for what we call “black pepper.” Its name comes from the region it is harvested in, India, and it has a complex flavor. It is darker than most other peppercorns and was actually used as form of currency in ancient times! Green peppercorns - are another popular option for chefs ad home cooks alike. Green peppercorn berries are picked well before they are ripe and then the berry is freeze-dried in most cases. The texture of these peppercorns is smooth and the taste is much milder than black peppercorns. Green peppercorns have a tart flavor that disappears quickly after the hull is cracked. Green pepper is best served freshly ground to preserve the flavor. White pepper - is not as well known in the United States as it is in Europe. While pepper is derived from fully matured berries and the hull is removed. The remaining berry is sun dried and as it is dried it becomes the distinctive pale color. White pepper is sold as either whole or ground and is one of the main ingredients in fish sauces and creamy soups.

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The Serrated Steak Knife is a popular choice. The 7¾" overall length of this knife is perfect when you’re digging into that juicy piece of meat!

The sharp surgical-quality, T420 high-carbon stainless steel blade effortlessly cuts through steaks, chops, lamb, poultry, and more. You can be sure this knife’s saw-like edge will get the job done.

No kitchen is complete without Rada’s Serrated Steak Knife sold individually and in sets. You’ll find yourself reaching for it again and again.

Available in two handle finishes—solid brushed aluminum and black stainless steel resin.

Our Serrated Steak Knife is also available in our Four Serrated Steak Knives Gift Set and Six Serrated Steak Knives Gift Set.

See what others love about Rada’s Serrated Steak Knife.

Blade Length: 3⁷/8"

Total Length: 7¾"

Blade Material: Surgical-Quality, T420 High-Carbon Stainless Steel

Black Handle Material: Molded Resin

Silver Handle Material: Cast Aluminum

Country of Production: USA

Product Warranty: The Lifetime Guarantee

Hand washing all fine cutlery is recommended.

Hand washing Rada’s silver-handle knives and utensils is recommended. This prevents microscopic dings on the blades’ cutting edge, eliminates the harsh environment created by a dishwasher's high temperatures and abrasive detergents, and helps protect your cutlery from corrosion, ultimately extending the life of the finish. While Rada’s black-handle knives are more tolerant to the dishwasher, Rada recommends hand washing all fine cutlery.


Watch the video: GTA IV Broadcast: On CNT: The Serrated Edge