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Trans Fat Ban Helps New Yorkers Slim Down and More News

Trans Fat Ban Helps New Yorkers Slim Down and More News


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In today's Media Mix, hypoallergenic wine made, plus possible third restaurant for Gordon Ramsey

Arthur Bovino

The Daily Meal's Media Mix brings you the biggest news around the food world.

The NYC Trans Fat Ban Worked: After Bloomberg required fast-food restaurants to stop using trans fats, new evidence shows that fast food did become a little bit healthier. [Huffington Post]

New Restaurant for Gordon Ramsey: Rumor has it he's considering a third restaurant in Caesar's in Las Vegas. [Eater]

Yeast Developed for Hypoallergenic Wine: The yeast may help prevent "red wine headaches." [New York Daily News]

Carmela 'Mama' Sbarro Dies: Sbarro, who passed away at age 90, helped found the eponymous pizza joint. [Nation's Restaurant News]

Portland Approves Food Trucks: After much debate, the Portland, Maine City Council has passed food truck regulations with specific zoning. [Portland Daily Sun]


A Bloomberg presidential bid would reignite feisty public health debate

F ormer New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is contemplating a presidential bid that could shake up the political landscape — and kick start a rowdy national conversation on how far government should go to protect public health.

Bloomberg has focused in recent years on pressing for gun control and aggressive moves to tackle climate change. He frames both issues as public health imperatives.

But during his three terms as mayor, ending in 2013, Bloomberg also pushed a series of bold and bitterly contested policies aimed at prodding New York City residents to adopt healthier lifestyles. He wouldn’t let them smoke in most bars or buy potatoes fried in trans fats. He even tried to ban big sodas.


A Bloomberg presidential bid would reignite feisty public health debate

F ormer New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is contemplating a presidential bid that could shake up the political landscape — and kick start a rowdy national conversation on how far government should go to protect public health.

Bloomberg has focused in recent years on pressing for gun control and aggressive moves to tackle climate change. He frames both issues as public health imperatives.

But during his three terms as mayor, ending in 2013, Bloomberg also pushed a series of bold and bitterly contested policies aimed at prodding New York City residents to adopt healthier lifestyles. He wouldn’t let them smoke in most bars or buy potatoes fried in trans fats. He even tried to ban big sodas.


A Bloomberg presidential bid would reignite feisty public health debate

F ormer New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is contemplating a presidential bid that could shake up the political landscape — and kick start a rowdy national conversation on how far government should go to protect public health.

Bloomberg has focused in recent years on pressing for gun control and aggressive moves to tackle climate change. He frames both issues as public health imperatives.

But during his three terms as mayor, ending in 2013, Bloomberg also pushed a series of bold and bitterly contested policies aimed at prodding New York City residents to adopt healthier lifestyles. He wouldn’t let them smoke in most bars or buy potatoes fried in trans fats. He even tried to ban big sodas.


A Bloomberg presidential bid would reignite feisty public health debate

F ormer New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is contemplating a presidential bid that could shake up the political landscape — and kick start a rowdy national conversation on how far government should go to protect public health.

Bloomberg has focused in recent years on pressing for gun control and aggressive moves to tackle climate change. He frames both issues as public health imperatives.

But during his three terms as mayor, ending in 2013, Bloomberg also pushed a series of bold and bitterly contested policies aimed at prodding New York City residents to adopt healthier lifestyles. He wouldn’t let them smoke in most bars or buy potatoes fried in trans fats. He even tried to ban big sodas.


A Bloomberg presidential bid would reignite feisty public health debate

F ormer New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is contemplating a presidential bid that could shake up the political landscape — and kick start a rowdy national conversation on how far government should go to protect public health.

Bloomberg has focused in recent years on pressing for gun control and aggressive moves to tackle climate change. He frames both issues as public health imperatives.

But during his three terms as mayor, ending in 2013, Bloomberg also pushed a series of bold and bitterly contested policies aimed at prodding New York City residents to adopt healthier lifestyles. He wouldn’t let them smoke in most bars or buy potatoes fried in trans fats. He even tried to ban big sodas.


A Bloomberg presidential bid would reignite feisty public health debate

F ormer New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is contemplating a presidential bid that could shake up the political landscape — and kick start a rowdy national conversation on how far government should go to protect public health.

Bloomberg has focused in recent years on pressing for gun control and aggressive moves to tackle climate change. He frames both issues as public health imperatives.

But during his three terms as mayor, ending in 2013, Bloomberg also pushed a series of bold and bitterly contested policies aimed at prodding New York City residents to adopt healthier lifestyles. He wouldn’t let them smoke in most bars or buy potatoes fried in trans fats. He even tried to ban big sodas.


A Bloomberg presidential bid would reignite feisty public health debate

F ormer New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is contemplating a presidential bid that could shake up the political landscape — and kick start a rowdy national conversation on how far government should go to protect public health.

Bloomberg has focused in recent years on pressing for gun control and aggressive moves to tackle climate change. He frames both issues as public health imperatives.

But during his three terms as mayor, ending in 2013, Bloomberg also pushed a series of bold and bitterly contested policies aimed at prodding New York City residents to adopt healthier lifestyles. He wouldn’t let them smoke in most bars or buy potatoes fried in trans fats. He even tried to ban big sodas.


A Bloomberg presidential bid would reignite feisty public health debate

F ormer New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is contemplating a presidential bid that could shake up the political landscape — and kick start a rowdy national conversation on how far government should go to protect public health.

Bloomberg has focused in recent years on pressing for gun control and aggressive moves to tackle climate change. He frames both issues as public health imperatives.

But during his three terms as mayor, ending in 2013, Bloomberg also pushed a series of bold and bitterly contested policies aimed at prodding New York City residents to adopt healthier lifestyles. He wouldn’t let them smoke in most bars or buy potatoes fried in trans fats. He even tried to ban big sodas.


A Bloomberg presidential bid would reignite feisty public health debate

F ormer New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is contemplating a presidential bid that could shake up the political landscape — and kick start a rowdy national conversation on how far government should go to protect public health.

Bloomberg has focused in recent years on pressing for gun control and aggressive moves to tackle climate change. He frames both issues as public health imperatives.

But during his three terms as mayor, ending in 2013, Bloomberg also pushed a series of bold and bitterly contested policies aimed at prodding New York City residents to adopt healthier lifestyles. He wouldn’t let them smoke in most bars or buy potatoes fried in trans fats. He even tried to ban big sodas.


A Bloomberg presidential bid would reignite feisty public health debate

F ormer New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is contemplating a presidential bid that could shake up the political landscape — and kick start a rowdy national conversation on how far government should go to protect public health.

Bloomberg has focused in recent years on pressing for gun control and aggressive moves to tackle climate change. He frames both issues as public health imperatives.

But during his three terms as mayor, ending in 2013, Bloomberg also pushed a series of bold and bitterly contested policies aimed at prodding New York City residents to adopt healthier lifestyles. He wouldn’t let them smoke in most bars or buy potatoes fried in trans fats. He even tried to ban big sodas.



Comments:

  1. Johnell

    the message is deleted

  2. Hyman

    It seems to me it is very good idea. Completely with you I will agree.

  3. Macfie

    It's a shame I can't speak now - I'm rushing to work. I will be set free - I will definitely give my opinion on this matter.

  4. Sevilin

    I am firmly convinced that you are wrong. Time will show.

  5. Shale

    Not to everybody.



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