au.blackmilkmag.com
New recipes

The Worst Alcoholic Drinks for a Diet

The Worst Alcoholic Drinks for a Diet


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


In moderation, alcohol is good for you. It can lower your risk of cardiovascular disease, boost the immune system, and may lower the risk of type II diabetes. But next time you’re out with friends, avoid these drinks, as they’re packed with empty calories.

Long Island Iced Tea

Photo by Hannah Lin

One of these drinks can have more calories in it than a whole meal. Since the serving size is usually 12 ounces, instead ask for half a serving mixed with diet soda.

White Russian

A 6-ounce White Russian, which has vodka, Kahlua and cream, has about 500 calories. Try using Kahlua-flavored sugar-free syrup instead.

Margarita

Photo by Jess Hayes

Margaritas are usually full of sugar and contain more than 150 calories. You’d need to walk more than 45 minutes to burn that many calories. Unless the margarita is made with fresh lime juice, avoid it.

Beer

Photo by Kathleen Lee

Beer may appear to be a healthier option, but some beers contain 200 to 300 calories per serving. Stick to Miller 64 or Budweiser Select 55 for a lower calorie option.

Piña Colada

Don’t be fooled by this drink’s light and refreshing taste. It can pack more than 600 calories. That’s more than Burger King’s Sausage, Egg and Cheese Biscuit Sandwich. Instead of using coconut cream or coconut milk, try coconut water.

Did you end up drinking too much? Try these tips.

More good stuff here:

  • 12 ways to eat cookie butter
  • Ultimate Chipotle menu hacks
  • Copycat Chick-Fil-A sandwich recipe
  • The easiest 2 ingredient drink recipes, ever
  • 24 must-visit Chicago restaurants from Diners, Drive-ins and Dives

View the original post, The Worst Alcoholic Drinks for a Diet, on Spoon University.

Check out more good stuff from Spoon University here:

  • 12 ways to eat cookie butter
  • Ultimate Chipotle Menu Hacks
  • Copycat Chick-Fil-A sandwich recipe
  • The Science Behind Food Cravings
  • How to Make Your Own Almond Flour

Low-carb drinks – the best and the worst

This guide is based on scientific evidence, following our policy for evidence-based guides. Click for more info.

The quick answer: Water is perfect and zero carb, as is coffee and tea (without sugar, of course). The occasional glass of wine is fine too.

Check out this visual guide for more good options, and what to definitely avoid. Just remember, what you add to your drink is just as important as the drink itself!


The numbers represent grams of net carbs per normal serving size (like what you get if you order one in a restaurant). 1 The green numbers represent decent options on low carb. Drinks with asterisks have some special caveats. Keep reading for more details below.

Add a sugar cube to your coffee or tea and you add 4 grams of carbs (not good).

Size does matter

While sugary soda is always a bad idea on low carb, size matters. A large soft drink contains truly astonishing amounts of sugar with 159 grams in this example.

A small soft drink can keep you out of ketosis for a day, but the large ones could effect you for much longer, possibly an entire week! 2

Diet soft drinks – are artificial sweeteners OK or not?

Diet soft drinks come without carbs or calories. Instead, they contain artificial sweeteners like aspartame, sucralose, acesulfame K or stevia.

Many people believe diet drinks are safe, as they are free from calories. However, it’s not that simple, and these non-caloric sweeteners come with their own set of problems.

In short, diet drinks are probably less bad than regular sugary soda. But if you can wean yourself off the sweet drinks completely and enjoy water, that’s by far the best option. Learn more

Low-carb alcoholic drinks

What are the best low-carb alcoholic drinks? Beer, wine or something else?

Here’s the short answer: Wine is good, beer is usually not. However, there’s something else with no carbs at all. Spirits like vodka, whiskey and tequila have no net carbs. That doesn’t mean they have no calories, but when it comes to carb counting they are good options.

Low-carb drinks recipes

We have lots of recipes for great low-carb drinks, like keto hot chocolate or Butter coffee. Here are the most popular recipes right now:

Detailed carb-count list for low-carb drinks

Below is a detailed list of the number of grams of carbs in drinks.

Water 0
Water with lemon 0
Tea 0 (every sugar cube adds 4 grams)
Coffee 0 (adding milk adds about 1-3 grams of carbs)
Diet soft drink 0 (artificial sweeteners have other problems though)
Wine 2 (5 oz – 14 cl)
Coconut water 9 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Vegetable juice 11 (1 cup – 24 cl). The amount of carbs can vary, adding fruit juice adds more carbs.
Milk 11 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Soy milk 12 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Beer 13 (12 oz – 35 cl). The amount varies (low-carb beer guide).
Caffè latte 15 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Kombucha tea 10 (12 oz – 35 cl). This is the average of commercial teas. Homemade Kombucha tea varies with the time it has fermented, and can end up somewhat lower in carbs.
Orange juice 26 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Energy drink 28 (8.4 oz – 25 cl)
Vitamin water 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Ice tea 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Soft drink 39 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Smoothie 36 (12 oz – 35 cl). Varies depending on contents (low-carb smoothie recipes).
Frappuccino 50 (12 oz – 35 cl). Watch out for all sweet coffee drinks.
Milkshake 60 (10 oz – 30 cl)


Low-carb drinks – the best and the worst

This guide is based on scientific evidence, following our policy for evidence-based guides. Click for more info.

The quick answer: Water is perfect and zero carb, as is coffee and tea (without sugar, of course). The occasional glass of wine is fine too.

Check out this visual guide for more good options, and what to definitely avoid. Just remember, what you add to your drink is just as important as the drink itself!


The numbers represent grams of net carbs per normal serving size (like what you get if you order one in a restaurant). 1 The green numbers represent decent options on low carb. Drinks with asterisks have some special caveats. Keep reading for more details below.

Add a sugar cube to your coffee or tea and you add 4 grams of carbs (not good).

Size does matter

While sugary soda is always a bad idea on low carb, size matters. A large soft drink contains truly astonishing amounts of sugar with 159 grams in this example.

A small soft drink can keep you out of ketosis for a day, but the large ones could effect you for much longer, possibly an entire week! 2

Diet soft drinks – are artificial sweeteners OK or not?

Diet soft drinks come without carbs or calories. Instead, they contain artificial sweeteners like aspartame, sucralose, acesulfame K or stevia.

Many people believe diet drinks are safe, as they are free from calories. However, it’s not that simple, and these non-caloric sweeteners come with their own set of problems.

In short, diet drinks are probably less bad than regular sugary soda. But if you can wean yourself off the sweet drinks completely and enjoy water, that’s by far the best option. Learn more

Low-carb alcoholic drinks

What are the best low-carb alcoholic drinks? Beer, wine or something else?

Here’s the short answer: Wine is good, beer is usually not. However, there’s something else with no carbs at all. Spirits like vodka, whiskey and tequila have no net carbs. That doesn’t mean they have no calories, but when it comes to carb counting they are good options.

Low-carb drinks recipes

We have lots of recipes for great low-carb drinks, like keto hot chocolate or Butter coffee. Here are the most popular recipes right now:

Detailed carb-count list for low-carb drinks

Below is a detailed list of the number of grams of carbs in drinks.

Water 0
Water with lemon 0
Tea 0 (every sugar cube adds 4 grams)
Coffee 0 (adding milk adds about 1-3 grams of carbs)
Diet soft drink 0 (artificial sweeteners have other problems though)
Wine 2 (5 oz – 14 cl)
Coconut water 9 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Vegetable juice 11 (1 cup – 24 cl). The amount of carbs can vary, adding fruit juice adds more carbs.
Milk 11 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Soy milk 12 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Beer 13 (12 oz – 35 cl). The amount varies (low-carb beer guide).
Caffè latte 15 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Kombucha tea 10 (12 oz – 35 cl). This is the average of commercial teas. Homemade Kombucha tea varies with the time it has fermented, and can end up somewhat lower in carbs.
Orange juice 26 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Energy drink 28 (8.4 oz – 25 cl)
Vitamin water 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Ice tea 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Soft drink 39 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Smoothie 36 (12 oz – 35 cl). Varies depending on contents (low-carb smoothie recipes).
Frappuccino 50 (12 oz – 35 cl). Watch out for all sweet coffee drinks.
Milkshake 60 (10 oz – 30 cl)


Low-carb drinks – the best and the worst

This guide is based on scientific evidence, following our policy for evidence-based guides. Click for more info.

The quick answer: Water is perfect and zero carb, as is coffee and tea (without sugar, of course). The occasional glass of wine is fine too.

Check out this visual guide for more good options, and what to definitely avoid. Just remember, what you add to your drink is just as important as the drink itself!


The numbers represent grams of net carbs per normal serving size (like what you get if you order one in a restaurant). 1 The green numbers represent decent options on low carb. Drinks with asterisks have some special caveats. Keep reading for more details below.

Add a sugar cube to your coffee or tea and you add 4 grams of carbs (not good).

Size does matter

While sugary soda is always a bad idea on low carb, size matters. A large soft drink contains truly astonishing amounts of sugar with 159 grams in this example.

A small soft drink can keep you out of ketosis for a day, but the large ones could effect you for much longer, possibly an entire week! 2

Diet soft drinks – are artificial sweeteners OK or not?

Diet soft drinks come without carbs or calories. Instead, they contain artificial sweeteners like aspartame, sucralose, acesulfame K or stevia.

Many people believe diet drinks are safe, as they are free from calories. However, it’s not that simple, and these non-caloric sweeteners come with their own set of problems.

In short, diet drinks are probably less bad than regular sugary soda. But if you can wean yourself off the sweet drinks completely and enjoy water, that’s by far the best option. Learn more

Low-carb alcoholic drinks

What are the best low-carb alcoholic drinks? Beer, wine or something else?

Here’s the short answer: Wine is good, beer is usually not. However, there’s something else with no carbs at all. Spirits like vodka, whiskey and tequila have no net carbs. That doesn’t mean they have no calories, but when it comes to carb counting they are good options.

Low-carb drinks recipes

We have lots of recipes for great low-carb drinks, like keto hot chocolate or Butter coffee. Here are the most popular recipes right now:

Detailed carb-count list for low-carb drinks

Below is a detailed list of the number of grams of carbs in drinks.

Water 0
Water with lemon 0
Tea 0 (every sugar cube adds 4 grams)
Coffee 0 (adding milk adds about 1-3 grams of carbs)
Diet soft drink 0 (artificial sweeteners have other problems though)
Wine 2 (5 oz – 14 cl)
Coconut water 9 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Vegetable juice 11 (1 cup – 24 cl). The amount of carbs can vary, adding fruit juice adds more carbs.
Milk 11 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Soy milk 12 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Beer 13 (12 oz – 35 cl). The amount varies (low-carb beer guide).
Caffè latte 15 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Kombucha tea 10 (12 oz – 35 cl). This is the average of commercial teas. Homemade Kombucha tea varies with the time it has fermented, and can end up somewhat lower in carbs.
Orange juice 26 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Energy drink 28 (8.4 oz – 25 cl)
Vitamin water 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Ice tea 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Soft drink 39 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Smoothie 36 (12 oz – 35 cl). Varies depending on contents (low-carb smoothie recipes).
Frappuccino 50 (12 oz – 35 cl). Watch out for all sweet coffee drinks.
Milkshake 60 (10 oz – 30 cl)


Low-carb drinks – the best and the worst

This guide is based on scientific evidence, following our policy for evidence-based guides. Click for more info.

The quick answer: Water is perfect and zero carb, as is coffee and tea (without sugar, of course). The occasional glass of wine is fine too.

Check out this visual guide for more good options, and what to definitely avoid. Just remember, what you add to your drink is just as important as the drink itself!


The numbers represent grams of net carbs per normal serving size (like what you get if you order one in a restaurant). 1 The green numbers represent decent options on low carb. Drinks with asterisks have some special caveats. Keep reading for more details below.

Add a sugar cube to your coffee or tea and you add 4 grams of carbs (not good).

Size does matter

While sugary soda is always a bad idea on low carb, size matters. A large soft drink contains truly astonishing amounts of sugar with 159 grams in this example.

A small soft drink can keep you out of ketosis for a day, but the large ones could effect you for much longer, possibly an entire week! 2

Diet soft drinks – are artificial sweeteners OK or not?

Diet soft drinks come without carbs or calories. Instead, they contain artificial sweeteners like aspartame, sucralose, acesulfame K or stevia.

Many people believe diet drinks are safe, as they are free from calories. However, it’s not that simple, and these non-caloric sweeteners come with their own set of problems.

In short, diet drinks are probably less bad than regular sugary soda. But if you can wean yourself off the sweet drinks completely and enjoy water, that’s by far the best option. Learn more

Low-carb alcoholic drinks

What are the best low-carb alcoholic drinks? Beer, wine or something else?

Here’s the short answer: Wine is good, beer is usually not. However, there’s something else with no carbs at all. Spirits like vodka, whiskey and tequila have no net carbs. That doesn’t mean they have no calories, but when it comes to carb counting they are good options.

Low-carb drinks recipes

We have lots of recipes for great low-carb drinks, like keto hot chocolate or Butter coffee. Here are the most popular recipes right now:

Detailed carb-count list for low-carb drinks

Below is a detailed list of the number of grams of carbs in drinks.

Water 0
Water with lemon 0
Tea 0 (every sugar cube adds 4 grams)
Coffee 0 (adding milk adds about 1-3 grams of carbs)
Diet soft drink 0 (artificial sweeteners have other problems though)
Wine 2 (5 oz – 14 cl)
Coconut water 9 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Vegetable juice 11 (1 cup – 24 cl). The amount of carbs can vary, adding fruit juice adds more carbs.
Milk 11 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Soy milk 12 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Beer 13 (12 oz – 35 cl). The amount varies (low-carb beer guide).
Caffè latte 15 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Kombucha tea 10 (12 oz – 35 cl). This is the average of commercial teas. Homemade Kombucha tea varies with the time it has fermented, and can end up somewhat lower in carbs.
Orange juice 26 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Energy drink 28 (8.4 oz – 25 cl)
Vitamin water 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Ice tea 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Soft drink 39 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Smoothie 36 (12 oz – 35 cl). Varies depending on contents (low-carb smoothie recipes).
Frappuccino 50 (12 oz – 35 cl). Watch out for all sweet coffee drinks.
Milkshake 60 (10 oz – 30 cl)


Low-carb drinks – the best and the worst

This guide is based on scientific evidence, following our policy for evidence-based guides. Click for more info.

The quick answer: Water is perfect and zero carb, as is coffee and tea (without sugar, of course). The occasional glass of wine is fine too.

Check out this visual guide for more good options, and what to definitely avoid. Just remember, what you add to your drink is just as important as the drink itself!


The numbers represent grams of net carbs per normal serving size (like what you get if you order one in a restaurant). 1 The green numbers represent decent options on low carb. Drinks with asterisks have some special caveats. Keep reading for more details below.

Add a sugar cube to your coffee or tea and you add 4 grams of carbs (not good).

Size does matter

While sugary soda is always a bad idea on low carb, size matters. A large soft drink contains truly astonishing amounts of sugar with 159 grams in this example.

A small soft drink can keep you out of ketosis for a day, but the large ones could effect you for much longer, possibly an entire week! 2

Diet soft drinks – are artificial sweeteners OK or not?

Diet soft drinks come without carbs or calories. Instead, they contain artificial sweeteners like aspartame, sucralose, acesulfame K or stevia.

Many people believe diet drinks are safe, as they are free from calories. However, it’s not that simple, and these non-caloric sweeteners come with their own set of problems.

In short, diet drinks are probably less bad than regular sugary soda. But if you can wean yourself off the sweet drinks completely and enjoy water, that’s by far the best option. Learn more

Low-carb alcoholic drinks

What are the best low-carb alcoholic drinks? Beer, wine or something else?

Here’s the short answer: Wine is good, beer is usually not. However, there’s something else with no carbs at all. Spirits like vodka, whiskey and tequila have no net carbs. That doesn’t mean they have no calories, but when it comes to carb counting they are good options.

Low-carb drinks recipes

We have lots of recipes for great low-carb drinks, like keto hot chocolate or Butter coffee. Here are the most popular recipes right now:

Detailed carb-count list for low-carb drinks

Below is a detailed list of the number of grams of carbs in drinks.

Water 0
Water with lemon 0
Tea 0 (every sugar cube adds 4 grams)
Coffee 0 (adding milk adds about 1-3 grams of carbs)
Diet soft drink 0 (artificial sweeteners have other problems though)
Wine 2 (5 oz – 14 cl)
Coconut water 9 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Vegetable juice 11 (1 cup – 24 cl). The amount of carbs can vary, adding fruit juice adds more carbs.
Milk 11 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Soy milk 12 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Beer 13 (12 oz – 35 cl). The amount varies (low-carb beer guide).
Caffè latte 15 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Kombucha tea 10 (12 oz – 35 cl). This is the average of commercial teas. Homemade Kombucha tea varies with the time it has fermented, and can end up somewhat lower in carbs.
Orange juice 26 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Energy drink 28 (8.4 oz – 25 cl)
Vitamin water 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Ice tea 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Soft drink 39 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Smoothie 36 (12 oz – 35 cl). Varies depending on contents (low-carb smoothie recipes).
Frappuccino 50 (12 oz – 35 cl). Watch out for all sweet coffee drinks.
Milkshake 60 (10 oz – 30 cl)


Low-carb drinks – the best and the worst

This guide is based on scientific evidence, following our policy for evidence-based guides. Click for more info.

The quick answer: Water is perfect and zero carb, as is coffee and tea (without sugar, of course). The occasional glass of wine is fine too.

Check out this visual guide for more good options, and what to definitely avoid. Just remember, what you add to your drink is just as important as the drink itself!


The numbers represent grams of net carbs per normal serving size (like what you get if you order one in a restaurant). 1 The green numbers represent decent options on low carb. Drinks with asterisks have some special caveats. Keep reading for more details below.

Add a sugar cube to your coffee or tea and you add 4 grams of carbs (not good).

Size does matter

While sugary soda is always a bad idea on low carb, size matters. A large soft drink contains truly astonishing amounts of sugar with 159 grams in this example.

A small soft drink can keep you out of ketosis for a day, but the large ones could effect you for much longer, possibly an entire week! 2

Diet soft drinks – are artificial sweeteners OK or not?

Diet soft drinks come without carbs or calories. Instead, they contain artificial sweeteners like aspartame, sucralose, acesulfame K or stevia.

Many people believe diet drinks are safe, as they are free from calories. However, it’s not that simple, and these non-caloric sweeteners come with their own set of problems.

In short, diet drinks are probably less bad than regular sugary soda. But if you can wean yourself off the sweet drinks completely and enjoy water, that’s by far the best option. Learn more

Low-carb alcoholic drinks

What are the best low-carb alcoholic drinks? Beer, wine or something else?

Here’s the short answer: Wine is good, beer is usually not. However, there’s something else with no carbs at all. Spirits like vodka, whiskey and tequila have no net carbs. That doesn’t mean they have no calories, but when it comes to carb counting they are good options.

Low-carb drinks recipes

We have lots of recipes for great low-carb drinks, like keto hot chocolate or Butter coffee. Here are the most popular recipes right now:

Detailed carb-count list for low-carb drinks

Below is a detailed list of the number of grams of carbs in drinks.

Water 0
Water with lemon 0
Tea 0 (every sugar cube adds 4 grams)
Coffee 0 (adding milk adds about 1-3 grams of carbs)
Diet soft drink 0 (artificial sweeteners have other problems though)
Wine 2 (5 oz – 14 cl)
Coconut water 9 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Vegetable juice 11 (1 cup – 24 cl). The amount of carbs can vary, adding fruit juice adds more carbs.
Milk 11 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Soy milk 12 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Beer 13 (12 oz – 35 cl). The amount varies (low-carb beer guide).
Caffè latte 15 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Kombucha tea 10 (12 oz – 35 cl). This is the average of commercial teas. Homemade Kombucha tea varies with the time it has fermented, and can end up somewhat lower in carbs.
Orange juice 26 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Energy drink 28 (8.4 oz – 25 cl)
Vitamin water 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Ice tea 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Soft drink 39 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Smoothie 36 (12 oz – 35 cl). Varies depending on contents (low-carb smoothie recipes).
Frappuccino 50 (12 oz – 35 cl). Watch out for all sweet coffee drinks.
Milkshake 60 (10 oz – 30 cl)


Low-carb drinks – the best and the worst

This guide is based on scientific evidence, following our policy for evidence-based guides. Click for more info.

The quick answer: Water is perfect and zero carb, as is coffee and tea (without sugar, of course). The occasional glass of wine is fine too.

Check out this visual guide for more good options, and what to definitely avoid. Just remember, what you add to your drink is just as important as the drink itself!


The numbers represent grams of net carbs per normal serving size (like what you get if you order one in a restaurant). 1 The green numbers represent decent options on low carb. Drinks with asterisks have some special caveats. Keep reading for more details below.

Add a sugar cube to your coffee or tea and you add 4 grams of carbs (not good).

Size does matter

While sugary soda is always a bad idea on low carb, size matters. A large soft drink contains truly astonishing amounts of sugar with 159 grams in this example.

A small soft drink can keep you out of ketosis for a day, but the large ones could effect you for much longer, possibly an entire week! 2

Diet soft drinks – are artificial sweeteners OK or not?

Diet soft drinks come without carbs or calories. Instead, they contain artificial sweeteners like aspartame, sucralose, acesulfame K or stevia.

Many people believe diet drinks are safe, as they are free from calories. However, it’s not that simple, and these non-caloric sweeteners come with their own set of problems.

In short, diet drinks are probably less bad than regular sugary soda. But if you can wean yourself off the sweet drinks completely and enjoy water, that’s by far the best option. Learn more

Low-carb alcoholic drinks

What are the best low-carb alcoholic drinks? Beer, wine or something else?

Here’s the short answer: Wine is good, beer is usually not. However, there’s something else with no carbs at all. Spirits like vodka, whiskey and tequila have no net carbs. That doesn’t mean they have no calories, but when it comes to carb counting they are good options.

Low-carb drinks recipes

We have lots of recipes for great low-carb drinks, like keto hot chocolate or Butter coffee. Here are the most popular recipes right now:

Detailed carb-count list for low-carb drinks

Below is a detailed list of the number of grams of carbs in drinks.

Water 0
Water with lemon 0
Tea 0 (every sugar cube adds 4 grams)
Coffee 0 (adding milk adds about 1-3 grams of carbs)
Diet soft drink 0 (artificial sweeteners have other problems though)
Wine 2 (5 oz – 14 cl)
Coconut water 9 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Vegetable juice 11 (1 cup – 24 cl). The amount of carbs can vary, adding fruit juice adds more carbs.
Milk 11 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Soy milk 12 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Beer 13 (12 oz – 35 cl). The amount varies (low-carb beer guide).
Caffè latte 15 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Kombucha tea 10 (12 oz – 35 cl). This is the average of commercial teas. Homemade Kombucha tea varies with the time it has fermented, and can end up somewhat lower in carbs.
Orange juice 26 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Energy drink 28 (8.4 oz – 25 cl)
Vitamin water 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Ice tea 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Soft drink 39 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Smoothie 36 (12 oz – 35 cl). Varies depending on contents (low-carb smoothie recipes).
Frappuccino 50 (12 oz – 35 cl). Watch out for all sweet coffee drinks.
Milkshake 60 (10 oz – 30 cl)


Low-carb drinks – the best and the worst

This guide is based on scientific evidence, following our policy for evidence-based guides. Click for more info.

The quick answer: Water is perfect and zero carb, as is coffee and tea (without sugar, of course). The occasional glass of wine is fine too.

Check out this visual guide for more good options, and what to definitely avoid. Just remember, what you add to your drink is just as important as the drink itself!


The numbers represent grams of net carbs per normal serving size (like what you get if you order one in a restaurant). 1 The green numbers represent decent options on low carb. Drinks with asterisks have some special caveats. Keep reading for more details below.

Add a sugar cube to your coffee or tea and you add 4 grams of carbs (not good).

Size does matter

While sugary soda is always a bad idea on low carb, size matters. A large soft drink contains truly astonishing amounts of sugar with 159 grams in this example.

A small soft drink can keep you out of ketosis for a day, but the large ones could effect you for much longer, possibly an entire week! 2

Diet soft drinks – are artificial sweeteners OK or not?

Diet soft drinks come without carbs or calories. Instead, they contain artificial sweeteners like aspartame, sucralose, acesulfame K or stevia.

Many people believe diet drinks are safe, as they are free from calories. However, it’s not that simple, and these non-caloric sweeteners come with their own set of problems.

In short, diet drinks are probably less bad than regular sugary soda. But if you can wean yourself off the sweet drinks completely and enjoy water, that’s by far the best option. Learn more

Low-carb alcoholic drinks

What are the best low-carb alcoholic drinks? Beer, wine or something else?

Here’s the short answer: Wine is good, beer is usually not. However, there’s something else with no carbs at all. Spirits like vodka, whiskey and tequila have no net carbs. That doesn’t mean they have no calories, but when it comes to carb counting they are good options.

Low-carb drinks recipes

We have lots of recipes for great low-carb drinks, like keto hot chocolate or Butter coffee. Here are the most popular recipes right now:

Detailed carb-count list for low-carb drinks

Below is a detailed list of the number of grams of carbs in drinks.

Water 0
Water with lemon 0
Tea 0 (every sugar cube adds 4 grams)
Coffee 0 (adding milk adds about 1-3 grams of carbs)
Diet soft drink 0 (artificial sweeteners have other problems though)
Wine 2 (5 oz – 14 cl)
Coconut water 9 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Vegetable juice 11 (1 cup – 24 cl). The amount of carbs can vary, adding fruit juice adds more carbs.
Milk 11 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Soy milk 12 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Beer 13 (12 oz – 35 cl). The amount varies (low-carb beer guide).
Caffè latte 15 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Kombucha tea 10 (12 oz – 35 cl). This is the average of commercial teas. Homemade Kombucha tea varies with the time it has fermented, and can end up somewhat lower in carbs.
Orange juice 26 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Energy drink 28 (8.4 oz – 25 cl)
Vitamin water 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Ice tea 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Soft drink 39 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Smoothie 36 (12 oz – 35 cl). Varies depending on contents (low-carb smoothie recipes).
Frappuccino 50 (12 oz – 35 cl). Watch out for all sweet coffee drinks.
Milkshake 60 (10 oz – 30 cl)


Low-carb drinks – the best and the worst

This guide is based on scientific evidence, following our policy for evidence-based guides. Click for more info.

The quick answer: Water is perfect and zero carb, as is coffee and tea (without sugar, of course). The occasional glass of wine is fine too.

Check out this visual guide for more good options, and what to definitely avoid. Just remember, what you add to your drink is just as important as the drink itself!


The numbers represent grams of net carbs per normal serving size (like what you get if you order one in a restaurant). 1 The green numbers represent decent options on low carb. Drinks with asterisks have some special caveats. Keep reading for more details below.

Add a sugar cube to your coffee or tea and you add 4 grams of carbs (not good).

Size does matter

While sugary soda is always a bad idea on low carb, size matters. A large soft drink contains truly astonishing amounts of sugar with 159 grams in this example.

A small soft drink can keep you out of ketosis for a day, but the large ones could effect you for much longer, possibly an entire week! 2

Diet soft drinks – are artificial sweeteners OK or not?

Diet soft drinks come without carbs or calories. Instead, they contain artificial sweeteners like aspartame, sucralose, acesulfame K or stevia.

Many people believe diet drinks are safe, as they are free from calories. However, it’s not that simple, and these non-caloric sweeteners come with their own set of problems.

In short, diet drinks are probably less bad than regular sugary soda. But if you can wean yourself off the sweet drinks completely and enjoy water, that’s by far the best option. Learn more

Low-carb alcoholic drinks

What are the best low-carb alcoholic drinks? Beer, wine or something else?

Here’s the short answer: Wine is good, beer is usually not. However, there’s something else with no carbs at all. Spirits like vodka, whiskey and tequila have no net carbs. That doesn’t mean they have no calories, but when it comes to carb counting they are good options.

Low-carb drinks recipes

We have lots of recipes for great low-carb drinks, like keto hot chocolate or Butter coffee. Here are the most popular recipes right now:

Detailed carb-count list for low-carb drinks

Below is a detailed list of the number of grams of carbs in drinks.

Water 0
Water with lemon 0
Tea 0 (every sugar cube adds 4 grams)
Coffee 0 (adding milk adds about 1-3 grams of carbs)
Diet soft drink 0 (artificial sweeteners have other problems though)
Wine 2 (5 oz – 14 cl)
Coconut water 9 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Vegetable juice 11 (1 cup – 24 cl). The amount of carbs can vary, adding fruit juice adds more carbs.
Milk 11 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Soy milk 12 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Beer 13 (12 oz – 35 cl). The amount varies (low-carb beer guide).
Caffè latte 15 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Kombucha tea 10 (12 oz – 35 cl). This is the average of commercial teas. Homemade Kombucha tea varies with the time it has fermented, and can end up somewhat lower in carbs.
Orange juice 26 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Energy drink 28 (8.4 oz – 25 cl)
Vitamin water 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Ice tea 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Soft drink 39 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Smoothie 36 (12 oz – 35 cl). Varies depending on contents (low-carb smoothie recipes).
Frappuccino 50 (12 oz – 35 cl). Watch out for all sweet coffee drinks.
Milkshake 60 (10 oz – 30 cl)


Low-carb drinks – the best and the worst

This guide is based on scientific evidence, following our policy for evidence-based guides. Click for more info.

The quick answer: Water is perfect and zero carb, as is coffee and tea (without sugar, of course). The occasional glass of wine is fine too.

Check out this visual guide for more good options, and what to definitely avoid. Just remember, what you add to your drink is just as important as the drink itself!


The numbers represent grams of net carbs per normal serving size (like what you get if you order one in a restaurant). 1 The green numbers represent decent options on low carb. Drinks with asterisks have some special caveats. Keep reading for more details below.

Add a sugar cube to your coffee or tea and you add 4 grams of carbs (not good).

Size does matter

While sugary soda is always a bad idea on low carb, size matters. A large soft drink contains truly astonishing amounts of sugar with 159 grams in this example.

A small soft drink can keep you out of ketosis for a day, but the large ones could effect you for much longer, possibly an entire week! 2

Diet soft drinks – are artificial sweeteners OK or not?

Diet soft drinks come without carbs or calories. Instead, they contain artificial sweeteners like aspartame, sucralose, acesulfame K or stevia.

Many people believe diet drinks are safe, as they are free from calories. However, it’s not that simple, and these non-caloric sweeteners come with their own set of problems.

In short, diet drinks are probably less bad than regular sugary soda. But if you can wean yourself off the sweet drinks completely and enjoy water, that’s by far the best option. Learn more

Low-carb alcoholic drinks

What are the best low-carb alcoholic drinks? Beer, wine or something else?

Here’s the short answer: Wine is good, beer is usually not. However, there’s something else with no carbs at all. Spirits like vodka, whiskey and tequila have no net carbs. That doesn’t mean they have no calories, but when it comes to carb counting they are good options.

Low-carb drinks recipes

We have lots of recipes for great low-carb drinks, like keto hot chocolate or Butter coffee. Here are the most popular recipes right now:

Detailed carb-count list for low-carb drinks

Below is a detailed list of the number of grams of carbs in drinks.

Water 0
Water with lemon 0
Tea 0 (every sugar cube adds 4 grams)
Coffee 0 (adding milk adds about 1-3 grams of carbs)
Diet soft drink 0 (artificial sweeteners have other problems though)
Wine 2 (5 oz – 14 cl)
Coconut water 9 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Vegetable juice 11 (1 cup – 24 cl). The amount of carbs can vary, adding fruit juice adds more carbs.
Milk 11 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Soy milk 12 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Beer 13 (12 oz – 35 cl). The amount varies (low-carb beer guide).
Caffè latte 15 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Kombucha tea 10 (12 oz – 35 cl). This is the average of commercial teas. Homemade Kombucha tea varies with the time it has fermented, and can end up somewhat lower in carbs.
Orange juice 26 (1 cup – 24 cl)
Energy drink 28 (8.4 oz – 25 cl)
Vitamin water 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Ice tea 32 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Soft drink 39 (12 oz – 35 cl)
Smoothie 36 (12 oz – 35 cl). Varies depending on contents (low-carb smoothie recipes).
Frappuccino 50 (12 oz – 35 cl). Watch out for all sweet coffee drinks.
Milkshake 60 (10 oz – 30 cl)



Comments:

  1. Brunelle

    It is happiness!

  2. Manny

    I like it, and it is relevant and interesting!

  3. Bowdyn

    I congratulate, your idea is brilliant

  4. Trenton

    You are wrong. Let us try to discuss this. Write to me in PM.

  5. Garfield

    I apologize for interfering ... I am familiar with this situation. Ready to help.



Write a message