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Who Loves Starbucks More, Republicans or Democrats?

Who Loves Starbucks More, Republicans or Democrats?


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Democrats may view the chain more favorably than their Republicans counterparts

Who needs their Starbucks Frappucinos more — the liberals or the conservatives? Although the coffee chain is based in largely Democratic Seattle, Washington, both ends of the political spectrum view the original and ubiquitous coffee chain positively.

In the beginning of this year, the YouGov BrandIndex Buzz asked respondents a simple question, and scored their responses: “Have you heard anything positive or negative about this brand?” Forbes reported the scores for the chain at the beginning of the year were 15.7 for Democrats, and 14.6 for Republicans. While the scores remain generally positive, the gap has widened since previous surveys. Recent scores are at 19.3 for Democrats and 10.7 among Republicans. The difference has grown significantly over the last six months, especially across party lines.

What makes liberals cling to their Starbucks cups more? It appears that Starbucks’s recent support of gay marriage in Washington State could be responsible for the widening gap. Despite efforts led by CEO Howard Shultz to discourage political donations to all parties by other chiefs and other partisan affiliations, the Republican response to the chain has steadily declined since Starbucks declared its support for marriage equality for same-sex couples. The National Organization for Marriage, a conservative group, launched an anti-Starbucks campaign in response to the announcement.

Conversely, support from Democrat consumers has increased since the statement. Liberal consumers tend to appreciate the values of the company, particularly their use of fair trade products and recycling campaign efforts, and their recognition as an ethical employer by Etisphere. We guess the Republicans may soon be jumping ship to another coffee chain.


Starbucks has become a target of Trump-loving conservatives — and that's great news for the brand

The most recent source of Starbucks outrage is the company's plan to hire 10,000 refugees in the next five years, in response to President Donald Trump's executive order that in part barred refugees from entering the US.

But despite the threats of boycott, Starbucks isn't stepping back — and experts say that's a smart decision.

"Big, bold action will pay off," Chris Allieri, founder of the communications and marketing firm Mulberry & Astor, told Business Insider. "Starbucks venturing out on its own shows leadership."

Allieri said he believes customers will demand corporate responses to Trump's executive orders that affect civil liberties such as immigration and LGBT rights. By coming out with a strong statement and clear actions, Starbucks is ahead of the competition, he says.

According to a Harvard Business School study, 38% of Americans believe CEOs have a responsibility speak out on controversial issues, as long as they directly apply to the company's business. As a chain with locations in 75 countries, Starbucks' wheelhouse could include international politics.

"It's impossible not to make enemies when companies enter the political arena, but from a business point of view, Schultz is probably right to associate Starbucks with pro-immigration stances that could tend to lessen anti-American sentiment in international markets," Vlae Kershner wrote in Seeking Alpha, referring to Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz.

The most recent movement to boycott Starbucks is the latest in a long series of backlashes against the chain's political statements. With experience comes knowledge, making Starbucks uniquely positioned to build its brand by taking on Trump in 2017.


Starbucks has become a target of Trump-loving conservatives — and that's great news for the brand

The most recent source of Starbucks outrage is the company's plan to hire 10,000 refugees in the next five years, in response to President Donald Trump's executive order that in part barred refugees from entering the US.

But despite the threats of boycott, Starbucks isn't stepping back — and experts say that's a smart decision.

"Big, bold action will pay off," Chris Allieri, founder of the communications and marketing firm Mulberry & Astor, told Business Insider. "Starbucks venturing out on its own shows leadership."

Allieri said he believes customers will demand corporate responses to Trump's executive orders that affect civil liberties such as immigration and LGBT rights. By coming out with a strong statement and clear actions, Starbucks is ahead of the competition, he says.

According to a Harvard Business School study, 38% of Americans believe CEOs have a responsibility speak out on controversial issues, as long as they directly apply to the company's business. As a chain with locations in 75 countries, Starbucks' wheelhouse could include international politics.

"It's impossible not to make enemies when companies enter the political arena, but from a business point of view, Schultz is probably right to associate Starbucks with pro-immigration stances that could tend to lessen anti-American sentiment in international markets," Vlae Kershner wrote in Seeking Alpha, referring to Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz.

The most recent movement to boycott Starbucks is the latest in a long series of backlashes against the chain's political statements. With experience comes knowledge, making Starbucks uniquely positioned to build its brand by taking on Trump in 2017.


Starbucks has become a target of Trump-loving conservatives — and that's great news for the brand

The most recent source of Starbucks outrage is the company's plan to hire 10,000 refugees in the next five years, in response to President Donald Trump's executive order that in part barred refugees from entering the US.

But despite the threats of boycott, Starbucks isn't stepping back — and experts say that's a smart decision.

"Big, bold action will pay off," Chris Allieri, founder of the communications and marketing firm Mulberry & Astor, told Business Insider. "Starbucks venturing out on its own shows leadership."

Allieri said he believes customers will demand corporate responses to Trump's executive orders that affect civil liberties such as immigration and LGBT rights. By coming out with a strong statement and clear actions, Starbucks is ahead of the competition, he says.

According to a Harvard Business School study, 38% of Americans believe CEOs have a responsibility speak out on controversial issues, as long as they directly apply to the company's business. As a chain with locations in 75 countries, Starbucks' wheelhouse could include international politics.

"It's impossible not to make enemies when companies enter the political arena, but from a business point of view, Schultz is probably right to associate Starbucks with pro-immigration stances that could tend to lessen anti-American sentiment in international markets," Vlae Kershner wrote in Seeking Alpha, referring to Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz.

The most recent movement to boycott Starbucks is the latest in a long series of backlashes against the chain's political statements. With experience comes knowledge, making Starbucks uniquely positioned to build its brand by taking on Trump in 2017.


Starbucks has become a target of Trump-loving conservatives — and that's great news for the brand

The most recent source of Starbucks outrage is the company's plan to hire 10,000 refugees in the next five years, in response to President Donald Trump's executive order that in part barred refugees from entering the US.

But despite the threats of boycott, Starbucks isn't stepping back — and experts say that's a smart decision.

"Big, bold action will pay off," Chris Allieri, founder of the communications and marketing firm Mulberry & Astor, told Business Insider. "Starbucks venturing out on its own shows leadership."

Allieri said he believes customers will demand corporate responses to Trump's executive orders that affect civil liberties such as immigration and LGBT rights. By coming out with a strong statement and clear actions, Starbucks is ahead of the competition, he says.

According to a Harvard Business School study, 38% of Americans believe CEOs have a responsibility speak out on controversial issues, as long as they directly apply to the company's business. As a chain with locations in 75 countries, Starbucks' wheelhouse could include international politics.

"It's impossible not to make enemies when companies enter the political arena, but from a business point of view, Schultz is probably right to associate Starbucks with pro-immigration stances that could tend to lessen anti-American sentiment in international markets," Vlae Kershner wrote in Seeking Alpha, referring to Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz.

The most recent movement to boycott Starbucks is the latest in a long series of backlashes against the chain's political statements. With experience comes knowledge, making Starbucks uniquely positioned to build its brand by taking on Trump in 2017.


Starbucks has become a target of Trump-loving conservatives — and that's great news for the brand

The most recent source of Starbucks outrage is the company's plan to hire 10,000 refugees in the next five years, in response to President Donald Trump's executive order that in part barred refugees from entering the US.

But despite the threats of boycott, Starbucks isn't stepping back — and experts say that's a smart decision.

"Big, bold action will pay off," Chris Allieri, founder of the communications and marketing firm Mulberry & Astor, told Business Insider. "Starbucks venturing out on its own shows leadership."

Allieri said he believes customers will demand corporate responses to Trump's executive orders that affect civil liberties such as immigration and LGBT rights. By coming out with a strong statement and clear actions, Starbucks is ahead of the competition, he says.

According to a Harvard Business School study, 38% of Americans believe CEOs have a responsibility speak out on controversial issues, as long as they directly apply to the company's business. As a chain with locations in 75 countries, Starbucks' wheelhouse could include international politics.

"It's impossible not to make enemies when companies enter the political arena, but from a business point of view, Schultz is probably right to associate Starbucks with pro-immigration stances that could tend to lessen anti-American sentiment in international markets," Vlae Kershner wrote in Seeking Alpha, referring to Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz.

The most recent movement to boycott Starbucks is the latest in a long series of backlashes against the chain's political statements. With experience comes knowledge, making Starbucks uniquely positioned to build its brand by taking on Trump in 2017.


Starbucks has become a target of Trump-loving conservatives — and that's great news for the brand

The most recent source of Starbucks outrage is the company's plan to hire 10,000 refugees in the next five years, in response to President Donald Trump's executive order that in part barred refugees from entering the US.

But despite the threats of boycott, Starbucks isn't stepping back — and experts say that's a smart decision.

"Big, bold action will pay off," Chris Allieri, founder of the communications and marketing firm Mulberry & Astor, told Business Insider. "Starbucks venturing out on its own shows leadership."

Allieri said he believes customers will demand corporate responses to Trump's executive orders that affect civil liberties such as immigration and LGBT rights. By coming out with a strong statement and clear actions, Starbucks is ahead of the competition, he says.

According to a Harvard Business School study, 38% of Americans believe CEOs have a responsibility speak out on controversial issues, as long as they directly apply to the company's business. As a chain with locations in 75 countries, Starbucks' wheelhouse could include international politics.

"It's impossible not to make enemies when companies enter the political arena, but from a business point of view, Schultz is probably right to associate Starbucks with pro-immigration stances that could tend to lessen anti-American sentiment in international markets," Vlae Kershner wrote in Seeking Alpha, referring to Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz.

The most recent movement to boycott Starbucks is the latest in a long series of backlashes against the chain's political statements. With experience comes knowledge, making Starbucks uniquely positioned to build its brand by taking on Trump in 2017.


Starbucks has become a target of Trump-loving conservatives — and that's great news for the brand

The most recent source of Starbucks outrage is the company's plan to hire 10,000 refugees in the next five years, in response to President Donald Trump's executive order that in part barred refugees from entering the US.

But despite the threats of boycott, Starbucks isn't stepping back — and experts say that's a smart decision.

"Big, bold action will pay off," Chris Allieri, founder of the communications and marketing firm Mulberry & Astor, told Business Insider. "Starbucks venturing out on its own shows leadership."

Allieri said he believes customers will demand corporate responses to Trump's executive orders that affect civil liberties such as immigration and LGBT rights. By coming out with a strong statement and clear actions, Starbucks is ahead of the competition, he says.

According to a Harvard Business School study, 38% of Americans believe CEOs have a responsibility speak out on controversial issues, as long as they directly apply to the company's business. As a chain with locations in 75 countries, Starbucks' wheelhouse could include international politics.

"It's impossible not to make enemies when companies enter the political arena, but from a business point of view, Schultz is probably right to associate Starbucks with pro-immigration stances that could tend to lessen anti-American sentiment in international markets," Vlae Kershner wrote in Seeking Alpha, referring to Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz.

The most recent movement to boycott Starbucks is the latest in a long series of backlashes against the chain's political statements. With experience comes knowledge, making Starbucks uniquely positioned to build its brand by taking on Trump in 2017.


Starbucks has become a target of Trump-loving conservatives — and that's great news for the brand

The most recent source of Starbucks outrage is the company's plan to hire 10,000 refugees in the next five years, in response to President Donald Trump's executive order that in part barred refugees from entering the US.

But despite the threats of boycott, Starbucks isn't stepping back — and experts say that's a smart decision.

"Big, bold action will pay off," Chris Allieri, founder of the communications and marketing firm Mulberry & Astor, told Business Insider. "Starbucks venturing out on its own shows leadership."

Allieri said he believes customers will demand corporate responses to Trump's executive orders that affect civil liberties such as immigration and LGBT rights. By coming out with a strong statement and clear actions, Starbucks is ahead of the competition, he says.

According to a Harvard Business School study, 38% of Americans believe CEOs have a responsibility speak out on controversial issues, as long as they directly apply to the company's business. As a chain with locations in 75 countries, Starbucks' wheelhouse could include international politics.

"It's impossible not to make enemies when companies enter the political arena, but from a business point of view, Schultz is probably right to associate Starbucks with pro-immigration stances that could tend to lessen anti-American sentiment in international markets," Vlae Kershner wrote in Seeking Alpha, referring to Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz.

The most recent movement to boycott Starbucks is the latest in a long series of backlashes against the chain's political statements. With experience comes knowledge, making Starbucks uniquely positioned to build its brand by taking on Trump in 2017.


Starbucks has become a target of Trump-loving conservatives — and that's great news for the brand

The most recent source of Starbucks outrage is the company's plan to hire 10,000 refugees in the next five years, in response to President Donald Trump's executive order that in part barred refugees from entering the US.

But despite the threats of boycott, Starbucks isn't stepping back — and experts say that's a smart decision.

"Big, bold action will pay off," Chris Allieri, founder of the communications and marketing firm Mulberry & Astor, told Business Insider. "Starbucks venturing out on its own shows leadership."

Allieri said he believes customers will demand corporate responses to Trump's executive orders that affect civil liberties such as immigration and LGBT rights. By coming out with a strong statement and clear actions, Starbucks is ahead of the competition, he says.

According to a Harvard Business School study, 38% of Americans believe CEOs have a responsibility speak out on controversial issues, as long as they directly apply to the company's business. As a chain with locations in 75 countries, Starbucks' wheelhouse could include international politics.

"It's impossible not to make enemies when companies enter the political arena, but from a business point of view, Schultz is probably right to associate Starbucks with pro-immigration stances that could tend to lessen anti-American sentiment in international markets," Vlae Kershner wrote in Seeking Alpha, referring to Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz.

The most recent movement to boycott Starbucks is the latest in a long series of backlashes against the chain's political statements. With experience comes knowledge, making Starbucks uniquely positioned to build its brand by taking on Trump in 2017.


Starbucks has become a target of Trump-loving conservatives — and that's great news for the brand

The most recent source of Starbucks outrage is the company's plan to hire 10,000 refugees in the next five years, in response to President Donald Trump's executive order that in part barred refugees from entering the US.

But despite the threats of boycott, Starbucks isn't stepping back — and experts say that's a smart decision.

"Big, bold action will pay off," Chris Allieri, founder of the communications and marketing firm Mulberry & Astor, told Business Insider. "Starbucks venturing out on its own shows leadership."

Allieri said he believes customers will demand corporate responses to Trump's executive orders that affect civil liberties such as immigration and LGBT rights. By coming out with a strong statement and clear actions, Starbucks is ahead of the competition, he says.

According to a Harvard Business School study, 38% of Americans believe CEOs have a responsibility speak out on controversial issues, as long as they directly apply to the company's business. As a chain with locations in 75 countries, Starbucks' wheelhouse could include international politics.

"It's impossible not to make enemies when companies enter the political arena, but from a business point of view, Schultz is probably right to associate Starbucks with pro-immigration stances that could tend to lessen anti-American sentiment in international markets," Vlae Kershner wrote in Seeking Alpha, referring to Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz.

The most recent movement to boycott Starbucks is the latest in a long series of backlashes against the chain's political statements. With experience comes knowledge, making Starbucks uniquely positioned to build its brand by taking on Trump in 2017.