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Carroty Mac and Cheese Recipe

Carroty Mac and Cheese Recipe


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Like most little kids, Dahlia loves macaroni and cheese, and I‘ve made it for her in many guises, running the gamut of techniques. My aim is always the same — to make the dish quickly with a minimum of fuss and to use a maximum of vegetables that she will tolerate and not pick out.

This is one of both our favorites. It’s comforting, crusty-topped, soft-centered, and very cheesy — but not at all sophisticated. Just simple, kid-friendly, homemade food with the added grown-up appeal of lots of healthful carrots tossed into the mix.

It’s a straightforward recipe that comes together without much fuss, other than having to grate some carrots. But to make up for that, I’ve eliminated the need to make a cheese sauce on the top of the stove. Instead, I toss the hot pasta with grated Cheddar, butter, sour cream for creaminess, and eggs to hold it all together. The grated carrots get boiled along with the pasta, so cooking them isn’t an extra step. And the tiny orange shreds look so much like the Cheddar that your kids might not even notice they are there. Dahlia certainly hasn’t, and while I’ve never lied to her about their inclusion, I might have left out the word carrot in the dish description — accidentally, of course.

This is one of those macaroni and cheeses with an eggy custard base that puffs as it cooks, and is cut into squares to serve, like a casserole, as opposed to that gooey, creamy, stove-top béchamel sauce version. Feed this dish to the kids as is; grown-ups should indulge with a squirt of fiery Sriracha or other hot sauce all over the top.

You can vary the cheese to give this rather plain (if tasty) dish more personality. Gruyère, aged Cheddar, pecorino, and aged Gouda will all add a sophisticated allure that will raise it above mere kids’ food.

Click here to see the Outstanding Mac and Cheese Recipes story.

Notes

*Note: If you’re grating your Cheddar cheese in the food processor, you don’t have to wash out the machine before grating the carrots, or vice versa.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 stick unsalted butter, cut into pieces, plus more for greasing
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more for cooking pasta
  • 2 cups whole-wheat macaroni
  • 2 1/2 cups carrot, grated coarsely
  • 3 cups sharp Cheddar cheese, grated*
  • 3/4 cups sour cream
  • 1/4 cup whole milk
  • 2 large eggs
  • 3/4 teaspoons mustard powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, grated finely

Carroty macaroni & cheese (an excerpt from A Way to Garden)

A GREAT IDEA FROM A GREAT BLOG. I’ll take it! This better-for-you mac & cheese recipe comes from Melissa Clark’s book, “Cook This Now”, by way of the best gardening blog around, A Way to Garden. An excerpt from Margret’s masterful gardening site introduces one of my favorite makeover ideas for comfort food:

MELISSA CLARK IS ONE OF US. The prolific cookbook author and “The New York Times” food columnist has a homegrown Dahlia (her young daughter) knows a rutabaga from a turnip (so many people don’t!), and is intrepid in harvesting year-round farm-and-garden gleanings—if not in her own backyard, then in Brooklyn’s Grand Army Plaza Farmers’ Market, where she has been a year-round customer for years, come hell or ice age. With her latest, “Cook This Now,” the hard part will be figuring out which of 120 recipes to start with. Win one of two copies I’ve bought to share—and get her recipe for Carroty Mac and Cheese right now.

(NOTE: THIS GIVEAWAY HAS ENDED.)

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Foodlets is about trying to raise kids who eat real food. About cooking only one dinner. About simple swaps to make any recipe healthier. About transforming "grown up" food into kid-friendly fare. And most of all, about the actually enjoying meals as a family. These are our hits and misses (you know, you've tried to make dinner before) and there's nothing I'd rather share with you. Except this: if I can do it, you can too. Let's feed some kids.

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Creamy Carrot Mac and Cheese

I’m often asked what my routine is for getting dinner on the table. It’s sort of a shoot-from-the-hip style that’s based on what’s in the fridge, what looks good at the market, and most importantly, what I’m in the mood to cook and eat (the major upside of being at the helm of the stove). I’m not nearly as ordered as many of you. There is little advanced planning no “sandwich night” or “crock pot Wednesday” or “meatless Monday.” Once in a blue moon we do indulge in “anything night,” which means I’m too tuckered out to cook and the kids eat whatever they consider dinner while I avert my eyes.

All that being said, I do have a number of dishes in my repertoire that rotate in on a pretty regular basis. Included is this Creamy Carrot Mac and Cheese, which is usually made at the request of my youngest, Virginia, who is a big fan

Creamy Carrot Mac and Cheese is adapted from a recipe by Jeremy Fox, a chef who developed a reputation for working magic with vegetables. This dish delivers a sizable amount of vegetables in every serving. Swapping out some of the cheese for carrots also means it’s markedly lower in fat and calories than the traditional approach. Make it with whole grain pasta, and you add fiber as well.


Cook This Now

Like most little kids, Dahlia loves macaroni and cheese, and I've made it for her in many guises, running the gamut of techniques. My aim is always the same—to make the dish quickly with a minimum of fuss, and to use a maximum of vegetables that she will tolerate and not pick out. This is one of both our favorites. It's comforting, crusty topped, soft centered, and very cheesy—but not at all sophisticated. Just simple, kid-friendly, homemade food with the added grown-up appeal of lots of healthful carrots tossed into the mix. I got the idea from a chef's recipe in a glossy food magazine. The chef called for cooking carrots in butter and orange juice, pureeing them, and using the puree as a sauce for mac and cheese. I tried the recipe as written and was disappointed. It was a lot of work, and I didn't like the sweetness of the citrus fruit interfering with my cheesy goodness. So I decided to come up with my own simplified and ultra-Cheddary version. It was a huge hit with the under-three crowd and their parents, too. It's a straightforward recipe that comes together without much fuss, other than having to grate some carrots. But to make up for that, I've eliminated the need to make a cheese sauce on the top of the stove. Instead, I toss the hot pasta with grated cheddar, butter, sour cream for creaminess, and eggs to hold it all together. The grated carrots get boiled along with the pasta, so cooking them isn't an extra step. And the tiny orange shreds look so much like the cheddar that your kids might not even notice they are there. Dahlia certainly hasn't, and while I've never lied to her about their inclusion, I might have left out the word carrot in the dish description—accidentally, of course.

Average user rating 3.5 / 4 Reviews 39 Percentage of reviewers who will make this recipe again 92 %

Cumin Seed Roasted Cauliflower with Salted Yogurt, Mint, and Pomegranate Seeds

When the nights turn blustery and the temperature drops, I know that roasted vegetable season has arrived, and I embrace it with reckless abandon. I'll roast any kind of sturdy vegetable that I can cut up and fit into my oven, but one of my favorites is cauliflower, preferably tossed with whole cumin seeds. Not only does the cumin act as a natural remedy to help reduce the dreaded intestinal gas factor (or so I've been told), but it also adds a pleasant earthy flavor to balance the assertive tang of the vegetable. Roasted cauliflower with cumin makes a nice and simple side dish. Even Dahlia will eat it if she's distracted enough. But recently I made it into lunch. I roasted up a head all for myself, and added a topping of salted yogurt (which is simply a good, full-fat yogurt with a little kosher salt mixed in), a few leftover pomegranate seeds (which I can buy at my local market already picked out of the husk), and a smattering of bright green chopped fresh mint. It was a perfect light lunch. It could even be dinner, served over brown rice, bulgur, or some other filling, toasty grain, for a warming meal to start out roasting season right.

Average user rating 3.5 / 4 Reviews 12 Percentage of reviewers who will make this recipe again 100 %

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11 Ways to Make Mac 'n' Cheese

Glenn Harris, executive chef and co-owner of the Smith, which has two locations in New York City, uses a shallow baking dish to make this showstopper. That means there's maximum surface area for the cheese—a mix of Cheddar, Fontina, Gruyère and Parmigiano-Reggiano—to brown and bubble.

With roasted butternut squash and sage mixed in to the pasta and cheese sauce, plus a sage and bread crumb topping, this casserole from chef Mitch Rosenthal's book, Cooking My Way Back Home, has a delightful balance of textures.

This mac 'n' cheese put the New York restaurant Home on the map. The recipe matches robust extra-sharp Cheddar, Wisconsin Asiago and dry Jack cheeses with smoked paprika for a subtle Spanish flavor.

Photo: Hill Country Barbecue Market

Elizabeth Karmel, executive chef at Hill Country Barbecue Market, which has outposts in New York and Washington, D.C., has figured out a way to marry the flavor of mac 'n' cheese with one of its classic accompaniments: smoked, barbecued meat. Karmel places the casserole in a smoker or a grill prepared with wood chips until it's hot and bubbly, which gives the dish a faint smokiness.

Photo: Benchmarc Restaurants

Who says mac 'n' cheese has to be limited to elbows or shells? Chef and restaurateur Marc Murphy, of Landmarc and Ditch Plains restaurants in New York, started subbing in spaghetti and making a pie-shaped version for his children and their friends as an after-school snack. As it turns out, adults love it too.

Two legendary foods join forces in this dish from chef Brandon McGlamery of Luma on Park restaurant in Orlando, Florida. He makes a smooth Gruyère béchamel and folds in pieces of braised short rib, black pepper and grated horseradish, and then tosses it with rigatoni (which has ridges that are perfect for holding on to the cheese).

Lobster tastes rich and buttery on its own. Pair it with creamy pasta—as chefs Mark Gaier and Clark Frasier do at their Maine and Massachusetts restaurants—and it takes on a decadence we didn't know was possible.

Crystal Cook and Sandy Pollock, aka the Casserole Queens, throw a dash of cayenne pepper into this luscious mac 'n' cheese. Sun-dried tomatoes help absorb some of the heat.

Pasta pillows stuffed with a mixture of beets, goat cheese and Parmesan are tasty enough. But Philadelphia chef and Rustic Italian Food author Marc Vetri takes them a step further: He tosses the "plin," as he calls them, with a butter-tarragon sauce and tops them with more Parmesan. The dish isn't baked like a traditional mac 'n' cheese, but it's no less satisfying.


Giveaway: ‘cook this now’ + carroty mac & cheese

M ELISSA CLARK IS ONE OF US. The prolific cookbook author and “The New York Times” food columnist has a homegrown Dahlia (her young daughter) knows a rutabaga from a turnip (so many people don’t!), and is intrepid in harvesting year-round farm-and-garden gleanings—if not in her own backyard, then in Brooklyn’s Grand Army Plaza Farmers’ Market, where she has been a year-round customer for years, come hell or ice age. With her latest, “Cook This Now,” the hard part will be figuring out which of 120 recipes to start with. Win one of two copies I’ve bought to share—and get her recipe for Carroty Mac and Cheese right now.

As was the case with “In the Kitchen With a Good Appetite,” published last fall, I can be happy just reading a Melissa Clark cookbook, both for flavor ideas and for the charming anecdotes she always layers in—the provenance and food memories associated with each recipe. This one follows the year of outings to her local farmers market, where what’s available dictates what her family will eat each week.

Clark is just so practical—she’s highly expert, of course, but it’s the sensible, can-do voice that I get inspired by. Her recent Thanksgiving countdown column in “The New York Times” is a good example so are the tips under a heading “What Else” that follow each recipe in the new book—like how to turn her Shaved Zucchini and Avocado Salad With Green Goddess Dressing into a dip, for instance (swap sour cream for the buttermilk). There are so many more tips:

Like how she quarters, instead of slices, the apples in her Baked Apples with Fig and Cardamom Crumble to get around the too-mushy applesauce-like glop that’s often beneath the topping of a typical apple crumble. Or how she makes split pea soup seem fresh—which even I, a split pea soup lover, will admit can get a little overly familiar tasting by midwinter. Clark’s suggestion: add ginger and coriander to the ingredient mix.

Or how she—in her role as Dahlia’s mother, seeking to add vegetables to the menu—made delicious room for shaved carrots in a crusty casserole of mac and cheese, which I share here from “Cook This Now.”

Carroty Mac and Cheese

  • If you’re grating your cheddar cheese in the food processor, you don’t have to wash out the machine before grating the carrots. Or vice versa.
  • This is one of those macaroni and cheeses with an eggy custard base that puffs as it cooks, and is cut into squares to serve, like a casserole, as opposed to that gooey, creamy, stove-top béchamel sauce version. I know that some people have strong opinions about proper mac and cheese (I’m an equal opportunist myself), but thought I’d let you know what you’re getting.
  • Feed this dish to the kids as is grown-ups should indulge with a squirt of fiery Sriracha or other hot sauce all over the top.
  • You can vary the cheese to give this rather plain (if tasty) dish more personality. Gruyère, aged Cheddar, pecorino, and aged Gouda will all add a sophisticated allure that will raise it above mere kids’ food.

More Melissa Clark

How to Win a Copy of ‘Cook This Now’


I BOUGHT TWO EXTRA COPIES of Melissa Clark’s “Cook This Now: 120 Easy and Delectable Dishes You Can’t Wait to Make” to share with you. To enter, just comment below by answering the question:

Which is the seasonal produce that you look forward to most–and miss when it’s out of season? I don’t eat asparagus, for instance, except when it’s locally available (mostly from my own garden, April to June), so that would be right up there with flavors I get really excited about when another crop rolls around.

Feeling shy, or just don’t have an answer? Simply comment with “Count me in,” or “I’d like to win” or some such, and you entry will be registered. I’m not too tough to please!

I’ll draw two winners at random after entries close at midnight Wednesday, November 23, using the tool on random [dot] org. (Disclaimer: Books purchased from Amazon links earn me a small commission, which I use to buy books for future giveaways.)


Vegetable Mac & Cheese

30 min prep 4 servings 13 ingredients

Mac and cheese is everyone’s favorite comfort food, especially children. Make this vegetable mac & cheese with whole-wheat pasta and cancer-fighting cruciferous veggies, and it becomes an inexpensive, healthy meal that will help . patients keep their weight up, and keep the kids happy. This recipe does just that. Whether for a single serving or a family meal, you can prep the pasta ahead of time and if you are tired, you can use frozen vegetables instead of fresh to speed up this deliciously healthy treat.


How To Make A Roux For Mac And Cheese 2021

How To Make A Roux For Mac And Cheese. This is called a blonde roux. Somewhere around a tablespoon per every two quarts.

how to make a roux for mac and cheese, Image source from www.pinterest.com

Next, melt butter in a saucepan and stir in flour, salt, and pepper before whisking in milk. For a tasty mac and cheese, you need to salt the daylights out of the water

Homemade Mac Cheese Recipe Mac And Cheese Homemade

Additionally, since my southern style mac and cheese recipe makes an 8 x 8 dish and not an 8 x 13, it is perfect for small gatherings or for people who are watching their portion sizes. Brown roux for perfect gravy, you want a brown roux, so continue cooking the roux a little longer.

Easy macaroni and cheese made without flour or roux. This is called a blonde roux.

Homemade creamy mac and cheese no flour and no roux. Somewhere around a tablespoon per every two quarts.

How to make a roux and cheese sauce recipe food food. Next, melt butter in a saucepan and stir in flour, salt, and pepper before whisking in milk.

This macaroni and cheese dish is made from a cheesy roux. For a tasty mac and cheese, you need to salt the daylights out of the water

The aroma of the garlic studded roux that is the base for. Additionally, since my southern style mac and cheese recipe makes an 8 x 8 dish and not an 8 x 13, it is perfect for small.

How to make creamy macaroni and cheese on the stove. Brown roux for perfect gravy, you want a brown roux, so continue cooking the roux a little longer.

How To Make A Roux For Mac And Cheese 2021

Let the mixture cook for 6 minutes, then add in grated cheese.To make baked macaroni and cheese, first cook the macaroni according to the directions on the package.We will get to that later.A roux (pronounced ‘roo’) is the name given to the cooked mixture of butter and plain flour that thickens and forms the base of various sauces, particularly the white sauce (béchamel).

Add a little butter and milk to the sauce, and this easy side dish is ready in just half an hour.How to make a roux for mac and cheese the key steps to the best mac and cheese:Stir in enough flour to make a roux.Roux mac & cheese cook time:

Melt butter or margarine in a skillet over medium heat.Silky smooth roux (prounced roo) not only thickens sauces, soups, and stews, it also adds a subtle nutty flavor to the dish.it's an essential building block of recipes that range from macaroni and cheese to gumbo.how to make a roux is something every cook should know, and it's easier than you might think.If you are making a white sauce (or béchamel—another fancy word) you would whisk in the milk now.If you happen to have bacon fat or meat drippings on hand (like from making roast beef or steak), those will work, too!

Before you start making the cheese sauce, cook the macaroni according to package directions, drain and then rinse under cold water to stop the cooking process.At this point, the raw taste of flour has been cooked out, and the roux is at its optimal thickening ability.Stir in cheeses, and cook over low heat until cheese is melted and the sauce is a little thick.It's also the base for 3 of the 5 classic french mother sauces.

If you're looking for the ultimate creamy baked mac and cheese recipe, then you've come to the right place!1 do the prep work first:How to make mac and cheese sauce.It’s also an essential ingredient in classic recipes like a classic lasagne, fish pie, moussaka, macaroni cheese and cauliflower cheese.

Put macaroni in large casserole dish, and pour sauce over macaroni.An easy, homemade creamy, mac and cheese made on the stovetop, a simple mac and cheese recipe without flour, and no roux required!To be honest, i didn’t even know that macaroni and cheese even was supposed to be made with a roux until a few years ago.Salt does not make water boil faster — at least not to the degree of cooking just your basic wednesday night dinner.

Salting pasta water is like a giant myth meatball of misleading and untrue scientific facts.Macaroni noodles, milk, butter, and american cheese!1 do the prep work first:Above), so we’re going to skip to step 2.


20 Go-To Recipes You'll Want to Commit to Memory

It could scarcely be any easier. Get a parsnip, a carrot, a leek, and a stick of celery out of the fridge, peel the parsnip and carrot, and finely slice everything. Place them in a Dutch oven and add 4 chicken thighs, a tsp. each of dried thyme, Dijon mustard, and kosher salt, 2 bay leaves, a grinding of black pepper, and half a cup of pearl barley. Add about 5 cups of cold water to submerge everything. Cover, bring to a boil, then turn down the heat and simmer 40 minutes. The chicken should be cooked after 30, but it will be easier to shred by 40. Transfer the thighs to a cutting board, remove the skin, take the meat off the bones, shred it, and drop it back in the pot. If you can, leave the stew uncovered for about 10 minutes before serving. I love this scattered with fresh dill, but parsley is also good.

Photo: Travis Rathbone, Illustration: Shout

Bring both a small and a large pot of salted water to boil. Add 2 cups chopped kale to the small one and cook until tender, about 5 minutes. Drain. In the large pot, cook an 8-ounce package of soba noodles according to package directions, reserving 1 cup cooking water when draining. Toss noodles with 1 Tbsp. oil. In a frying pan, sauté a large handful of chopped walnuts in oil until golden. Add kale, walnuts, small pinches of salt and cayenne pepper, and ¼ cup cooking water to noodles. Stir and add more cooking water, if desired, and lots of grated Parmesan.

—Cara Eisenpress and Phoebe Lapine, authors of In the Small Kitchen (William Morrow)

Photo: Deb Perelman/smittenkitchen.com

I found this recipe in Casa Moro, a cookbook from Moro, one of my favorite London restaurants.

Preheat oven to 425°. Peel and seed a medium butternut squash and chop into 1½ pieces. In a large bowl, combine squash, 1 minced garlic clove, 2 Tbsp. olive oil, and a few pinches of salt. Toss squash to coat, and roast on a baking sheet until just soft, 15 to 20 minutes. Meanwhile, whisk together 1 minced garlic clove, ¼ cup lemon juice, and 3 Tbsp. tahini. Add 2 Tbsp. each water and olive oil and whisk well, adding more salt as needed. Combine the squash, a 15-ounce can chickpeas (rinsed and drained), ¼ chopped red onion, and ¼ cup chopped cilantro or parsley in a mixing bowl. Add the tahini dressing to taste, and mix.

Photo: Travis Rathbone, Illustration: Shout

Preheat oven to 350°. Combine blocks of feta cheese, fresh oregano, thinly sliced red onion, diced tomato, capers, thinly sliced garlic, olive oil, black pepper, and red pepper flakes in whatever proportions seem delicious to you on squares of aluminum foil. (We make one package per person, with about a 2x4 piece of feta.) Seal packets tightly and place on a sheet tray bake 15 minutes. Carefully open packets, transfer mixture to plates, and serve with baguette slices.

When my husband and I were doing the Clean Program (which includes eliminating or reducing sugar, wheat, dairy, booze, caffeine, etc., for three weeks), I discovered this supereasy recipe on the program's Web site. That was only a few months ago, but I've already made it three more times!

Smother some boneless, skinless chicken breasts with hummus (about 1 cup for 4), then top with a squeeze of lemon juice, a sprinkle of balsamic vinegar, chopped fresh rosemary, and lemon slices (optional). Bake at 450° until hummus is golden brown and meat is cooked through, 30 to 35 minutes. Season with salt and black pepper to taste and serve immediately.

—Jenny Bailly, O executive beauty editor

For years this was a secret recipe of mine. You can use half the crab or none at all and it's still delicious.

Bring a pot of salted water to a boil and add a pound of pasta. Heat a couple of Tbsp. of olive oil in a big skillet, stir in 1 pound cooked crab, and warm it through. Pour in ¼ cup white wine. Bring the liquid just to a boil, turn the heat way down, and stir in ½ cup lemon juice and a good amount of salt and pepper. As soon as the pasta is al dente, drain, reserving about ½ cup pasta water. Pour pasta into the skillet and toss in about ¼ cup grated Parmesan and a big handful of chopped parsley. If the pasta needs more liquid, add some of the reserved pasta water. Serve with more Parmesan.

—Frances Mayes, coauthor of The Tuscan Sun Cookbook (Clarkson Potter), out this month, from which this recipe was adapted

My friend Jane Sigal, a cookbook author, suggested this recipe to me as a great way to use up leftover wine. In a pot or large skillet, brown a pound of sliced kielbasa or other sausage in a little olive oil. Remove and set aside. In the same pot, sauté some chopped onion, carrots, and celery in oil. Return the sausage to the pot along with a cup of lentils, a bay leaf, and the equivalent of a bottle of wine (a mix of any leftover wine you might have, red or white, is fine top off with broth or water if you don't have a full bottle). Cover and bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until lentils are soft and liquid is almost all absorbed, about 45 minutes (add more water if necessary). Season to taste with salt and black pepper and serve with rice or crusty bread.

—Michelle Shih, O director of digital editions and lifestyle

Photo: Travis Rathbone, Illustration: Shout

Preheat oven to 400°. In a bowl, combine ½ thinly sliced red onion, 3 Tbsp. sherry vinegar, and a pinch of salt set aside. Toss 6 cups day-old-bread cubes with 4 Tbsp. melted butter and a big pinch each of chopped garlic, fresh thyme leaves, salt, and black pepper. Bake on a rimmed sheet tray, stirring once, until the outsides are crisp, 10 to 15 minutes. Meanwhile, toss 4 cups peeled and finely diced butternut squash and 2 cups halved Brussels sprouts with olive oil and salt roast until lightly caramelized, about 15 minutes. Whisk ½ cup olive oil into reserved red onion mixture. In a large bowl, toss everything together with ½ cup fresh parsley and grated Parmesan, and serve.

Preheat oven to 450°. In a bowl, mix together 8 eggs, ½ cup shredded Cheddar cheese, salt, and black pepper (you could also add sautéed onion or garlic, but it's not necessary). Warm 1 Tbsp. butter in an oven-safe skillet over medium heat, then pour in egg mixture. When eggs start to set, about 1 minute, arrange 2 sliced apples on top. Sprinkle with ½ cup more Cheddar. Transfer to oven and cook until set, about 20 minutes.

I got this recipe from my friend Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan, who I think learned it from another friend!

Slice ½ pound pork (I like to use a combo of pork belly and pork loin) into bite-size pieces. Heat oil in a wok or skillet cook pork with a little salt until browned. Remove the pork, add a little more oil to the pan, and sauté some chopped ginger for a few seconds before adding 3 chopped tomatoes. Season with salt and 1 Tbsp. sugar and cook for a few minutes. Beat 2 eggs and drizzle into the tomato mixture. Return pork to pan and mix. Garnish with chopped scallions and serve with rice.

—Clarissa Cruz, O fashion features editor

Photo: Travis Rathbone, Illustration: Shout

I originally discovered socca—a savory pancake made with chickpea flour—courtesy of chef and blogger David Lebovitz. I serve my version as an appetizer with a zucchini-onion topping.

Combine 2 cups chickpea (garbanzo) flour, 2 cups warm water, 2 Tbsp. olive oil, and 2 tsp. salt. Let rest 2 or more hours. Meanwhile, thinly slice 1 small zucchini and 1 red onion. Sauté briefly in olive oil until lightly browned, then set aside. When ready to cook, turn on broiler. Oil an oven-safe skillet or jelly roll pan and heat in the oven 3 minutes. Remove pan and pour in about 1½ cups batter, until it's about ¼ thick. Top with some of the zucchini and onion, a sprinkling of chopped fresh rosemary, and a few pine nuts (optional). Place socca under broiler until edges are brown, batter is set, and toppings are beginning to crisp, 10 to 12 minutes. Slide out of pan and cut into slices. Repeat with remaining batter and toppings.

—Rachel Mount, O assistant editor

A perfect recipe: a gift from my daughter, Sangeetha.

Combine 1 cup yogurt, ½ tsp. each chopped ginger and garlic, 1 tsp. salt, 1 Tbsp. chili powder, ½ tsp. turmeric, 1 tsp. lemon juice, and a 14.5-ounce can of crushed tomatoes. Marinate a chicken cut into pieces in the mixture for 10 minutes. Finely chop 2 onions and fry in a large skillet with 2 Tbsp. butter and 1 tsp. olive oil. Add chicken and marinade to skillet and cook 10 minutes add 3 Tbsp. cream and simmer 10 minutes. When chicken is cooked through, garnish with cilantro (optional) and serve with rice.


Recipe :: Smokey Carrot Mac and Cheese Bites

I came across a recipe for Carroty Mac and Cheese by Melissa Clark and thought it would make a great addition to the make-ahead kids menu rotation. It’s such a great recipe that I played around with different cheeses and adding some Siracha for heat and have come up with a great retro, comfort food appetizer by cutting the casserole into bite-size squares. This recipe is highly adaptable – make it with whatever cheese you have laying around. I like to use up leftover smaller pieces of smoked gouda, aged goat and others by shredding them and mixing them all together. It creates a complex flavor that is far more sophisticated than the standard mac and cheese. I’ve also made this with gluten-free (brown rice) pasta and didn’t miss the wheat at all.

Bake this recipe in two baking dishes to make the casserole thinner and easier to cut into small squares. Wait for the casserole to cool before cutting it into pieces if you plan to serve it as bite-size appetizers – it will give you cleaner lines like the ones I made pictured above. When making this for a family meal, bake the mac and cheese in one 16″ baking dish for thick, hearty pieces.

This comfort dish gets a sophisticated kick from sriracha.

  • 12oz whole wheat elbow macaroni
  • 2 1/2 cups coarsely grated carrot (about 3 large)
  • 3 cups grated cheese (smoked Gouda, cheddar, pepper jack, etc.)
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • 6oz fat free (0%) Greek yogurt (such as Fage)
  • 1/4 cup whole milk
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 Tbs. Siracha
  • 3/4 teaspoon mustard powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup finely grated Parmesan cheese
  • Preheat oven to 400°F and grease 16-inch rectangular baking pan. Arrange a rack in the top third of the oven.
  • Cook macaroni according to package instructions in a large pot of heavily salted boiling water add carrot 3 minutes before pasta is finished cooking drain well.
  • While pasta is hot, stir in all but 1/2 cup of the cheese and the butter. In a bowl, whisk together the yogurt, milk, eggs, salt, mustard powder, and pepper. Fold mixture into the pasta.
  • Scrape the mixture into the prepared pan. Sprinkle the remaining cheddar and the Parmesan over the top. Bake until the casserole is firm to the touch and golden brown, about 30 minutes.

Use a combination of cheeses, such as smoked gouda, cheddar and jack to enhance the smokey flavor.

Subsitute gluten-free pasta for whole wheat pasta to make this dish gluten-free.

Optional: Omit sriracha and sprinkle with sriracha sea salt after removing from oven, while mac and cheese is still warm.


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