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Alain Ducasse to Send French Food to Space

Alain Ducasse to Send French Food to Space


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NASA hired the French chef to create food for astronauts

Wikimedia/Pymouss

NASA has arranged for Alain Ducasse and Hénaff to prepare and package gourmet French cuisine for astronauts.

The astronauts aboard the International Space Station will have some exciting new food on their plates this summer, as NASA struck a new deal to provide them with some impressive gourmet French cuisine on special occasions.

According to The Local, NASA has awarded a contract to Hénaff, a Breton company that produces tinned paté, to package a specialty French menu created by Michelin-starred chef Alain Ducasse that will then be sent into space.

"The dishes were specially conceived and we were asked to sterilize them and package them in ultra-light aluminum boxes," said Loïc Hénaff, head of the company. Hénaff was chosen as the supplier because it is the only French company that uses conservation and packaging techniques that comply with USDA standards, The Local reports.

The Ducasse meals are intended for special occasions like birthdays and holidays, and will comprise 25 dishes including celeriac purée, Breton lobster, duck breast confit with caper sauce, organic quinoa with seaweed, Menton lemon condiment, and chocolate cake.


Ready for dinner on Mars?

'Martian bread and green tomato jam', 'Spirulina gnocchis' and 'Potato and tomato mille-feuilles' are three delicious recipes that two French companies have created for ESA and future space explorers to Mars and other planets.

The challenge for the chefs was to offer astronauts well-flavoured food, made with only a few ingredients that could be grown on Mars. The result was 11 tasty recipes that could be used on future ESA long-duration space missions. ADF – Alain Ducasse Formation and GEM are the two French companies that produced the recipes, and their mutual experience in creating new products and ‘haute cuisine’ have led to excellent results.

The menus were all based on nine main ingredients that ESA envisions could be grown in greenhouses of future colonies on Mars or other planets. The nine must comprise at least 40% of the final diet, while the remaining (up to) 60% could be additional vegetables, herbs, oil, butter, salt, pepper, sugar and other seasoning brought from Earth.

"We are aiming initially at producing 40% locally for astronauts' food on future long-duration space missions, for example to Mars," says Christophe Lasseur, ESA's biological life-support coordinator responsible for recycling and production of air, water and food for long-term space missions.

"Why 40%? By growing enough plants to cover around 40% of what we eat, we also get 'for free' the oxygen and water needed to live", explains Lasseur.

The nine basic ingredients that Lasseur plans to grow on other planets are: rice, onions, tomatoes, soya, potatoes, lettuce, spinach, wheat and spirulina – all common ingredients except the last. Spirulina is a blue-green algae, a very rich source of nutrition with lots of protein (65% by weight), calcium, carbohydrates, lipids and various vitamins that cover essential nutritional needs for energy in extreme environments.

Today all the food for astronauts in space is brought from Earth, but this will not be possible for longer missions. Although still on the drawing board, ESA has already started research to see what could be grown on other planets - and what a self-supporting eco-system might look like on Mars.

"In addition to being healthy and sufficiently nutritious for survival, good food could potentially provide psychological support for the crew, away from Earth for years," emphasises Lasseur.

ADF chef Armand Arnal, adds: "The main challenge was to create a wide panel of recipes, distinct and full-flavoured, with only nine basic products."

"Moreover, we had absolute restrictions on using salt, but were allowed to add a bit of sugar and fat, ingredients normally essential to the elaboration of a dish and to highlight its flavours."


Dinner on Mars: How to cook martian bread

Image: Space recipe 'Martian bread and green tomato jam': this bread is a perfect combination of the genuine flavour of wheat and the sweet acidity of the tomato. A green tomato jam is presented as a side dish complementing the flavours of the main course. The basic ingredients are wheat and tomatoes, both envisioned to be grown in space, on Mars or other planets. The recipe was developed for ESA, in a research project defining food and nutrition for astronauts on future long-duration space missions. Credits: ADF - Alain Ducasse Formation

The menus were all based on nine main ingredients that ESA envisions could be grown in greenhouses of future colonies on Mars or other planets. The nine must comprise at least 40% of the final diet, while the remaining (up to) 60% could be additional vegetables, herbs, oil, butter, salt, pepper, sugar and other seasoning brought from Earth.

"We are aiming initially at producing 40% locally for astronauts' food on future long-duration space missions, for example to Mars," says Christophe Lasseur, ESA's biological life-support coordinator responsible for recycling and production of air, water and food for long-term space missions.

"Why 40%? By growing enough plants to cover around 40% of what we eat, we also get 'for free' the oxygen and water needed to live", explains Lasseur.

The nine basic ingredients that Lasseur plans to grow on other planets are: rice, onions, tomatoes, soya, potatoes, lettuce, spinach, wheat and spirulina – all common ingredients except the last. Spirulina is a blue-green algae, a very rich source of nutrition with lots of protein (65% by weight), calcium, carbohydrates, lipids and various vitamins that cover essential nutritional needs for energy in extreme environments.

Today all the food for astronauts in space is brought from Earth, but this will not be possible for longer missions. Although still on the drawing board, ESA has already started research to see what could be grown on other planets - and what a self-supporting eco-system might look like on Mars.

"In addition to being healthy and sufficiently nutritious for survival, good food could potentially provide psychological support for the crew, away from Earth for years," emphasises Lasseur.

ADF chef Armand Arnal, adds: "The main challenge was to create a wide panel of recipes, distinct and full-flavoured, with only nine basic products."

"Moreover, we had absolute restrictions on using salt, but were allowed to add a bit of sugar and fat, ingredients normally essential to the elaboration of a dish and to highlight its flavours."


Astronaut to take food from French chefs to space station

Paris: A French astronaut will join Russian and US counterparts blasting off Friday for the International Space Station, taking some Michelin-starred cuisine along to help celebrate in gastronomic style while in Earth's orbit.

French space rookie Thomas Pesquet, 38, will lift off from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan with veteran US and Russian colleagues Peggy Whitson and Oleg Novitsky, for a six-month mission to the ISS.

It will be the former airline pilot's first trip to space -- and to mark the occasion he will bring along a selection of dishes by top French chefs Alain Ducasse and Thierry Marx, including beef tongue with truffled foie gras and duck breast confit.

"We will have food prepared by a Michelin-starred chef at the station. We have food for the big feasts: for Christmas, New Year's and birthdays. We'll have two birthdays, mine and Peggy's," said the Frenchman, who is also taking a saxophone up with him.

Russia is currently the only country carrying out launches to the International Space Station via its workhorse Soyuz rocket that uses the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Pesquet, Novitsky, and Whitson are scheduled to take off at 2:20 am local time Friday (2020 GMT Thursday) and dock at the ISS on November 19th at 2201 GMT.

Pesquet has trained for seven years for his first space flight, but his crewmates both have extensive experience.

Working together

Fifty-six year-old Whitson is going on her third trip and holds the record for time in space for a female. She will assume command of the ISS after March 2017. Novitsky, 45, is going to the station for the second time. Whitson, NASA's most experienced female astronaut, said the fancy French food will certainly be welcome.

"I think the thing that I find the most challenging about space flights is the lack of variety of the food," said the US astronaut, who will command the ISS for the second time after becoming its first female commander back in 2007.

But above all she stressed the international cooperation embodied by the ISS. "I think quite the most important thing about it (ISS), it's the demonstration of what people can do together," she said.

Launch delays

Novitsky agreed. "The ISS is both a home and a place of work. It's also a place for friendship, for showing to the world that we can work together and have good relationships," he said.

The launch of the international trio had been postponed by two days and follows in close footsteps a previous launch in October of Russians Andrei Borisenko and Sergei Ryzhikov and American Shane Kimbrough. That blast-off was pushed back by nearly a month due to technical issues.

Pesquet, who is the first French national to be sent to the ISS by the European Space Agency since 2008, said he still "can't believe" he's going to be en route to the space station soon.

"I need to be seated in the cockpit and feel the vibrations of the launch," he said. Technical mishaps have complicated plans to extend the periods during which the ISS is fully staffed with six astronauts.

The space laboratory has been orbiting Earth at about 28,000 kilometres per hour (17,000 miles per hour) since 1998. Space travel has been one of the few areas of international cooperation between Russia and the West that has not been wrecked by the Ukraine crisis.


Fancy Alain Ducasse dish turns out to be (glorious) mac 'n' cheese

Three decades ago, I was inducted into the Commanderie des Nobles Vins du Jura et du Comte, a bacchanalian confraternity in the Franche-Comte region of France celebrating the local wines and cheeses.

A few of us food writers from the United States took the charter's oath to extol, whenever possible, the noble wines and cheese of the Jura. We received an embossed medal and a parchment with the seal and signatures of the three officers. The hand-lettered parchment hangs in my kitchen to this day.

During our visit to this eastern region of France, we toured wineries and cheesemaking establishments. The dedication to tradition, to quality, to the land, runs through everything. I've been happily cooking with creamy, tangy Comte cheese and sipping the crisp white wines ever since.

A recent trip to Paris rekindled my appreciation for Comte cheese. Like a creamier version of Swiss cheese (without the holes), Comte tastes of rich milk, with a hint of nuts, and is aged to a perfectly tangy flavor. I bought a hunk at Androuet, one of my favorite cheese shops, to eat along with quince paste and a baguette. I enjoyed a 24-month-aged wedge as part of a cheese course.

The piece de resistance came at lunch at chef Alain Ducasse's brasserie, Restaurant Champeaux in the newly renovated Les Halles shopping center.

Easy to translate that the dish would have ham, cheese and black truffle. However, I hadn't a clue as to a coquillette. I ordered the dish anyway.

Turns out, coquillettes are simply miniature elbow-shaped pasta. Ah, this was a fancy mac 'n' cheese! Comfort food at its Frenchiest. And mighty delicious at that. Photos and notes taken, I brought home 3 pounds of coquillettes purchased at a market near my Airbnb. Perfect January fare.

Take no fear, the recipe that follows can be made with nearly any pasta, but using small shapes, along with the tiny dice of ham and cheese, adds to the eating pleasure. For ease, coquillettes can be ordered from Amazon. Ditto for Comte cheese. You can always skip the drizzle of truffle oil and opt for a little fruity olive oil in its place.

The second recipe, with its rich sauce of wine and butter, also takes the sting of out January. Plus, delicate, mildly onion-flavored leeks, add variety to our winter vegetable table. The leeks braise to tenderness in broth and wine, then the pan juices transform into the sauce. A fluffy pile of hard-cooked egg, known in French cuisine as mimosa, tops off this simple dish with a flourish. Serve the leeks as a vegetarian main course or as a side dish to roast chicken.


Ducasse was born in Orthez in southwestern France and was educated on a farm in Castel-Sarrazin. In 1972, when he was sixteen, Ducasse began an apprenticeship at the Pavillon Landais restaurant in Soustons and at the Bordeaux hotel school. After this apprenticeship, he began work at Michel Guérard's restaurant in Eugénie-les-Bains while also working for Gaston Lenôtre during the summer months. In 1977, Ducasse started working as an assistant at Moulin de Mougins under legendary chef Roger Vergé, creator of Cuisine du Soleil, and learned the Provençal cooking methods for which he was later known. [ citation needed ]

In 2012 he held 21 Michelin stars, making him the second ranked chef worldwide in terms of total Michelin stars (Joël Robuchon had 31) and Gordon Ramsay had 17 at the time. [1]

Ducasse's first position as chef came in 1980 when he took over the kitchens at L'amandier in Mougins. One year later, he assumed the position of head chef at La Terrasse in the Hôtel Juana in Juan-les-Pins. In 1984, he was awarded two stars in the Michelin Red Guide. In the same year Ducasse was the only survivor of a Piper Aztec aircraft crash that injured him severely. [2]

In 1986, Ducasse was offered the Chef position at the Hôtel de Paris in Monte Carlo, with management including the hotel's Le Louis XV. After assuring himself that the Hotel's other restaurant operations were operating well, Ducasse continued to run management. [ citation needed ]

In 1988, Ducasse expanded beyond the restaurant industry and opened La Bastide de Moustiers, a twelve-bedroom country inn in Provence [1] and he began attaining financial interests in other Provence hotels. On 12 August 1996, the Alain Ducasse restaurant opened in Le Parc – Sofitel Demeure Hôtels in the 16th arrondissement of Paris. The Red Guide awarded the restaurant three stars just eight months after opening. [ citation needed ]

Ducasse came to the United States and in June 2000 opened the Alain Ducasse restaurant in New York City's Essex hotel at 160 Central Park South, receiving the Red Guide's three stars in December 2005, in the first Red Guide for NYC. Ducasse became the first chef to have 3 restaurants awarded 3 Michelin stars at the same time. [3] That restaurant closed in 2007 when Ducasse chose to open a restaurant in Las Vegas named Mix, which later went on to earn one star in the Michelin Red Guide. In early 2008, Ducasse opened Adour, at the St. Regis Hotel on 16th and K Street in Washington, D.C., and has also opened a more casual Bistro Benoit New York, at 60 West 55th Street. [4]

On 2 July 2011, Alain Ducasse prepared a multi-course gala dinner for the wedding of Prince Albert and Charlene Wittstock. It was the first time Ducasse prepared an official meal for a head of state. He was also in charge of preparing the post-festivities brunch on 3 July, in conjunction with Joël Robuchon. [5]

Ducasse became the first chef to own restaurants carrying three Michelin Stars in three cities. The New York restaurant was dropped from the 2007 Michelin Guide because the restaurant was scheduled to close. Ducasse has become known through his writing and influences. Ducasse is also only one of two chefs to hold 21 Michelin stars throughout his career. [ citation needed ]

He has been special guest in the US and Italian versions of MasterChef. [6] In 2013 he was awarded the Lifetime Achievement on The World's 50 Best Restaurants List. [7]

Ducasse was a French citizen by birth. On 17 June 2008, he became a naturalized citizen of Monaco. [8] He chose Monegasque citizenship in order to take advantage of the principality's tax rates. [9]

Alain Ducasse's restaurants, cooking schools, cookbooks, and consulting activities had revenues of $15.9 million in 2002. [10] Since that time, Ducasse has been expanding his reach. Alain Ducasse has also opened a cooking school for the general public in Paris and another for chefs (ADF), which also works for the European Space Agency to develop astronaut meals to be taken into space. [11] Ducasse has also authored numerous books, with the most famous being Alain Ducasse Culinary Encyclopedia. [ citation needed ]

In 2005, Ducasse opened his first Asian restaurant in Tokyo, Japan. [ citation needed ]

Ducasse's restaurants include:

  • 59 Poincaré (Paris, France)
  • Adour (New York, USA) – Closed 17 November 2012 [12]
  • Restaurant Le Meurice, Alain Ducasse (Paris, France)
  • Alain Ducasse au Plaza Athenee (Paris, France) (London, UK) (Paris, France)
  • Allard (Paris, France)
  • La Trattoria (Monaco)
  • Be (BoulangEpicerie)
  • Beige (Tokyo, Japan) (Paris, France) – bistro
  • Benoit (Tokyo, Japan) – bistro (New York, USA) – bistro – bistro
  • Idam, Museum of Islamic Art, Doha-Qatar gastronomy restaurant
  • La Cour Jardin (Paris, France)
  • Mix (Las Vegas, Nevada)
  • La Terrasse du Parc
  • Le Grill [13]Le Jules Verne (Eiffel Tower, Paris, France) (Monaco)
  • Le Relais du Parc (Paris, France)
  • Le Relais Plaza, Hotel Plaza Athénée (Paris, France)
  • La Bastide de Moustier (Moustier Ste Marie, France)
  • MIA cafe, at Museum of Islamic Art, Doha-Qatar
  • Tamaris (Beirut, Lebanon)
  • Rech by Alain Ducasse (Hong Kong)
  • Rivea (Saint-Tropez, France)
  • Rivea (Las Vegas, USA) Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino
  • Rivea (London, UK) Bulgari Hotel
  • Spoon (Beirut, Carthago, Gstaadt, Mauritius) (Castiglione della Pescaia, Grosseto, Italy)

In 2004 Alain Ducasse opened a restaurant in a resort near Biarritz, in the French Basque Country. However, after several bombing attacks by Irrintzi, an armed Basque nationalist organization, which accused him of being a speculator and of "folkloring" the Basque Country, Ducasse decided to leave the Basque Country. [14]

In 2010 Ducasse opened a miX restaurant at the W Hotel in Vieques, Puerto Rico, [15] but he closed it in 2012. [16]

On 29 November 2017, Melco Resorts announced that Alain Ducasse will open two new restaurants and a bar at the upcoming Morpheus Hotel at City of Dreams, Macau. The restaurants are to be called "Alain Ducasse at Morpheus" and "Voyages by Alain Ducasse". [17] In March 2017, Ducasse opened Rech by Alain Ducass in the Intercontinental Hong Kong. [18]


Alain Ducasse slams plant-based meat products like Beyond Meat

Alain Ducasse is a chef with a deep respect for nature and the rhythms of seasonality, indeed the grand master of French cuisine serves a vegetarian menu at his restaurant on Plaza Athenee in the 8th arrondissement, Paris.

However, the French chef doesn’t necessarily see meat substitute products like Beyond Meat or Impossible Burger being the solution for eating less meat.

Just a year ago, we saw the IPCC (the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) call for a 50% reduction in meat consumption to offset the manmade carbon emissions and deforestation associated with cattle farming.

In that time we’ve seen plant-based meat companies become the hottest IPOs of the year and the success of the synthetic meat seems to know no bounds.

Asked by Business Insider France about the future of food, the Michelin-starred chef said he is certain that in the future, "we will eat less meat but of better quality. We need to produce (meat), in a way that the planet will be less disturbed”, and the farmers will be paid “at a fair price”.

When asked about plant-based meat substitutes like Beyond Meat and their burger, the chef was less than enthusiastic, saying, “we still believe that we need it to look like minced meat, but we do not need that a vegetable hash looks like minced meat, it must look like a vegetable hash, period.”

For Ducasse, changing the way we eat, starts with education. “We need to change the mentality, including within parents’ menu committees for students in schools. There is no need to have animal protein four times a week. Less animal protein, better quality in lesser quantities, less fat, less salt, less sugar, respecting seasonality, fishing seasons, periods of fish reproduction etc.”

Insects are a viable solution for the protein needs of tomorrow according to Ducasse. "Yes, why not? We eat a lot of shrimp," he says.

“Shrimp are crunchy bits of the sea that jump everywhere, they’re like grasshoppers, a grasshopper is something to eat in nature, shrimp it's a crunch of the sea.”

These ideas and more of the chef’s vast knowledge will make up the curriculum in a new school socialising in the culinary and pastry arts to open in September 2020. The third Ducasse school will have the aim of reactivating French cuisine and French know-how.

During a press conference held in Paris on September 26th he recalled his vision of gastronomy as “a universe that cannot be dissociated from the responsibility of feeding the planet, the traceability of food, the respect of natural resources . A savoir-être, a savoir-thinking of cooking, good to eat, good for the planet”.


In Monaco, Alain Ducasse Gives His Favorite Restaurant a Massive Makeover

Today, the restaurant where chef Alain Ducasse won three Michelin stars for the first time, Le Louis XV, reopens with a new look, a new menu and a new name. Even in Monaco, the glittery Mediterranean principality where cosmetic surgery is a casual form of art, it rates as a dazzling makeover.

“It was time,” says Ducasse, admitting he remains more attached to Louis XV than any other in his global empire. “One day I walked into the dining room, and it struck me as looking a little faded and old-fashioned. It needed to be brought into the 21st century.” The complicated mission of creating a new look for the landmarked space, a masterpiece of French Belle Epoque décor located in the Hotel de Paris, was entrusted to Ducasse’s anointed dream team: the Paris-based architects Patrick Jouin and Sanjit Manku, with whom Ducasse recently collaborated on the redesign of his eponymous restaurant in the Plaza Athénée in that city.

Their challenge was to make the 19th-century jewel box of a room, with its wedding-cake moldings and high ceilings, discreetly contemporary but still visually harmonious, since nothing about the space could be structurally altered. “The opulence of the room had become grandmotherly,” says Manku, “so we removed the oil paintings and marble busts at eye level, and rescaled the room with what I think of as a little service temple, or a sort of open metal-and mulberry-wood kiosk in the middle of the room where staff are on view doing a variety of small tasks throughout a meal service. A meal at this restaurant has always been an experience of pageantry, but the pageantry had to be made modern.”

Image

Light became central to the design, and Manku says they used it to “create the feeling of bathing in honey.” Soft, amber-toned rays complement the new centerpiece of the room: a suspended circular chandelier composed of 800 pieces of handmade Murano glass custom-designed by Aristide Najean and inspired by the ones in the Hagia Sofia in Istanbul.

The understated staff uniforms, designed by Marine Halna du Fretay, who was the senior women’s ready-to-wear designer at Hermès from 1989 to 2011, complement the décor with their modesty. Many of her designs for the female employees were produced by Chez Bettina, the Monaco-based firm that creates knitwear for the likes of Chanel and, of course, Hermès.

The new menu at the restaurant reflects the culinary collaboration of Alain Ducasse Franck Cerutti, the creative director of the Hotel de Paris’s restaurants and the chef du cuisine Dominique Lory, who’s run the kitchen of Le Louis XV since 2011. At first glance it reads as more of an evolution than a revolution. Ducasse, 58, has been working to redefine French haute cuisine since he launched the restaurant nearly 30 years ago. So if finding a simple healthy dish like braised spring vegetables and mushrooms on offer at a three-star restaurant doesn’t surprise anymore, that’s because it’s easy to forget French haute cuisine once meant an onslaught of luxury goods like foie gras and lobster before Ducasse’s original gastronomic iconoclasm contributed to a change in the Riviera’s menus.

New dishes at the restaurant include a plate of Mediterranean shellfish on a bed of fresh chickpea purée with local citrus and seaweed. Many are built from a similar spectrum of acidic, sour and bitter tastes, including steamed asparagus with fresh ewe’s milk and grilled Menton lemon, and steamed sea bass with baby beets and local citrus fruits. “Creating a menu is like writing good music,” says Ducasse. “Loud and strong contrasts with soft and gentle. In a world where people zap away from anything they don’t instantly love or understand, gastronomic luxury happens when a dish is so well conceived it wins the time to seduce with subtlety.”

Restaurant Alain Ducasse is located in the Hotel de Paris, Place du Casino, Monaco, 011-3-77-98-0688-64.


Alain Ducasse’s Gougères

First things first! Who doesn’t love cheese? and if you’re allergic to dairy, moment of silence, because these things are fluffy little balls of heaven. They’re easy to make and the best part is you can make them ahead of time and they hold over well at room temperature. Not to mention, you. can. freeze them. Yaaay! you can make them in bulk and when that unexpected guest comes over who raves about how good you cook. You can pull them out of the freezer and throw them in the oven. Instant entertaining snack with the accompaniment of some butter cubes, pepper jelly or even preserves. You’re Welcome!

I was looking for a quick snack to prepare one day for family meal, as mentioned here, and came across these gougeres from the man himself, Alain Ducasse. The world renown French Chef with the esteemed Benoit Restaurant in New York and Le Ralaiz in Paris. There are a few changes I made which didn’t affect the outcome in the least bit. I used Pecorino Romano as opposed to Gruyere, and there’s the addition of white pepper instead of fresh ground.

The man knows food in a way that most will only aspire to. And I assure you that once these come out the oven. You will be reluctant to share.

Ingredients

1/2 cup water
1/2 cup milk
1 stick (4 ounces) unsalted butter, cut into tablespoons
Large pinch of coarse salt
1 cup all-purpose flour
4 large eggs
3 1/2 ounces shredded Pecorino Romano or Cheddar(1 cup), plus more for sprinkling
smidgen white ground pepper
1/8 teaspoon grated nutmeg

Instructions.

  1. Preheat the oven to 400°. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. In a medium saucepan, combine the water, milk, butter and salt and bring to a boil. Add the flour and stir it in with a wooden spoon until a smooth dough forms stir over low heat until it dries out and pulls away from the pan, about 2 minutes. Don’t fret, you’ll know when it’s ready.
  2. Scrape the dough into a large bowl let cool for 1 minute. Beat the eggs into the dough, one at a time, beating thoroughly between each one. Add the cheese and a smidgen each of pepper and nutmeg.
  3. Transfer the dough to a pastry bag fitted with a 1/2-inch round tip and pipe tablespoon-size mounds onto the baking sheets, 2 inches apart, or dollop in spoonfuls for a more rustic shaped gougère. Sprinkle with cheese and bake for 22 minutes, or until puffed and golden brown. Serve hot, or let cool and refrigerate or freeze. Reheat in a 350° oven until hot.

Notes. When making the choux pastry, it is important to be sure that each egg is fully incorporated into the batter before adding the next. Don’t worry if the batter separates and looks curdled at first. Keep beating, and it will come together nicely.

We filled them with a simple chicken salad that I prepared. Only consisting of baked chicken breasts, grape tomatoes, red onion, celery salt, white pepper and mayo.

Freezing Instructions: After baking, allow them to cool. Spread the gougères out on a baking sheet, cover the sheet with plastic wrap and freeze them until they are firm. Then store them in plastic bags for up to 6 months.


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