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Fourth of July Drink: The Trailer Park

Fourth of July Drink: The Trailer Park


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Lemons, ice, and a tallboy make for a refreshing summer drink

There is “America” and then there is ‘Murica. The overly patriotic slang term denotes rednecks, big trucks, bald eagles, and, best of all, beer.

This beer cocktail is the working man’s twist on a summer shandy. Try it this Fourth of July.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 Cup ice
  • 2 lemons, sliced in to wedges
  • 1 tallboy can of PBR, or other American lager

Ultimate Hot Dog Party

You won't need a steamer or a train or a hot air balloon to travel the globe this summer. Just grab some hot dogs and some buns and check out our international toppings guide, below. We'll take you "Around the World in 80 dogs"—from England (cheddar and cider-braised leeks) to Morocco (harissa-caramelized onions and preserved-lemon relish), then to India (red-onion raita and dal) and beyond. There may even be some variations you have not thought of. Hippie dog, anyone? Or how about a tasty pseudo banh mi?

Whichever toppings you choose, you'll want to begin with a great dog. While testing these recipes, the Bon Appétit food editors ate a lot of franks. Their favorites? High up on the list is that supermarket staple, the Hebrew National Beef Frank. Also making the cut: Niman Ranch Uncured All-Beef Fearless Franks, Let's Be Frank Uncured Beef Franks, and Irving's Famous Red-Hot Chicago-Style Hot Dogs.

Now that you've got the dogs and the toppings, it's time to get grilling. Sure, you already know how to cook a good hot dog. But recipe developer Andrew Schloss recommends an optional extra step that yields the ultimate hot dog: one that's crisp and blackened on the outside, moist and plump on the inside. Oddly enough, it all starts on the stovetop. Just place your hot dogs in a large saucepan, add enough cold water to cover, and bring to a boil. Cover the pan, remove it from the heat, and let the dogs stand for five minutes. Then you're ready to grill.

The results, plus a few creative toppings, are pretty transporting. So where to next?


Ultimate Hot Dog Party

You won't need a steamer or a train or a hot air balloon to travel the globe this summer. Just grab some hot dogs and some buns and check out our international toppings guide, below. We'll take you "Around the World in 80 dogs"—from England (cheddar and cider-braised leeks) to Morocco (harissa-caramelized onions and preserved-lemon relish), then to India (red-onion raita and dal) and beyond. There may even be some variations you have not thought of. Hippie dog, anyone? Or how about a tasty pseudo banh mi?

Whichever toppings you choose, you'll want to begin with a great dog. While testing these recipes, the Bon Appétit food editors ate a lot of franks. Their favorites? High up on the list is that supermarket staple, the Hebrew National Beef Frank. Also making the cut: Niman Ranch Uncured All-Beef Fearless Franks, Let's Be Frank Uncured Beef Franks, and Irving's Famous Red-Hot Chicago-Style Hot Dogs.

Now that you've got the dogs and the toppings, it's time to get grilling. Sure, you already know how to cook a good hot dog. But recipe developer Andrew Schloss recommends an optional extra step that yields the ultimate hot dog: one that's crisp and blackened on the outside, moist and plump on the inside. Oddly enough, it all starts on the stovetop. Just place your hot dogs in a large saucepan, add enough cold water to cover, and bring to a boil. Cover the pan, remove it from the heat, and let the dogs stand for five minutes. Then you're ready to grill.

The results, plus a few creative toppings, are pretty transporting. So where to next?


Ultimate Hot Dog Party

You won't need a steamer or a train or a hot air balloon to travel the globe this summer. Just grab some hot dogs and some buns and check out our international toppings guide, below. We'll take you "Around the World in 80 dogs"—from England (cheddar and cider-braised leeks) to Morocco (harissa-caramelized onions and preserved-lemon relish), then to India (red-onion raita and dal) and beyond. There may even be some variations you have not thought of. Hippie dog, anyone? Or how about a tasty pseudo banh mi?

Whichever toppings you choose, you'll want to begin with a great dog. While testing these recipes, the Bon Appétit food editors ate a lot of franks. Their favorites? High up on the list is that supermarket staple, the Hebrew National Beef Frank. Also making the cut: Niman Ranch Uncured All-Beef Fearless Franks, Let's Be Frank Uncured Beef Franks, and Irving's Famous Red-Hot Chicago-Style Hot Dogs.

Now that you've got the dogs and the toppings, it's time to get grilling. Sure, you already know how to cook a good hot dog. But recipe developer Andrew Schloss recommends an optional extra step that yields the ultimate hot dog: one that's crisp and blackened on the outside, moist and plump on the inside. Oddly enough, it all starts on the stovetop. Just place your hot dogs in a large saucepan, add enough cold water to cover, and bring to a boil. Cover the pan, remove it from the heat, and let the dogs stand for five minutes. Then you're ready to grill.

The results, plus a few creative toppings, are pretty transporting. So where to next?


Ultimate Hot Dog Party

You won't need a steamer or a train or a hot air balloon to travel the globe this summer. Just grab some hot dogs and some buns and check out our international toppings guide, below. We'll take you "Around the World in 80 dogs"—from England (cheddar and cider-braised leeks) to Morocco (harissa-caramelized onions and preserved-lemon relish), then to India (red-onion raita and dal) and beyond. There may even be some variations you have not thought of. Hippie dog, anyone? Or how about a tasty pseudo banh mi?

Whichever toppings you choose, you'll want to begin with a great dog. While testing these recipes, the Bon Appétit food editors ate a lot of franks. Their favorites? High up on the list is that supermarket staple, the Hebrew National Beef Frank. Also making the cut: Niman Ranch Uncured All-Beef Fearless Franks, Let's Be Frank Uncured Beef Franks, and Irving's Famous Red-Hot Chicago-Style Hot Dogs.

Now that you've got the dogs and the toppings, it's time to get grilling. Sure, you already know how to cook a good hot dog. But recipe developer Andrew Schloss recommends an optional extra step that yields the ultimate hot dog: one that's crisp and blackened on the outside, moist and plump on the inside. Oddly enough, it all starts on the stovetop. Just place your hot dogs in a large saucepan, add enough cold water to cover, and bring to a boil. Cover the pan, remove it from the heat, and let the dogs stand for five minutes. Then you're ready to grill.

The results, plus a few creative toppings, are pretty transporting. So where to next?


Ultimate Hot Dog Party

You won't need a steamer or a train or a hot air balloon to travel the globe this summer. Just grab some hot dogs and some buns and check out our international toppings guide, below. We'll take you "Around the World in 80 dogs"—from England (cheddar and cider-braised leeks) to Morocco (harissa-caramelized onions and preserved-lemon relish), then to India (red-onion raita and dal) and beyond. There may even be some variations you have not thought of. Hippie dog, anyone? Or how about a tasty pseudo banh mi?

Whichever toppings you choose, you'll want to begin with a great dog. While testing these recipes, the Bon Appétit food editors ate a lot of franks. Their favorites? High up on the list is that supermarket staple, the Hebrew National Beef Frank. Also making the cut: Niman Ranch Uncured All-Beef Fearless Franks, Let's Be Frank Uncured Beef Franks, and Irving's Famous Red-Hot Chicago-Style Hot Dogs.

Now that you've got the dogs and the toppings, it's time to get grilling. Sure, you already know how to cook a good hot dog. But recipe developer Andrew Schloss recommends an optional extra step that yields the ultimate hot dog: one that's crisp and blackened on the outside, moist and plump on the inside. Oddly enough, it all starts on the stovetop. Just place your hot dogs in a large saucepan, add enough cold water to cover, and bring to a boil. Cover the pan, remove it from the heat, and let the dogs stand for five minutes. Then you're ready to grill.

The results, plus a few creative toppings, are pretty transporting. So where to next?


Ultimate Hot Dog Party

You won't need a steamer or a train or a hot air balloon to travel the globe this summer. Just grab some hot dogs and some buns and check out our international toppings guide, below. We'll take you "Around the World in 80 dogs"—from England (cheddar and cider-braised leeks) to Morocco (harissa-caramelized onions and preserved-lemon relish), then to India (red-onion raita and dal) and beyond. There may even be some variations you have not thought of. Hippie dog, anyone? Or how about a tasty pseudo banh mi?

Whichever toppings you choose, you'll want to begin with a great dog. While testing these recipes, the Bon Appétit food editors ate a lot of franks. Their favorites? High up on the list is that supermarket staple, the Hebrew National Beef Frank. Also making the cut: Niman Ranch Uncured All-Beef Fearless Franks, Let's Be Frank Uncured Beef Franks, and Irving's Famous Red-Hot Chicago-Style Hot Dogs.

Now that you've got the dogs and the toppings, it's time to get grilling. Sure, you already know how to cook a good hot dog. But recipe developer Andrew Schloss recommends an optional extra step that yields the ultimate hot dog: one that's crisp and blackened on the outside, moist and plump on the inside. Oddly enough, it all starts on the stovetop. Just place your hot dogs in a large saucepan, add enough cold water to cover, and bring to a boil. Cover the pan, remove it from the heat, and let the dogs stand for five minutes. Then you're ready to grill.

The results, plus a few creative toppings, are pretty transporting. So where to next?


Ultimate Hot Dog Party

You won't need a steamer or a train or a hot air balloon to travel the globe this summer. Just grab some hot dogs and some buns and check out our international toppings guide, below. We'll take you "Around the World in 80 dogs"—from England (cheddar and cider-braised leeks) to Morocco (harissa-caramelized onions and preserved-lemon relish), then to India (red-onion raita and dal) and beyond. There may even be some variations you have not thought of. Hippie dog, anyone? Or how about a tasty pseudo banh mi?

Whichever toppings you choose, you'll want to begin with a great dog. While testing these recipes, the Bon Appétit food editors ate a lot of franks. Their favorites? High up on the list is that supermarket staple, the Hebrew National Beef Frank. Also making the cut: Niman Ranch Uncured All-Beef Fearless Franks, Let's Be Frank Uncured Beef Franks, and Irving's Famous Red-Hot Chicago-Style Hot Dogs.

Now that you've got the dogs and the toppings, it's time to get grilling. Sure, you already know how to cook a good hot dog. But recipe developer Andrew Schloss recommends an optional extra step that yields the ultimate hot dog: one that's crisp and blackened on the outside, moist and plump on the inside. Oddly enough, it all starts on the stovetop. Just place your hot dogs in a large saucepan, add enough cold water to cover, and bring to a boil. Cover the pan, remove it from the heat, and let the dogs stand for five minutes. Then you're ready to grill.

The results, plus a few creative toppings, are pretty transporting. So where to next?


Ultimate Hot Dog Party

You won't need a steamer or a train or a hot air balloon to travel the globe this summer. Just grab some hot dogs and some buns and check out our international toppings guide, below. We'll take you "Around the World in 80 dogs"—from England (cheddar and cider-braised leeks) to Morocco (harissa-caramelized onions and preserved-lemon relish), then to India (red-onion raita and dal) and beyond. There may even be some variations you have not thought of. Hippie dog, anyone? Or how about a tasty pseudo banh mi?

Whichever toppings you choose, you'll want to begin with a great dog. While testing these recipes, the Bon Appétit food editors ate a lot of franks. Their favorites? High up on the list is that supermarket staple, the Hebrew National Beef Frank. Also making the cut: Niman Ranch Uncured All-Beef Fearless Franks, Let's Be Frank Uncured Beef Franks, and Irving's Famous Red-Hot Chicago-Style Hot Dogs.

Now that you've got the dogs and the toppings, it's time to get grilling. Sure, you already know how to cook a good hot dog. But recipe developer Andrew Schloss recommends an optional extra step that yields the ultimate hot dog: one that's crisp and blackened on the outside, moist and plump on the inside. Oddly enough, it all starts on the stovetop. Just place your hot dogs in a large saucepan, add enough cold water to cover, and bring to a boil. Cover the pan, remove it from the heat, and let the dogs stand for five minutes. Then you're ready to grill.

The results, plus a few creative toppings, are pretty transporting. So where to next?


Ultimate Hot Dog Party

You won't need a steamer or a train or a hot air balloon to travel the globe this summer. Just grab some hot dogs and some buns and check out our international toppings guide, below. We'll take you "Around the World in 80 dogs"—from England (cheddar and cider-braised leeks) to Morocco (harissa-caramelized onions and preserved-lemon relish), then to India (red-onion raita and dal) and beyond. There may even be some variations you have not thought of. Hippie dog, anyone? Or how about a tasty pseudo banh mi?

Whichever toppings you choose, you'll want to begin with a great dog. While testing these recipes, the Bon Appétit food editors ate a lot of franks. Their favorites? High up on the list is that supermarket staple, the Hebrew National Beef Frank. Also making the cut: Niman Ranch Uncured All-Beef Fearless Franks, Let's Be Frank Uncured Beef Franks, and Irving's Famous Red-Hot Chicago-Style Hot Dogs.

Now that you've got the dogs and the toppings, it's time to get grilling. Sure, you already know how to cook a good hot dog. But recipe developer Andrew Schloss recommends an optional extra step that yields the ultimate hot dog: one that's crisp and blackened on the outside, moist and plump on the inside. Oddly enough, it all starts on the stovetop. Just place your hot dogs in a large saucepan, add enough cold water to cover, and bring to a boil. Cover the pan, remove it from the heat, and let the dogs stand for five minutes. Then you're ready to grill.

The results, plus a few creative toppings, are pretty transporting. So where to next?


Ultimate Hot Dog Party

You won't need a steamer or a train or a hot air balloon to travel the globe this summer. Just grab some hot dogs and some buns and check out our international toppings guide, below. We'll take you "Around the World in 80 dogs"—from England (cheddar and cider-braised leeks) to Morocco (harissa-caramelized onions and preserved-lemon relish), then to India (red-onion raita and dal) and beyond. There may even be some variations you have not thought of. Hippie dog, anyone? Or how about a tasty pseudo banh mi?

Whichever toppings you choose, you'll want to begin with a great dog. While testing these recipes, the Bon Appétit food editors ate a lot of franks. Their favorites? High up on the list is that supermarket staple, the Hebrew National Beef Frank. Also making the cut: Niman Ranch Uncured All-Beef Fearless Franks, Let's Be Frank Uncured Beef Franks, and Irving's Famous Red-Hot Chicago-Style Hot Dogs.

Now that you've got the dogs and the toppings, it's time to get grilling. Sure, you already know how to cook a good hot dog. But recipe developer Andrew Schloss recommends an optional extra step that yields the ultimate hot dog: one that's crisp and blackened on the outside, moist and plump on the inside. Oddly enough, it all starts on the stovetop. Just place your hot dogs in a large saucepan, add enough cold water to cover, and bring to a boil. Cover the pan, remove it from the heat, and let the dogs stand for five minutes. Then you're ready to grill.

The results, plus a few creative toppings, are pretty transporting. So where to next?



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