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Kroger Recalls Caramel Apples After Listeria Study

Kroger Recalls Caramel Apples After Listeria Study


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Kroger has recalled unrefrigerated caramel apples after new listeria research

Following the publication of a study about the risk of listeria in connection with caramel apples — the juice from which was found to provide a growth environment for the foodborne bacteria — Kroger has announced the decision to recall its unrefrigerated caramel apples from store shelves.

No illnesses have been reported in connection with the apples, but a recent study published by the American Society of Microbiology found that when punctured by a stick, unrefrigerated caramel apples posed a particular listeria risk. The product has been pulled from store shelves effective immediately.

“After reviewing the study, we have decided to voluntarily withdraw unrefrigerated caramel apples from our stores,” said Dr. Payton Pruett, Kroger’s vice president of food safety. “While we believe the potential health risk is minimal, we are acting out of an abundance of caution on behalf of our customers.”

Last December, a multistate listeria outbreak killed five people and sickened at least 28 others.


Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

With apple-harvesting season and Halloween, October is peak caramel apple season. This week, a study published in the open-access journal mBio showed how an apple that’s already contaminated with Listeria can incubate even more bacteria after it’s covered with caramel and sits on a shelf for a few weeks. The juice exiting the apple when the fruit is impaled on a stick brings the bacteria out of the fruit, where it grows between the apple skin and the candy.

Kroger cites this study in its announcement to ditch all of their current inventory of caramel apples: last year’s outbreak killed seven people and caused one miscarriage, and no one wants to see that happen again.

“While we believe the potential health risk is minimal, we are acting out of an abundance of caution on behalf of our customers,” the company’s VP of food safety said in a statement. The company won’t rule out selling caramel apples again in the future, but only after manufacturers find a safer method to mass-produce the treats.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

With apple-harvesting season and Halloween, October is peak caramel apple season. This week, a study published in the open-access journal mBio showed how an apple that’s already contaminated with Listeria can incubate even more bacteria after it’s covered with caramel and sits on a shelf for a few weeks. The juice exiting the apple when the fruit is impaled on a stick brings the bacteria out of the fruit, where it grows between the apple skin and the candy.

Kroger cites this study in its announcement to ditch all of their current inventory of caramel apples: last year’s outbreak killed seven people and caused one miscarriage, and no one wants to see that happen again.

“While we believe the potential health risk is minimal, we are acting out of an abundance of caution on behalf of our customers,” the company’s VP of food safety said in a statement. The company won’t rule out selling caramel apples again in the future, but only after manufacturers find a safer method to mass-produce the treats.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

With apple-harvesting season and Halloween, October is peak caramel apple season. This week, a study published in the open-access journal mBio showed how an apple that’s already contaminated with Listeria can incubate even more bacteria after it’s covered with caramel and sits on a shelf for a few weeks. The juice exiting the apple when the fruit is impaled on a stick brings the bacteria out of the fruit, where it grows between the apple skin and the candy.

Kroger cites this study in its announcement to ditch all of their current inventory of caramel apples: last year’s outbreak killed seven people and caused one miscarriage, and no one wants to see that happen again.

“While we believe the potential health risk is minimal, we are acting out of an abundance of caution on behalf of our customers,” the company’s VP of food safety said in a statement. The company won’t rule out selling caramel apples again in the future, but only after manufacturers find a safer method to mass-produce the treats.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

With apple-harvesting season and Halloween, October is peak caramel apple season. This week, a study published in the open-access journal mBio showed how an apple that’s already contaminated with Listeria can incubate even more bacteria after it’s covered with caramel and sits on a shelf for a few weeks. The juice exiting the apple when the fruit is impaled on a stick brings the bacteria out of the fruit, where it grows between the apple skin and the candy.

Kroger cites this study in its announcement to ditch all of their current inventory of caramel apples: last year’s outbreak killed seven people and caused one miscarriage, and no one wants to see that happen again.

“While we believe the potential health risk is minimal, we are acting out of an abundance of caution on behalf of our customers,” the company’s VP of food safety said in a statement. The company won’t rule out selling caramel apples again in the future, but only after manufacturers find a safer method to mass-produce the treats.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

With apple-harvesting season and Halloween, October is peak caramel apple season. This week, a study published in the open-access journal mBio showed how an apple that’s already contaminated with Listeria can incubate even more bacteria after it’s covered with caramel and sits on a shelf for a few weeks. The juice exiting the apple when the fruit is impaled on a stick brings the bacteria out of the fruit, where it grows between the apple skin and the candy.

Kroger cites this study in its announcement to ditch all of their current inventory of caramel apples: last year’s outbreak killed seven people and caused one miscarriage, and no one wants to see that happen again.

“While we believe the potential health risk is minimal, we are acting out of an abundance of caution on behalf of our customers,” the company’s VP of food safety said in a statement. The company won’t rule out selling caramel apples again in the future, but only after manufacturers find a safer method to mass-produce the treats.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

With apple-harvesting season and Halloween, October is peak caramel apple season. This week, a study published in the open-access journal mBio showed how an apple that’s already contaminated with Listeria can incubate even more bacteria after it’s covered with caramel and sits on a shelf for a few weeks. The juice exiting the apple when the fruit is impaled on a stick brings the bacteria out of the fruit, where it grows between the apple skin and the candy.

Kroger cites this study in its announcement to ditch all of their current inventory of caramel apples: last year’s outbreak killed seven people and caused one miscarriage, and no one wants to see that happen again.

“While we believe the potential health risk is minimal, we are acting out of an abundance of caution on behalf of our customers,” the company’s VP of food safety said in a statement. The company won’t rule out selling caramel apples again in the future, but only after manufacturers find a safer method to mass-produce the treats.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

With apple-harvesting season and Halloween, October is peak caramel apple season. This week, a study published in the open-access journal mBio showed how an apple that’s already contaminated with Listeria can incubate even more bacteria after it’s covered with caramel and sits on a shelf for a few weeks. The juice exiting the apple when the fruit is impaled on a stick brings the bacteria out of the fruit, where it grows between the apple skin and the candy.

Kroger cites this study in its announcement to ditch all of their current inventory of caramel apples: last year’s outbreak killed seven people and caused one miscarriage, and no one wants to see that happen again.

“While we believe the potential health risk is minimal, we are acting out of an abundance of caution on behalf of our customers,” the company’s VP of food safety said in a statement. The company won’t rule out selling caramel apples again in the future, but only after manufacturers find a safer method to mass-produce the treats.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

With apple-harvesting season and Halloween, October is peak caramel apple season. This week, a study published in the open-access journal mBio showed how an apple that’s already contaminated with Listeria can incubate even more bacteria after it’s covered with caramel and sits on a shelf for a few weeks. The juice exiting the apple when the fruit is impaled on a stick brings the bacteria out of the fruit, where it grows between the apple skin and the candy.

Kroger cites this study in its announcement to ditch all of their current inventory of caramel apples: last year’s outbreak killed seven people and caused one miscarriage, and no one wants to see that happen again.

“While we believe the potential health risk is minimal, we are acting out of an abundance of caution on behalf of our customers,” the company’s VP of food safety said in a statement. The company won’t rule out selling caramel apples again in the future, but only after manufacturers find a safer method to mass-produce the treats.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

With apple-harvesting season and Halloween, October is peak caramel apple season. This week, a study published in the open-access journal mBio showed how an apple that’s already contaminated with Listeria can incubate even more bacteria after it’s covered with caramel and sits on a shelf for a few weeks. The juice exiting the apple when the fruit is impaled on a stick brings the bacteria out of the fruit, where it grows between the apple skin and the candy.

Kroger cites this study in its announcement to ditch all of their current inventory of caramel apples: last year’s outbreak killed seven people and caused one miscarriage, and no one wants to see that happen again.

“While we believe the potential health risk is minimal, we are acting out of an abundance of caution on behalf of our customers,” the company’s VP of food safety said in a statement. The company won’t rule out selling caramel apples again in the future, but only after manufacturers find a safer method to mass-produce the treats.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Kroger Gets Rid Of Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples On Sticks Just To Be Sure

With apple-harvesting season and Halloween, October is peak caramel apple season. This week, a study published in the open-access journal mBio showed how an apple that’s already contaminated with Listeria can incubate even more bacteria after it’s covered with caramel and sits on a shelf for a few weeks. The juice exiting the apple when the fruit is impaled on a stick brings the bacteria out of the fruit, where it grows between the apple skin and the candy.

Kroger cites this study in its announcement to ditch all of their current inventory of caramel apples: last year’s outbreak killed seven people and caused one miscarriage, and no one wants to see that happen again.

“While we believe the potential health risk is minimal, we are acting out of an abundance of caution on behalf of our customers,” the company’s VP of food safety said in a statement. The company won’t rule out selling caramel apples again in the future, but only after manufacturers find a safer method to mass-produce the treats.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


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