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Grilled mussels recipe

Grilled mussels recipe


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  • Dish type
  • Starters
  • Seafood starters

Steamed mussels are delicious, but it's nice to do something different once in awhile. Perfect with a glass of chilled white.

6 people made this

IngredientsServes: 2

  • 12 large mussels
  • 250ml wine
  • 4 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1 bunch fresh parsley, chopped
  • black pepper to taste
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:5min ›Ready in:15min

  1. Add mussels and wine to a hot pan over high heat. Simmer for a few minutes, until mussels just open up. Discard any mussels that do not open.
  2. Remove and discard the top shell, leaving the bottom shell to which the mussel is attached.
  3. Combine mayonnaise, parsley, garlic, pepper and lemon juice. Mix thoroughly.
  4. Carefully snip the muscle that attaches the mussel to the shell (this will make it easier to eat).
  5. Arrange the mussels on a baking tray. Brush mussels with the mayo mixture.
  6. Place under the oven's grill for about 5 minutes, till bubbly. Serve hot.

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  • 1 Pound fresh mussels
  • Lemon wedges
  • Olive oil
  • 1/4 Cup butter
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled and thinly sliced
  • Fresh parsley, for garnish
  • Crusty bread, to serve

Pre-heat your grill to medium-high.

Rinse your mussels. Discard any that are already open.

Brush the cut sides of the lemon with olive oil.

Scatter the mussels directly on the grill along with the lemons, cut-side down. Close the lid of the grill and cook for 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat the butter and garlic in a small saucepan until the butter melts.

Remove the mussels from the grill. They should all be open — discard any that are closed. Transfer to a bowl, drizzle with the garlic butter, and toss to coat.

Transfer to shallow bowls, scatter with parsley, and serve with crusty bread and grilled lemon.


Grilled Mussels in Feta Cheese & Tomato

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New Zealand is blessed with awesome seafood selections, yummy fish and chips, bluff oysters that’s to-die-for (accompanied by a glass of Oyster Bay Chardonnay) and heaps of cheap green lipped mussels. Those mussels are so fresh, extremely large in size that some are almost as big as the palm of my hand with big fat juicy meat inside. The best way to cook them is in white wine to keep them stay juicy and sweet.

This recipe is adopted from a greek-style mussel recipe. Best served for brunch – but I’ll have them as appetizer for dinner tonight.


How to Grill Mussels

When the weather is cold, mussels steamed in the pan with white wine and parsley makes a wonderful meal, served with warm garlic bread. Then maybe follow them up with some mulled wine or hot apple cider. This is why everyone should know how to cook mussels. When the weather turns warm, such a dish might not offer the same appeal but that’s when the barbecue comes into play and grilling season is in full swing.

In the following recipe we are taking live mussels and cooking them in foil packets. They are served with a butter, parsley and white wine sauce, along with some bread. This makes a lovely appetizer for 4 or an entrée for 2. If you’re serving it as an entrée then consider fries on the side or baked potatoes.

How to Store Mussels Safely

When learning how to cook mussels, you should know that live mussels may be stored in the refrigerator for a couple of days. Before you cook them, tap any shells which are open. Alive ones will close their shells right away. Dead ones won’t so discard any that don’t close when you give them a sharp tap. Soak them in salted water for a few minutes too. This encourages them to spit out any grit.

Changes You Can Make to the Recipe

If you want to tweak the recipe, you can swap the parsley for green onion or add some hot sauce into the dipping sauce to spice it up a bit. This recipe can also be used with clams or other kinds of seafood. The dry heat from the grill will cook the seafood well and the aluminum foil will protect them from scorching.

This makes a really good appetizer before a meat main dish, so perhaps as soon as you’ve served these, pop some steaks or chicken wings on the grill, so people can have those as soon as they’re done with the mussels.


Preparation

  • Prepare a gas grill or charcoal grill to medium high (400°F to 475°F). (If using charcoal, the coals should be covered with white ash, and you should be able to hold your hand just above the grate for no more than 2 to 3 seconds.)
  • Combine the roasted red pepper, bread, egg yolk, garlic, lemon juice, saffron, and cayenne pepper in a food processor. Pulse until the mixture is smooth. With the motor running, slowly pour in the canola oil in a slow, steady stream until the mixture thickens. Transfer the rouille to a bowl. Whisk in the extra-virgin olive oil until totally incorporated and season to taste with salt. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until ready to serve.
  • Place the mussels on the cooking grate, close the lid, and cook until the mussels have opened, about 5 minutes. Transfer the mussels to a large bowl, lifting them off the grill with tongs to keep as much liquid in the shells as possible. Discard any mussels that do not open. Serve with the rouille for dipping.

To prep the mussels for grilling, you’ll need to remove their beards. Don’t try to yank them straight out—wiggle them from side to side and they’ll release more easily.


Smoky, Juicy Mussels and Clams Pop on the Grill

By this late in the season, all the usual suspects have probably done time on your grill: the requisite burgers and hot dogs steaks, chops and loins vegetables of many colors. Maybe even a slab of tofu or fillet of fish.

But when was the last time you grilled mussels and clams?

If the answer is never, and you love the brininess of shellfish, read on.

Although they don’t take on a char in the way of a burger, mollusks absorb smoky flavor when grilled over a fire, their naturally sweet juices condensing and intensifying in the heat.

There are two main methods for grilling them. The easiest is to throw the closed mussels and clams (and oysters if you like) directly onto the grill grate, then pull them off as they pop open. This is about as simple as cooking gets, though it comes at a cost: Most of those saline juices will spill onto the coals.

This recipe requires slightly more effort, but with a big payoff. First, you’ll need a disposable roasting pan, the kind you may roast a turkey in at Thanksgiving. You’ll also need some heavy-duty foil and some patience. That’s perhaps the hardest part: waiting for your dinner.

Start with the clams with their thick shells, they take longer to cook than the mussels. Add garlic, some chile, a drizzle of oil, a splash of wine. After a while, add your mussels to the pan, then start to pull the shellfish off the grill as they open. Don’t worry if a few specimens take a little longer. As long as they open, they are safe to eat. (And, of course, discard any that refuse to budge.)

The recipe up until this point is a lot like what you’d do in a pot on the stove. But you wouldn’t get the smokiness.

Hardwood charcoal is your best bet in terms of the smoke factor, but even a gas grill will work. And if you’re comfortable with using wood chips, that’s fine.

After cooking all your shellfish, you’ll be left with a pan of garlicky, salty juices. Pour this over the mussels and clams. You could serve this as is, but I like to add a sort of deconstructed gremolata with mint for freshness, lemon zest for verve, almonds for crunch, plus a little more garlic just because.

Even if you skip the garnish, make sure to have a chilled bottle of rosé and a crusty loaf of bread nearby. Forks are entirely optional. Your fingers, an empty mussel shell and a chunk of bread for sopping up the juices are all you really need.

And to Drink .

With these grilled clams and mussels, you want cold white wine, of course, and plenty of it. The choices are many, as long as the wines are crisp, with lively acidity, and not weighed down by the flavors of oak. Chablis is a wonderful place to start, but it’s only the beginning. Sancerre from the eastern part of the Loire Valley’s wine-production area will do nicely, but good Muscadet from the western end may be even better. Smoky, saline Manzanilla sherry is a natural, as are a profusion of Italian whites, whether Ligurian vermentino, Campanian fiano or Etna bianco from Sicily. You may even consider moving beyond wine. Belgian-style wheat beers go beautifully with simply prepared shellfish, as would gose, a rare Germany wheat beer flavored with salt and coriander. ERIC ASIMOV


Grilled Mussels with Garlic Butter

Scrub mussels in shells under cold running water. If present, remove beards. In an 8-quart Dutch oven combine 4 quarts cold water and 1/3 cup salt add mussels. Soak for 15 minutes drain and rinse. Discard water. Repeat soaking, draining, and rinsing twice.

For sauce, in a small saucepan melt butter over medium heat. Add garlic cook for 1 minute. Add wine bring just to a simmer. Remove from heat stir in parsley.

Tear off a 36x18-inch piece of heavy foil fold foil in half to make an 18-inch square. Place the mussels in the center of the foil. Bring up opposite edges of foil and seal with a double fold. Fold remaining edges together to completely enclose mussels, leaving space for steam to build.

Place foil packet on the grill rack directly over medium-high heat grill for 8 to 10 minutes or until shells open. Transfer mussels (discard any that do not open) and any liquid to a serving bowl.

Transfer the sauce to small bowls for dipping. Serve mussels with sauce and, if desired, bread. Makes 4 appetizer servings.


Grilled Paella

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Paella, the classic grilled rice dish from Spain, is perfect for a barbecue because everything cooks together in one pan and absorbs the smoky flavor from the fire. The key to this dish is the crusty caramelized layer of rice, called socarrat, that forms on the bottom of the pan. While the combination of ingredients ranges from the traditional rabbit and snails to vegetables and seafood, this version, known as paella mixta, contains seafood, Spanish chorizo, and chicken. For more Spanish flair, sip on glasses of sangría while the paella’s on the grill.

Special equipment: This dish is named after the two-handled pan it’s cooked in. You’ll need a 15-inch paella pan because its wide surface area ensures that the rice cooks in a thin, even layer.

What to buy: Spanish chorizo (not to be confused with its Mexican counterpart) is a dried, smoked, ready-to-eat pork sausage. It can be mild or spicy, and is found at gourmet markets or online. If you can’t find Spanish chorizo, you can sub in some andouille sausage.

Paella rice, sometimes labeled bomba or Valencia, is a white short-grain rice prized for its ability to stay firm when cooked. It can be found in gourmet grocery stores. If you can’t find paella rice, Arborio rice can be substituted, although the texture will be slightly softer when cooked.

Game plan: If making paella on the grill is not an option, try this recipe for a stovetop, oven-finished paella.


Scrub mussels in shells under cold running water. If present, remove beards.

In an 8-quart Dutch oven combine cold water and salt. Add mussels. Soak for 15 minutes, then drain and rinse. Discard water. Repeat soaking, draining, and rinsing twice.

For sauce, in a small saucepan melt butter over medium heat. Add garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add wine and bring just to a simmer. Remove from heat and stir in parsley.

Tear off a 36- x 18-inch piece of heavy foil. Fold foil in half to make an 18-inch square. Place the mussels in the center of the foil. Bring up opposite edges of foil and seal with a double fold. Fold remaining edges together to completely enclose mussels, leaving space for steam to build.

Place foil packet on the grill rack directly over medium-high heat. Grill for 8 to 10 minutes or until shells open. Transfer mussels (discard any that do not open) and any liquid to a serving bowl.

Transfer the sauce to small bowls for dipping. Serve mussels with sauce and, if desired, bread.

Tip: You can store live mussels in the refrigerator, covered with a moist cloth, for up to 3 days. Before you cook them, tap any open shells. If the mussels are alive, the shells will close. Discard any that aren't alive.


Grilled Mussels with White Wine, Fried Garlic and Herbs

Mussels were a family favorite at my house when I was growing up.

This post may contain affiliate links.

My mom would often prepare them steamed with white wine, garlic and fresh aromatics, or simmered with tomato sauce and spooned over spaghetti. Either way, toasted bread was always served to sop up all the delicious seafood-infused sauce. This recipe, inspired by my mom’s steamed mussels, comes to you today in partnership with Noble Vines, a California label founded in 2006 by the Indelicato family a fourth-generation family owned winery that’s been making wine in California since 1924.

Given that it’s summer right now and I’ve been grilling and smoking everything, I decided to prepare these mussels over a hot charcoal fire. You start by heating up a cast iron skillet directly on the grill grate. Garlic and red chile flakes are then sizzled in olive oil until golden and aromatic. The mussels join the skillet along with dry white wine like Noble Vines 242 Sauvignon Blanc crisp with notes of white peach, citrus and lemongrass. You then cover the grill to let the mussels steam while they soak up flavors of smoke and fried garlic. The dish is finished with fresh parsley, mint and lemon zest.

These Grilled Mussels are a perfect summer meal. The deep savoriness of the golden garlic is balanced by the fresh herbs, lemon zest and acidity from the white wine. A natural wine pairing for these mussels would be Noble Vines 242 Sauvignon Blanc. It’s refreshing on a warm evening, and echoes the flavors infused into the dish. Be sure to serve plenty of grilled bread on the side for dipping. Continue reading for the recipe plus more on Noble Vines!

Noble Vines sent me a selection of their varietals to help me get to know the brand better, and I’ll have to say I really enjoyed the 667 Pinot Noir, 515 Rosé and of course, the 242 Sauvignon Blanc. I also tested this recipe with their other dry white wine: 152 Pinot Grigio. The broth was delicious with the Pinot Grigio, but the Sauvignon Blanc provided a little more depth of flavor. For drinking, all of the wines I tried were very tasty and approachable.

The numbers associated with each wine varietal are an indicator of the vine origin. The expert winemakers at Noble Vines have hand-selected some of the best vines directly from Europe. Clones of these vines were then planted and cultivated in vineyards located in Lodi and Monterey, combining European heritage with California terroir.


Watch the video: Ταραμοσαλάτα. Yiannis Lucacos


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  2. Vicage

    Brilliant idea



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