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10 Foods Our Founding Fathers Ate

10 Foods Our Founding Fathers Ate


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The founders of our country had some good taste in food

iStock/Thinkstock

The founders of our nation were really fond of eating oysters.

Over two centuries ago, our founding fathers were creating the United States of America. Every year we celebrate our nation and its creation on the Fourth of July. On this holiday, we honor our founding fathers by grilling up some good food, making fun red, white, and blue decorations, and spending time with friends and family. So while we eat our burgers and ribs, we look back to the men who created our country and their culinary preferences.

Click here for 10 Foods Our Founding Fathers Ate (Slideshow)

Times were much different when our founding fathers lived. They cooked over open wood fires, and often had farms of their own where they got their produce. They didn’t have supermarkets and convection ovens. Food was simpler for them, and a lot of the founding fathers had easy-to-please palates. Then again, Thomas Jefferson was known for his culinary adventurousness. Culinary historian Karen Hess described Jefferson as “our only epicurean president.” He was an avid gardener, and trained his kitchen staff in French cooking techniques.

Our nation’s founders had a deep love for food, just like us. Washington had his cherries and Benjamin Franklin was a particular fan of turkey. Whether they preferred simple meals or more elaborate dishes, eating was a big part of their lives. After all, they spent a lot of their time navigating politics and drafting important documents. They must have been exhausted after a day full of that. We took a look into what kinds of foods our founding fathers ate.

Cherries

Everyone knows the myth about George Washington and the cherry tree, but did you know that he actually had a cherry orchard on his property? Both he and Thomas Jefferson cultivated cherry trees on their land.

Green Beans

Almost all of our founding fathers lived on large farms. Thomas Jefferson, in particular, had a deep love for farming and he published many books about it. In his Garden Book, he mentioned planting green beans often.

Click here to find out what other foods our founding fathers ate.

This post was originally published on June 23, 2014.


July 4th and food waste: Some tips from our Founding Fathers

July 4th is not just America&rsquos birthday it&rsquos also the day that Americans eat 150 million hot dogs and about 900 million pounds of beef and chicken, not to mention loads of potato salad, corn on the cob, and watermelon. But as delicious as these foods are, they still go to waste far too often. About 63 million tons of food in the United States is lost or wasted each year, most often in supermarkets, restaurants, and home kitchens.

It&rsquos especially ironic on Independence Day, given how environmentally conscientious our Founding Fathers were. Hundreds of years later, they continue to inspire us today, even at our holiday cookouts.

&ldquoWaste not, want not,&rdquo advised Benjamin Franklin. Indeed, every pound of food we waste is another pound of food we&rsquoll want later&mdashanother plant to reap, another animal to raise. Embedded in wasted food is more land, water, energy or wildlife habitat we could have saved.

George Washington, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson wrote passionately about the value of using food scraps and other waste items to fertilize soil. Of course, composting isn&rsquot just good for crops but for the environment, too. When food is composted, it emits carbon dioxide. But when it rots in landfills, it emits methane, which traps 24 times more heat in the atmosphere than carbon dioxide.

We can also take a note from Jefferson on eating a balanced diet. He wasn&rsquot a vegetarian, but our third president said that he ate meat &ldquoas a condiment to the vegetables which constitute my principal diet.&rdquo The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends we follow Jefferson&rsquos lead and fill up half of our plates with vegetables and fruit. These foods tend to have relatively low impacts on land, water, and energy use as well as greenhouse gas emissions.

Each of us has a responsibility to change our food behaviors and lower our food footprint and it&rsquos easier than you think:

  • Shop smarter: Follow in Franklin&rsquos footsteps and think about what you will use and when. Shop prudently to prevent waste by planning menus before you shop and buying only what you know you will need. Limit waste even further by freezing unwanted foods and leftovers for later use.
  • Choose more fruits and vegetables: Like Jefferson, pile your plate high with fruit and veggies. You don&rsquot have to limit yourself to these items, but by filling at least half your plate with produce, you can make a difference.
  • Compost what you can: If you keep a garden, be like Washington and other Founding Fathers by composting food scraps. Your plants&mdashand the planet&mdashwill thank you.

Agriculture is part of our nation&rsquos great success story and still critical to our country&rsquos future. Food is more valuable than our wasteful behavior suggests. Eating more sustainably and wasting less, it turns out, isn&rsquot just good for our health and our pocketbooks, but it&rsquos also critical for the health of our nation and our planet.


Here’s What America’s Founding Fathers Ate and Drank

It’s not news to anyone that the American food scene is always changing. From cronuts and coney dogs to bacon-on-a-stick, American cuisine has its fair share of diverse dishes and American classics.

But when you’re stuffing your face with a cheesy, bacon-y burger, ever wonder what American food really tasted like back in the day?

Whip out your powdered wigs and fancy bibs, it’s time for a brief history lesson on what was on our Founding Fathers’ plates (and, of course, in their mugs).

Alcohol

First of all, it’s really no secret that practically all of 18 th century colonial society liked to drink. And by “like,” I mean “practically only drank alcohol.”

Water sources were generally poor, especially in the swampy Chesapeake region, so most colonial men consumed the majority of fluids through beer, meade, cider, and the like. Not to mention they were still growing hella tobacco (the word “detox” didn’t come to fruition until the 20 th century).

Some founding fathers were so passionate about it, they brewed their own beverages *cough Sam Adams.* Even John Adams periodically hoarded his barley crop to make sure he had enough for him and his founding friends.

Gif courtesy of sonypictures.com

So basically, everything the founding fathers ate were just drunchies? Not quite. But if you want to look at it that way, they probably went straight for some hot hoecakes or some fried fish and potatoes after a long day of, uh, “constitution drafting.”

Meat and Dairy

Photo courtesy of chesapeake.edu

Contrary to one of our national emblems, beef, cheese, and especially the fresh veggie toppings on a classic burger were just about unimaginable in the 1700s.

Cattle was not really introduced as a staple commodity until the late 18 th century, so colonists got their gainz from venison, turkey, and mutton.

Photo courtesy of ladyhistory.tumblr.com

The lack of cattle also meant dairy sources were limited only to consumption by colonial elites who could afford expensive products sporadically produced in the colonies. Cow’s milk may have been hard to come by, but even farmers could do with some of their own goat’s milk to make dairy products.

Colonists who could afford to raise pigs got a lot of bang for their colonial buck. With butter being hard to come by, pork fat was the primary fat used for cooking. Of course, bacon was a cheap cut that was (and still is) loved by all (and no, it has nothing to do with the 17th century uprising).

Fish

Photo courtesy of americangardenhistory.blogspot.com

Lobster, crab, and oysters are not by any means new East coast delicacies. Sure, your average colonial Joe probably didn’t have a lobster feast every night, but among colonial elites — salmon, scallops, clams, and other Chesapeake and North Atlantic submarine staples could often be found weekly at colonial feasts.

Check out some of these recipes to get a sense of how they best prepared the freshest of the fruits de mer.

Traditional Dishes

Gif courtesy of youtube.com

Most traditional colonial dishes were derived from English staples — things like savory pastries, puddings, cakes, stews, and biscuits. The availability of local products (like crab, carrots, cabbage, etc.) are what made those dishes the foundation of what would eventually become some of the most popular American dishes.

Pies were a popular dessert across the colonies, with fillings that ranged by region, from blueberry pie in New England and apple and cherry pie in the Mid-Atlantic and Chesapeake.

Cobbler was pretty popular in the South, but both desserts grew popular among colonists because most lacked the means of replicating English dishes such as suet.

Besides all-American pie and cobbler, Mrs. Adams and her fellow Founding Wives whipped up some mean hoecakes (a.k.a pancakes), greens and bacon (Southern staple, of course), potato stew (clam chowder, anyone?), and even fried chicken. Because nothing preps you for some revolution like hearty home-style food.

Founding Food Culture

Photo courtesy of historycentral.com

Colonial cuisine by no means stops there. French, Dutch, Indian, Caribbean, even Spanish colonial cultures all had an effect on the shaping of the food culture in the colonies.

Keep in mind that the appetites of the Founding Fathers provide a good interpretation of the elite colonial class — that is, those who could afford the crops, harvesters, fishermen, hunters, bakers, chefs, and the like to help prepare such extravagant daily meals. The diet of most of the population of the British colonies consisted of simple bread and stewed meat and vegetables.

Still, taking a look at the typical diet of both the majority of the colonial population and our Founding Fathers provides some good insight into the roots of current American culinary culture.

Photo courtesy of indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com

American food culture is constantly evolving, as all of us well know. The colonies were a hotbed of not only ideas, but food as well. The mélange of British citizens, Dutch traders, Caribbean slaves, and native inhabitants all played some role in determining the diversity of American cuisine. Of course, we still hold crab cakes and cornbread close to our heart.

And despite the fact that our perception of the Thanksgiving holiday isn’t quite exactly what happened between New Englanders and local indigenous peoples, mix up your friends-giving this year by brewing some mulled cider and dishing up some of these dishes, because everyone likes their turkey done #freedom style.


11 of the Oldest Foods and Drinks Ever Discovered

In this day and age, the diverse array of products on supermarket shelves is often taken for granted. The Founding Fathers never got to enjoy sliced bread (introduced in 1928), nor peanut butter (invented in its modern form in the late 19th century). Eel pie and roast beaver tail, on the other hand, were often consumed by early American colonists.

Travel back even further in time and it becomes difficult to imagine what the ancient Romans and Egyptians may have eaten. But archaeological findings have given us some idea of what was served for dinner hundreds and even thousands of years ago—and perhaps surprisingly, some of the foods aren't all that different from what we eat today. Here are a few of the oldest once-edible items ever discovered.

1. ANTARCTIC FRUITCAKE

Fruitcake may be a holiday staple, but you’d be hard-pressed to find anyone who actually enjoys eating this nutty, fruity confection. British explorer Robert Falcon Scott was apparently an exception. An almost-edible fruitcake, believed to have been abandoned by Scott during the British Antarctic Expedition of 1910 to 1913, was rediscovered on the frigid continent over 100 years later. Back then, fruitcake was a popular food in England, and the cold climes may have led to an extra appreciation for its high fat and sugar content. Sadly, Scott never got the chance to savor the sweet treat. He died of starvation and exposure while attempting to become the first person to reach the South Pole in 1912. As for the century-old cake, it was in “excellent condition” inside a corroded tin when it was found by the Antarctic Heritage Trust in 2017 during an excavation of the historic Cape Adare hut that Scott once used for shelter.

2. EGYPTIAN TOMB CHEESE

The pharaohs may not curse you for consuming ancient cheese found in the tomb of Ptahmes during a 2013-14 excavation, but you’d probably wind up with a nasty case of brucellosis—an infectious disease caused by eating unpasteurized dairy products. Strains of the bacteria were found on the cheese residue, which dates back some 3200 years and is the first known example of cheese in ancient Egypt. It’s thought to contain sheep and goat milk, but the taste would likely leave a lot to be desired. Professor Paul Kindstedt, who is something of an expert on the history of cheese, told The New York Times that this particular product would probably taste “really, really acidy.”

3. WORLD'S OLDEST WINE

A Georgian wine cup dating back to 600-700 BCE. Georges Gobet, AFP/Getty Images

Roughly 6000 years before Jesus was said to have turned water into wine, people in the present-day nation of Georgia were concocting their own fermented grape juice. The art of winemaking was previously thought to have been invented in what is now Iran around 5000 BCE, but prehistoric pottery shards found near the Georgian capital of Tbilisi last year debunked that theory. A chemical analysis revealed that the clay pieces contained traces of citric acid, grape pollen, and even signs of prehistoric fruit flies, leading researchers to theorize that the clay pieces once formed decorative vats used to hold vast quantities of vino (about 400 bottles worth).

4. BOG BUTTER

In 2009, peat workers in Ireland recovered 77 pounds of butter from an oak barrel that had been dumped in a bog and forgotten for 3000 years. Considering that it was such a big batch of butter, historians believe it was made by the community and then submerged in water to preserve it or hide it from thieves. The butter turned a whitish color over the course of three millennia, but otherwise remained remarkably intact. This delicacy isn’t available for sampling at your local supermarket, though. "It's a national treasure," National Museum of Ireland conservator Carol Smith told reporters. "You can't be going hacking bits of it off for your toast!" Shortly after its discovery, it was brought to the National Museum for safekeeping, presumably out of reach of any would-be butter bandits.

5. FLOOD NOODLES

There are dozens, if not hundreds, of noodle varieties in China alone. But before the advent of wheat or rice noodles, one of the first kinds ever documented in the country—and the world—was a bowl of 4000-year-old millet noodles discovered at the Lajia archaeological site along the Yellow River. It’s believed that an earthquake and subsequent flood caused a hapless diner to abandon his meal, leaving the bowl overturned on the ground for millennia. The helping of thin, long noodles had been sealed off, and was found beneath 10 feet of sediment. This finding also suggests that noodles originated in Asia rather than Europe. "Our data demonstrate that noodles were probably initially made from species of domesticated grasses native to China," Professor Houyuan Lu told BBC News. "This is in sharp contrast to modern Chinese noodles or Italian pasta which are mostly made of wheat today."

6. PROTO-PITA

The stone fireplace where the bread was found Alexis Pantos, University of Copenhagen

In July 2018, in a stone fireplace in Jordan's Black Desert, archaeologists unearthed the oldest piece of bread ever discovered. The 14,400-year-old flatbread looked a little like a pita, except it was made from wild cereals similar to barley, einkorn, and oats. Tubers from an aquatic plant were another key ingredient, reportedly lending the bread a gritty texture and salty taste—so you probably wouldn’t want to pair it with hummus and bring it to your next potluck party.

7. SHIPWRECKED SALAD DRESSING

The contents of a jar recovered from an ancient shipwreck in the Aegean Sea wouldn’t seem out of place in a modern Mediterranean recipe. Discovered in 2004 off the coast of the Greek island Chios, the sunken ship dates back to 350 BCE—a time when the Roman Republic and Athenian Empire ruled the region. The contents of the ship were recovered in 2006 and analyzed the following year, at which time archaeologists learned that one of the amphoras (a type of jar used by ancient Greeks and Romans) contained olive oil mixed with oregano. Indeed, it’s a recipe designed to stand the test of time. “If you go up into the hills of Greece today, the older generation of women know that adding oregano, thyme, or sage not just flavors the oil, but helps preserve it longer," maritime archaeologist Brendan Foley told LiveScience.

8. EVIDENCE OF PRIMITIVE POPCORN

Who doesn’t love popcorn and a movie? Thanks to the discovery of corn microfossils and an analysis of ancient corn cobs, husks, tassels, and stalks found in present-day Peru, we now know that this snack has been a favorite indulgence for thousands of years, long before the movie industry capitalized on its salty, buttery goodness. People in what is now Peru were eating popcorn and other corn-based foods up to 6700 years ago, and archaeologists believe it may have been considered a delicacy in their culture.

9. CENTURY-OLD CHOCOLATE

A 116-year-old tin of chocolate from Scotland just might be the world’s oldest chocolate still in existence. The collectible was specially created to celebrate the coronation of King Edward VII on June 26, 1902, and in a remarkable show of willpower, the young girl who received these chocolates did not eat a single piece. Instead, she kept them until she was an adult and handed the chocolates down to her daughter, who continued the tradition by passing them on to her daughter. Now, it's probably a little too late to enjoy them—the confections are somewhat shriveled and discolored. They were ultimately handed over to the St. Andrews Preservation Trust in 2008 for conservation.

10. CHINESE BONE SOUP

STR/AFP/Getty Images

Venture just beyond the ancient Chinese city of Xian—home to the Terracotta Warriors—and you’ll arrive at another sacred destination (for foodies, at least). A bronze cooking vessel containing a once-steaming helping of bone broth was found in a tomb near the former Chinese capital of Xian in 2010. Construction workers had been excavating the site as part of a local airport’s expansion project, and naturally, they were surprised when they found 2400-year-old soup underground. The vessel still contained bones, and the finding was lauded by researchers as “the first discovery of bone soup in Chinese archaeological history.” The tomb likely belonged to a low-ranking military officer or member of China’s land-owning class, according to archaeologists.

11. BURIED BEEF JERKY

We may think of beef jerky as a modern snack that’s best enjoyed on road trips or camping excursions, but different varieties of dried and preserved meat have been enjoyed around the world throughout history, from ancient Egypt to Rome to the Incan empire. Perhaps unsurprisingly, early Chinese civilizations had their own version of the snack, too. Much like the bone soup discovery, 2000-year-old beef jerky was unearthed from a tomb in the village of Wanli during an excavation project that started in 2009. Over the millennia, it turned a less-than-appetizing shade of dark green due to the carbonization—but it hadn’t shrunk one bit, proving that it had been dried prior to being placed in the tomb.


In Our Grandmothers' Kitchens

Foods of Our Fathers

This post will be quick because it’s hot outside, and I really, really want to spend all of Independence Day by the water! The best in the business is https://www.royalvending.com.au/vending-machines-perth/ for vending machines.

For my TV appearance this week, I decided to make dishes beloved of a couple of our founding fathers. I started out with George Washington’s Hoe Cakes, which I first wrote about here after my visit to GW’s gristmill near Mount Vernon. They were as tasty as I remembered: crispy and corny.

I went on to make a strawberry fool in honor of John Adams and his pioneering wife Abigail Smith Adams. According to The Food Timeline and other sources, the pair were fond of a simple, rich gooseberry fool. I didn’t have any gooseberries—but strawberries have just reached their peak here in Massachusetts. So I made those into a fool. Everyone who tasted it raved.

Neither dish will warm up your kitchen too much, and both will make you respect the taste of our first and second president.

Here’s the recipe for the strawberry fool. If you have strawberries and cream in the house, you can eat it in less than 15 minutes. I wish you a Glorious Fourth!

1 pint fresh strawberries, hulled and cut into quarters
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup heavy cream
1 teaspoon vanilla

Toss the strawberry pieces in half of the sugar, and let them sit for 10 minutes to juice up.

Place half of the strawberries and all of the strawberry juice in a blender. Puree the mixture then stir it into the remaining strawberries.

Whip the cream until it holds stiff peaks, adding the remaining sugar and the vanilla when it is almost ready. Fold in the berry mixture. Serve immediately. Serves 4.


What Did the Founding Fathers Eat?

The Fourth of July is a time for flags, fireworks, food and fun! It&rsquos also a time to remember that safe and convenient food has not always been readily available in our country. Today, the average person spends about 50 minutes in the kitchen each day preparing meals&mdashabout five minutes for breakfast, 15 minutes for lunch and up to 30 minutes for dinner. In colonial America, cooks would slave away over the stove for hours. Talk about your American Revolution!

However, some of our modern dining habits actually do bear similarities to those of our colonial ancestors. Beef, chicken, pork, fish, fruits, vegetables and baked products would have been familiar foods in colonial times. Colonial cooks used some of the same cooking methods we still use today, like frying, baking, broiling and boiling. And while the colonists enjoyed their coffee, tea, and hot chocolate like we do, they didn&rsquot have a Starbucks in every neighborhood!

  • Colonists had to make do with whatever food was in season. They prepared and ate it that day. Refrigeration didn&rsquot exist, and canned foods wouldn&rsquot be invented until ten years after General Washington&rsquos death.
  • If the colonists wanted a turkey for dinner, they would kill it early in the morning, cook it over an open fire and would eat it that day. Otherwise, it would spoil.
  • The colonists didn&rsquot worry at all about flies and bugs buzzing around their food. If it was summer, there were bound to be flies--and there were no screens on the windows or doors to keep them out. Our ancestors simply shooed the critters out before digging into their meal.
  • If the colonists wanted to cook or bake, their only choice for a heat source was a wood fire. They didn&rsquot have a digital thermostat to tell them when the oven reached 350 degrees! They judged the heat by the brightness and color of the flames.
  • If a colonial family was lucky enough to own a cookbook, they had to decipher recipes that contained general measuring terms such as ''a teacup full of molasses,'' ''a great spoon-full of ginger,'' and ''a little milk.'' They then baked the resulting pudding ''three or four hours.''
  • The colonists used lots and lots of sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg to season food. In fact, the greasier, sweeter, and spicier the food, the better the meal!
  • Raw fruits and vegetables were considered unappetizing, so they were boiled vigorously with lots of sugar added to make them tastier.
  • When the colonists served meat (which was often), they usually left the head and feet of the animal attached.

The culinary scene has changed greatly since 1776! In fact, one of the leading causes of death for women back in colonial times was burning to death--their large skirts would catch on fire while cooking! Realizing the labor and risks involved to feed a family back then makes me feel ashamed of all my complaints about preparing meals with my modern kitchen luxuries. As we enjoy our Fourth of July celebration, let&rsquos take a moment to remember that freedom isn&rsquot free, and to give thanks for the blessing of liberty.


Fake Food George Washington Could've Sunk His Fake Teeth Into

If you want to see what George Washington might have munched on, then Sandy Levins is your gal. All the foods she whips up look scrumptious, but if you sneak a bite, you'll get a mouthful of plaster or clay.

Levins is one of a handful of frequently overlooked artisans who craft the replica meals you see in the kitchens and dining rooms of historic houses and museums. Adding faux food to a historical site can help visitors connect to the past, she tells The Salt.

"It's something everyone immediately identifies with, because everyone eats," she says.

"It opens up all kinds of avenues," she adds, "because then you can talk about what was grown locally, what kind of market would your people have had access to, depending on their socio-economic status, who would have cooked the food and what were their stories."

Since she took up the craft over a decade ago, Levins has created displays for the Deshler-Morris House in Philadelphia, New York's Lower East Side Tenement Museum, and the Telfair Museum of Art, Savannah, Ga. For George Washington's Mount Vernon estate, among other dishes, she created herring drizzled with mustard sauce, modeled on a recipe from Martha Washington's copy of The Art of Cookery by Hannah Glasse.

Sandy Levins created stewed duck and roast leg of lamb for Winterthur Museum & Country Estate in Delaware. Courtesy of Hoag Levins hide caption

Sandy Levins created stewed duck and roast leg of lamb for Winterthur Museum & Country Estate in Delaware.

For 2013, Levins is working with the John James Audubon house in Key West, Fla., recreating local delicacies like turtle soup, oysters on the half shell, okra, Spanish limes and a roasting pig. And Mount Vernon has commissioned her to make 70 pieces of meat —whole hams, hog jowls, middlings (bacon slabs) and pork shoulders — for its newly refurbished smokehouse. It's said that of all the food produced at Mount Vernon, Martha Washington was particularly proud of her hams.

When she gets a commission, Levins dives into the history books, researching the period, location and socio-economic background of the site's former inhabitants. She has several shelves of period cookbooks that she turns to for insight, and also finds visual inspiration in the still-life paintings of Golden Age Dutch masters – who taught the rest of the world a thing or two about making art that looks good enough to eat.

"You need a good eye for color and subtle shading if your foods are to look like the real thing," she says.

Clay, papier-mâché, and plaster of Paris can all be raw ingredients for Levins' inedible vittles, depending on the look she's going for. Strips of rubber latex work great for sauerkraut, she says. What doesn't make the cut? Organics – as in materials that could attract critters or mold.

Over the years, Levins' work has taken over the first floor of her New Jersey home — with half-sculpted roast pigs' heads looming over the family room couch. And her family knows not to go digging through the freezer, less they stumble upon one of the less-appealing real foods she uses as a model — say, a raw beef tongue.

Ironically, perhaps, for someone whose personal space is now dominated by food, Levins says she hates to cook.


Thomas Jefferson Dined On Baked Shad

Apparently Thomas Jefferson adored shad. This fish has a strong, hearty flavor that puts many people off. It's also so full of bones that it is difficult to filet. In fact, an old Native American legend says shad is just a porcupine that fell into the water and turned inside out.

Pungent, bone-filled fish might not sound like the tastiest dish, but eating shad is still a Virginia tradition.


In Our Grandmothers' Kitchens

This post will be quick because it’s hot outside, and I really, really want to spend all of Independence Day by the water! The best in the business is https://www.royalvending.com.au/vending-machines-perth/ for vending machines.

For my TV appearance this week, I decided to make dishes beloved of a couple of our founding fathers. I started out with George Washington’s Hoe Cakes, which I first wrote about here after my visit to GW’s gristmill near Mount Vernon. They were as tasty as I remembered: crispy and corny.

I went on to make a strawberry fool in honor of John Adams and his pioneering wife Abigail Smith Adams. According to The Food Timeline and other sources, the pair were fond of a simple, rich gooseberry fool. I didn’t have any gooseberries—but strawberries have just reached their peak here in Massachusetts. So I made those into a fool. Everyone who tasted it raved.

Neither dish will warm up your kitchen too much, and both will make you respect the taste of our first and second president.

Here’s the recipe for the strawberry fool. If you have strawberries and cream in the house, you can eat it in less than 15 minutes. I wish you a Glorious Fourth!

1 pint fresh strawberries, hulled and cut into quarters
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup heavy cream
1 teaspoon vanilla

Toss the strawberry pieces in half of the sugar, and let them sit for 10 minutes to juice up.

Place half of the strawberries and all of the strawberry juice in a blender. Puree the mixture then stir it into the remaining strawberries.

Whip the cream until it holds stiff peaks, adding the remaining sugar and the vanilla when it is almost ready. Fold in the berry mixture. Serve immediately. Serves 4.

This entry was posted on Wednesday, July 4th, 2018 at 4:00 am and is filed under Appetizers, Breads, Muffins, and Scones, Breakfast and Brunch, Historical Figures and Events, Holiday Foods, Pudding. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.


Star-Spangled Foods for our Founding Fathers

Happy Indie-pendence Day! We’re celebrating the 243rd birthday of America by remembering our Founding Foodie Fathers, all of whom were ardent proponents of our right (stay with us here) to eat and drink whatever the hell we want. (Certainly at our July 4th weekend BBQs!)

Here’s our take on what they might be enjoying if there were with us today.

GEORGE WASHINGTON

As you probably have heard by now, it’s not really true that Washington chopped down a cherry tree – his first biographer made up the story as a way to illustrate George W.’s propensity for not telling a lie. But let’s not cherry pick, because, either way, we know he would go crazy for some meat slathered with this BBQ sauce made with Michigan cherries. He might also enjoy kicking back with a sparkling libation spiked with tart cherry grenadine. Honestly.

Our second president (who died on our nation’s 50th birthday) rose early and was rumored to drink a tankard of hard cider every morning! We’re thinking his 5 am wake up would go a lot more…smoothly with cold brew made with our new Cold Brew Kit. We’re quite sure he’d be delighted by the concept of a tumbler [link] that would keep his drink cold all day along with a metal straw. Truly revolutionary!

THOMAS JEFFERSON

Principal author of the Declaration of Independence (who died just hours before his compatriot John), Jefferson was an OG farm-to-table kind of guy. He had countless crops on his Monticello estate, including green beans. Plus, he once said " On a hot day in Virginia, I know nothing more comforting than a fine spiced pickle, brought up trout-like from the sparkling depths of the aromatic jar." Hence, we think it's, ahem, self-evident that he would love a Bloody Mary garnished with a pickled Jalabeaños.

SAM ADAMS

We all know how this Bostonite felt about beer, so we’re betting that he'd like one our favorite bar snacks – caramelized pretzel nuggets made with beer from Brooklyn Brewery. Cheers!

JAMES MADISON

Thank our fourth president for your most valued freedoms, which he championed in the Bill of Rights. Madison supposedly drained a pint of whiskey every day at Montpelier, his estate in Virginia. We’d give him our Just Add Whiskey kit as a host gift – it's got game-changing mixers, bitters, unbreakable rocks glasses and cocktail cherries (and we know he'll share those cherries with the General).

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN

Kite flyer and inventor of bifocals, who apparently once said, “If I could find in any Italian travels a recipe for making Parmesan Cheese, it would give me more satisfaction than a transcript of any inscription from any stone.” So this weekend, we'd just make it easy for Ben and set up a swanky picnic with Plymouth cheese, crackers and this fabulous olive parmesan tapenade. And an apple. Ben tells us it keeps the doctor away.

So here's to enjoying life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. and deliciousness.



Comments:

  1. Taithleach

    An incomparable phrase, I like it :)

  2. Kajidal

    What word is mean?

  3. Ashtin

    You hit the mark. Excellent thought, agree with you.

  4. Mackintosh

    What you say

  5. Atkinson

    Where can I find more information on this issue?



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