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Mashed potatoes recipe

Mashed potatoes recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Vegetable
  • Root vegetables
  • Potato
  • Potato side dishes
  • Mashed potato

Always a favourite, here's a simple and delicious mashed potato recipe.


Cumbria, England, UK

8 people made this

IngredientsServes: 6

  • 6 floury potatoes, peeled and quartered
  • 125ml milk
  • 50g butter
  • 1 teaspoon salt, or to taste

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:20min ›Ready in:30min

  1. Place potatoes in a large pot and cover with water. Cover and bring to the boil; boil until very tender, about 15 to 20 minutes.
  2. Drain water from the cooked potatoes and and return to pot. Add milk, butter and salt; mash until light and fluffy.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(4)

Reviews in English (3)

Something else.if you are doing a pork or lamb dish to accompany the mash try adding a tsp of freshly chopped rosemary at the mashing stage-07 Jun 2010

Yum-05 Apr 2015

by steve.rand

Easy! I chopped some chives and sprinkled them over the top to impress the wife. Landed a Lamb Kofta on top of the mash, then a Tomato Salsa recipe over that.-22 Jul 2014(Review from this site AU | NZ)


"Preparing these ahead of time really took some of the stress away. They were tasty and loved by all."

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Mashed potatoes recipe - Recipes

WHAT'S FOR DINNER? CHOOSE FROM HUNDREDS OF RECIPES BELOW! CHOOSE YOUR SKILL RECIPES FOR THE NOVICE OR THE MASTER CHEF! RECIPES THEY'LL LOVE FAMILY TESTED, KID APPROVED! WHAT'S FOR DINNER? CHOOSE FROM HUNDREDS OF RECIPES BELOW! CHOOSE YOUR SKILL RECIPES FOR THE NOVICE OR THE MASTER CHEF! RECIPES THEY'LL LOVE FAMILY TESTED, KID APPROVED! WHAT'S FOR DINNER? CHOOSE FROM HUNDREDS OF RECIPES BELOW! CHOOSE YOUR SKILL RECIPES FOR THE NOVICE OR THE MASTER CHEF! RECIPES THEY'LL LOVE FAMILY TESTED, KID APPROVED! WHAT'S FOR DINNER? CHOOSE FROM HUNDREDS OF RECIPES BELOW! CHOOSE YOUR SKILL RECIPES FOR THE NOVICE OR THE MASTER CHEF! RECIPES THEY'LL LOVE FAMILY TESTED, KID APPROVED! WHAT'S FOR DINNER? CHOOSE FROM HUNDREDS OF RECIPES BELOW! CHOOSE YOUR SKILL RECIPES FOR THE NOVICE OR THE MASTER CHEF! RECIPES THEY'LL LOVE FAMILY TESTED, KID APPROVED! WHAT'S FOR DINNER? CHOOSE FROM HUNDREDS OF RECIPES BELOW! CHOOSE YOUR SKILL RECIPES FOR THE NOVICE OR THE MASTER CHEF! RECIPES THEY'LL LOVE FAMILY TESTED, KID APPROVED! WHAT'S FOR DINNER? CHOOSE FROM HUNDREDS OF RECIPES BELOW! CHOOSE YOUR SKILL RECIPES FOR THE NOVICE OR THE MASTER CHEF!


Yes, You Can Make Delicious Mashed Potatoes Without Butter

With cashew cream, garlic, and olive oil, star chef Gregory Gourdet gives this classic side dish a makeover—and you won’t even miss the butter.

Anna Archibald

Gregory Gourdet/Eva Kosmas Flores

One of Gregory Gourdet’s favorite dishes to make is mashed potatoes. But the former Top Chef contestant and founder of Kann, a Haitian pop-up in Portland, Oregon, didn’t grow up eating the classic side dish.

“I grew up in a Haitian household—we didn’t really eat mashed potatoes,” he says. Instead, his Queens, New York, family ate a lot of rice. But once he started cooking professionally that all changed. “I made mashed potatoes in pretty much almost every restaurant I worked at for like the first five years of my career.”

“My strongest memory of mashed potatoes is probably working at Jean-Georges,” says Gourdet. “When I first started working there, there was a slow-cooked salmon dish with mashed potatoes and truffle vinaigrette—it was really one of the first dishes I had to make in a professional setting. They were creamy and super buttery. It’s just that kind of comforting earthiness that just makes you feel good.”

So when he was considering what to include in his new cookbook, Everyone’s Table: Global Recipes for Modern Health, the chef knew he wanted to feature his signature Dirty Mashed Potatoes. The recipe, however, leaves the standard butter and cream behind for healthier ingredients.

“For me, health is something that’s extremely important,” he says. “I got sober about 12 years ago and changing my diet and changing my outlook on life, that was part of it. I’ve also been traveling around the world and experiencing global flavors. When I think about what I want to eat at home, it’s this health-forward food that doesn’t compromise anything.”

In this case, not compromising on flavor means including cashew cream, a whopping 30 cloves of garlic and plenty of olive oil.

The best part is that these mashed potatoes are fantastically simple to make and “they’re pretty spectacular,” he says. Here are the chef’s tips and tricks for making his deliciously creamy mashed potatoes.

Gourdet’s ideal potato provides a creaminess as well as a backbone of earthy flavor. And since he doesn’t remove the skin (it adds texture and fiber), the chef prefers small potatoes, such as new potatoes, red bliss or fingerlings.

“There are tons and tons of different types of potatoes,” he says. “Some are best for frying, some for roasting and these varieties are best for mashed potatoes.”

While butter and cream usually provide the creamy texture of a decadent bowl of mashed potatoes, Gourdet instead opts to replace the ingredients with alternative fats—nearly a cup of olive oil and homemade cashew cream.

“You can puree cashews with various amounts of liquid to make anything from cashew milk to cashew cream,” he says. And it’s really that easy. After letting the cashews soak in salted water for about an hour, they go into a blender. The resulting cream acts much in the way that heavy cream or half-and-half would. “The cashew cream is really just there for the mouthfeel of it all,” he says. “It doesn’t actually taste like cashews. It’s a lot of potatoes. It’s a lot of olive oil. It’s a lot of onions and garlic. So the cashew cream is really there to kind of be the binder that makes it rich and creamy.”

While the cashew cream may not lend much flavor, Gourdet cooks down two yellow onions and a whopping 30 cloves of garlic, which he then folds into the mashed potatoes. (This along with the skin is what gives it the “dirty”—albeit delicious—quality.)

“The secret to these is really getting those onions and that garlic beautifully caramelized, so you have like this really kind of sweet, savory caramelized onion and garlic flavor,” he says.

After all the ingredients have been incorporated, the final step is a last-minute broil to give the top layer of potatoes a bit of a “crackle.”

“I love that it’s called dirty mashed potatoes,” says Gourdet. “Really just throw everything in the pot and mash it all together. This is truly a decadent dish.”

INGREDIENTS

  • 1.5 cups Raw cashews
  • 2 tbsp Kosher salt
  • 1.5 cups Water
  • .74 cup Extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 Large yellow onions, cut into thin half-moon slices
  • 30 Garlic cloves, sliced as thin as the onions
  • 1.5 pounds Small potatoes

DIRECTIONS

To Make the Cashew Cream:

Combine the cashews, 1 tbsp salt and the water in a small mixing bowl and let the nuts soak at room temperature for 1 hour. (It’s okay if they float.) Transfer the mixture to a blender and blend on high speed until very smooth, about 2 minutes.

To Make the Onions & Garlic:

While the cashews are soaking, heat the oil in a large, heavy skillet (the onions should fit in about two layers) over medium-high heat until shimmery. Add the onions and 1 tbsp salt, stir well, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions start to soften and release liquid, about 3 minutes. Stir in the garlic, then reduce the heat to medium, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions have a slightly creamy texture and turn golden and even a little brown at the edges, about 7 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium-low and keep cooking until the onions have a very creamy and almost melting texture, 5 to 8 minutes more. Turn off the heat.

To Make the Dish:

In a medium pot, combine the potatoes and enough water to cover by an inch or so and bring to a strong simmer over high heat. Adjust the heat and simmer until you can cut one of the potatoes in half with no resistance, about 15 minutes. Drain well, reserving 1 cup of cooking liquid. Return the potatoes to the medium pot, add the onion mixture (including the oil), then crush and stir to make a chunky mash. Add the cashew mixture and use a whisk to incorporate the cream into the potatoes.

Gradually add up to 1 cup of the reserved cooking liquid so the mixture has the texture of slightly loose, creamy mashed potatoes. You can do this up to 2 hours in advance.

Move an oven rack to the top position and preheat the broiler. Transfer the mixture to a casserole dish or another shallow ovenproof pot that’ll hold it in a 3- or 4-inch layer. Broil on the top rack until the top is bubbly and golden brown, about 3 minutes. Serve hot.


Ingredient Notes

  • Potatoes – I prefer Yukon Gold potatoes or Russet Potatoes. See “FAQs & Expert Tips” for more info.
  • Salt & Pepper – I usually use white pepper, but black pepper works as well, especially if you like to see the black specks in the potatoes.
  • Butter – I always use unsalted butter in most of my cooking and baking because this way I can control the amount of salt that goes in my food.
  • Half and Half or Milk – My mom usually uses milk but if you would like these potatoes to be a bit creamier go with half and half cream which contains 12 % fat. You can even go ahead and use heavy cream which usually contains 38 % fat.

Wanting to add some other ingredients to your mashed potatoes? Here are some of my recommendations.

Bacon Mashed Potatoes – Cook between 1/4 to to 3/4 of a pound of bacon until crispy. Replace half the butter in the recipe below with 1/8 cup – 1/4 cup bacon grease.
Cheddar Mashed Potatoes – Add in about 3 of shredded cheddar cheese. Then add in 1/4 cup of parsley or chives for some some great tasting cheesy cheddar mashed potatoes.
Other Possible Flavor Additions: Dill, red bell peppers, pesto, Parmesan cheese, Italian sausage, or garlic.


Nutrition

I make my mashed patties as thin as possible and combine 1/3 jiffy cornbread mix and jalapenos and habaneros and a Doritos crusted rub and fry them in a mix of truffle and peanut oil then I make a triple decker Sammy with 80/20 ground beef Applewood smoked bacon and smoked brisket and a sautéed apple and honey infused apple vinegar and lemon pepper based pulled pork, topped with home made mozzarella and smoked gouda and smoked dill spears and to top it all off a grape jelly/bourbon based sauce with dill and lemon on a brioche bun Yummy for my Tummy and yours too.

I have never tried fried mashed potatoes before. This recipe is amazing! I added shredded mozzarella cheese, bacon crumbles and a little garlic butter. I never write reviews for anything, no matter how much a site begs for it. But for this, I looked for the place to start typing. GREAT RECIPE.

My Mom made these all the time while I was growing up. the one thing she always added was chopped onions and I CONTINUE TO MAKE THEM THIS WAY.

I make these very thin so they get super crispy and then top them with sour cream and crumbled fried bacon so they are kind of like loaded baked potatoes but in crispy pancake form. Serious comfort food. I found that it works much better with real potatoes that are mashed versus leftover instant potatoes so if you try it and it's not quite right make sure you use real potatoes for best results. I don't always make mashed from real potatoes but it's worth it if you want to make some extra to make this recipe.

We use this as our base recipe but dress it up! Chop and drain well some roasted green chiles, crush some garlic, and add some cumin!

Very good idea for leftovers! They were a little soft in the middle still but the outside was getting very brown so we ate them. Maybe turning the heat down a little would work better or maybe I made them too thick. Flavor was quite good though. Only made about 4.

I actually make extra mashed everytime just so I can make this recipe. I've also made it into balls and deep fried, works great both ways.

I had made a big batch of mashed potatoes ahead of time to go with chicken fried steak for 8 people. 3 people cancelled on us so I put the steaks back in the freezer but had all these extra mashed to deal with. Made this recipe the next day and LOVED them! Added a little garlic and finely minced rosemary. It's a good basic recipe that is pretty forgiving and will let you change flavors and such.

Great way to use leftover mashed potatoes. My husband and I thought a good addition might be a little garlic. I made these for breakfast the day after Christmas this year to use the mass quantities of potatoes we cooked and had leftover.

This was an EXCELLENT way to use up leftover mashed potatoes from my Thanksgiving dinner. I HATE throwing away food, so I'm always looking for clever ways to use things up in the kitchen. I used a gluten-free flour blend in place of regular flour and threw in some chopped chives and parsley that were in my refrigerator. I think the only thing I would change about this recipe is to cut back on the oil. I didn't use a full 1/4 cup, about 3 Tbsp., and this was still quite a bit. If you get your pan hot enough, you should only need 2 Tbsp., or even less, to get the patties browned and heated through. Because these are potatoes and quite porous, they WILL absorb quite a bit of the oil. Mine were a bit heavy on my stomach. Otherwise, perfectly easy snack or cheap meal for any night of the week!


  • 2 lbs. (1 kg) russet potatoes, scrubbed but unpeeled
  • 1 tablespoon coarse salt
  • 10 oz. (300 g) unsalted butter (2 1/2 sticks), cut into cubes
  • 250 ml. (1 cup) whole milk
  • 2 1/4 teaspoons salt
  • 3 dashes ground white pepper
  1. Put the potatoes in a saucepan with 8 cups of cold water and 1 tablespoon of coarse salt. Bring to a simmer, cover, and cook until a knife slips in the potatoes easily and cleanly, about 30 minutes. Drain the potatoes and peel them.
  2. Put them through a potato ricer into a large bowl.
  3. Slowly mill the potatoes through the potato ricer.
  4. In a small sauce pan heat up the milk and bring to a boil. Meanwhile, transfer the potatoes to a Dutch oven or sauce pan. On medium-low heat, add the chilled butter cubes to the potatoes and stir continuously for a smooth and creamy texture, about 5 minutes.
  5. Pour in the very hot milk in a thin stream, stirring briskly. Keep stirring until all the milk is absorbed. Turn off the heat and add the 2 1/4 teaspoons salt and ground white pepper.
  6. Serve the mashed potatoes immediately. If you like, add a small cube of butter on top of the mashed potatoes before serving.

46 Easy Mashed Potatoes To Help You Find the Ultimate Holiday Side

Just because something is easy doesn't mean it has to be boring or bland. Enter, these (insanely delicious!) easy mashed potatoes. At its most basic, it&rsquos super simple to make mashed potatoes from scratch: Boil potatoes, then mash with milk or cream, salt, and butter. Few ingredients, few steps &mdash but, we all know that this no-frills version tastes anything but basic. Heavenly, decadent, rich, and velvety are just a few words we'd use to describe 'em.

Here, we're dishing out our favorite ways to prepare the smashed spuds, whether you're pulling out all the stops for Thanksgiving dinner or pulling together a simple weeknight meal. You won&rsquot be disappointed by our best creamy mashed potatoes recipes, including garlic mashed potatoes, mashed potatoes with cream cheese, mashed potatoes with sour cream, and cheesy mashed potatoes!

Plus, we're mixing up the main vegetable&mdash from parsnips to sweet potatoes to cauliflower&mdash so you can sneak a few extra nutrients into everyone&rsquos favorite Thanksgiving side dish. We've also included a number of different cooking styles according to what you prefer, whether you like your mashed potatoes without milk or your mashed potatoes with heavy cream, we&rsquove got you covered. Do you prefer your mashed potatoes with skin or without? Any of these recipes can be adjusted according to what you love. The options are endless, and endlessly customizable!

Before you get started, check out our guide on how to make the best mashed potatoes, and ideas for using up leftovers. Just be warned: You should probably make a double batch if you're hoping for any extra. These recipes are that good!


How to Make It

Place potatoes in a large Dutch oven cover with cold water by 1 inch. Place pan over medium-high. Bring to a simmer cook potatoes 17 minutes or until completely tender. Drain well. Return potatoes to pan place over medium-low. Cook 5 minutes or until all the liquid has evaporated, stirring occasionally (do not brown). Place potatoes in a food mill or large colander with medium-small (1/8-inch) holes.

Combine milk and butter in pan over medium-low cook until butter melts, stirring occasionally. Set mill or colander over pan crank mill, or use the back of a ladle or large spoon to press cooked potato through colander into milk mixture. Add salt and pepper to milled potato in pan stir well to combine.



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