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13 Whites from Italy, Spain, and Portugal

13 Whites from Italy, Spain, and Portugal


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Labor Day is the dividing line between the heights of summer and the downhill slide into autumn and winter, so now — while the weather is still blazing hot — is the time to enjoy these cool whites. Even the basic ones are easy-drinking, refreshing, and affordable.

Astoria “Galiè” Prosecco Extra Dry NV ($10). Good richness with pleasant, firm texture.

Aveleda Vinho Verde Alvarinho 2015 ($12). From one of the Minho region’s best-known estates, this wine has clean green flavors of lime and gooseberries with good structure and medium weight.

Fattori Runcaris Soave Classico 2014 ($12). Lively but rich with good minerality and a blend of tart and ripe fruit flavors.

Quinta da Lixa Vinho Verde 2015 ($10). A blend of alvarinho, loureiro, and trajadura grapes, this one has lots of spritz and intense green-fruit flavors, especially of lime, and is quite refreshing

La Val Rías Baixas Albariño 2014 ($14). Some orange and other citrus flavors emerge from a pleasant savory background.

Tommasi Tenuta Filodora Prosecco NV ($16). Nice powdery, floral flavors, good balance and richness; quite pleasant.

Castello Soave Classico 2013 ($17). Gamey nose and good richness of flavor; a pleasant fruit/savory mix.

Tomada de Castro Val do Salnés Rías Baixas Albariño 2014 ($17). Pleasant floral aromas, good white peach and apple flavors, and a balancing touch of earthiness.

Donnafugata “Sur Sur” Sicilia Bianco-Grillo 2015 ($20). A little gamey, a little grassy, juicy, with medium body.

Kettmeir Alto Adige Müller-Thurgau 2014 ($20). A basic but well-constructed table wine from a lesser-known variety; full-bodied, yet with a crisp finish.

Kettmeir Alto Adige Pinot Grigio 2014 ($20). A pleasant, simple, carafe-style wine for easy drinking.

Lagar de Bouza Rías Baixas Albariño 2015 ($20). Good acidity but not overly lean, with a broad apple start and a fresh, green finish.

Peter Zemmer Alto Adige Pinot Grigio 2015 ($20). Very fresh on the palate with lively, green-fruit flavors and good texture.


The Essential Gluten Free Guide to Portugal

I spent several months in Portugal, one in Lisbon and the rest on the island of Madeira. I traveled there initially to speak at a food conference I stayed because I did not want to stop eating with friends. From fresh seafood to perfectly steamed vegetables to satisfying soups, the country left my taste buds hankering for more. This gluten free Portugal guide shares some of what was safe, what was off limits, and the lessons I learned in the process the hard way — I’m looking at you, yellow mustard.

Portugal’s emphasis on quality ingredients as the building blocks of their meals made it easy to find food safely. As with many countries, snack time is the hardest — on-the-go sandwiches are off limits, as are the amazing pastel de nata tarts, though gluten free versions have popped up around town.

I found that the country’s grocery items were clearly marked for celiacs — a sticker applied to packaging states that it is gluten-free. Companies are also required by law to disclose any allergen, including wheat, rye, barley, or oats, and these are identified in bold on the ingredient list. Where they are gluten free, in Portuguese they would often say isento de glúten.

For eating out, many menus of the day (larger lunchtime meals) include a simple grilled main with roasted potatoes, vegetables, and rice. These were almost always safe. Check the list of foods below, and bring the gluten free card with you, to double check. Grilled chicken and piri-piri chicken was almost always safe, unless made using a marinade or broth that had wheat. I did not have any trouble with this in Portugal, though I have at Portuguese restaurants abroad.

THIS POST WAS LAST UPDATED: JANUARY 2021


The Essential Gluten Free Guide to Portugal

I spent several months in Portugal, one in Lisbon and the rest on the island of Madeira. I traveled there initially to speak at a food conference I stayed because I did not want to stop eating with friends. From fresh seafood to perfectly steamed vegetables to satisfying soups, the country left my taste buds hankering for more. This gluten free Portugal guide shares some of what was safe, what was off limits, and the lessons I learned in the process the hard way — I’m looking at you, yellow mustard.

Portugal’s emphasis on quality ingredients as the building blocks of their meals made it easy to find food safely. As with many countries, snack time is the hardest — on-the-go sandwiches are off limits, as are the amazing pastel de nata tarts, though gluten free versions have popped up around town.

I found that the country’s grocery items were clearly marked for celiacs — a sticker applied to packaging states that it is gluten-free. Companies are also required by law to disclose any allergen, including wheat, rye, barley, or oats, and these are identified in bold on the ingredient list. Where they are gluten free, in Portuguese they would often say isento de glúten.

For eating out, many menus of the day (larger lunchtime meals) include a simple grilled main with roasted potatoes, vegetables, and rice. These were almost always safe. Check the list of foods below, and bring the gluten free card with you, to double check. Grilled chicken and piri-piri chicken was almost always safe, unless made using a marinade or broth that had wheat. I did not have any trouble with this in Portugal, though I have at Portuguese restaurants abroad.

THIS POST WAS LAST UPDATED: JANUARY 2021


The Essential Gluten Free Guide to Portugal

I spent several months in Portugal, one in Lisbon and the rest on the island of Madeira. I traveled there initially to speak at a food conference I stayed because I did not want to stop eating with friends. From fresh seafood to perfectly steamed vegetables to satisfying soups, the country left my taste buds hankering for more. This gluten free Portugal guide shares some of what was safe, what was off limits, and the lessons I learned in the process the hard way — I’m looking at you, yellow mustard.

Portugal’s emphasis on quality ingredients as the building blocks of their meals made it easy to find food safely. As with many countries, snack time is the hardest — on-the-go sandwiches are off limits, as are the amazing pastel de nata tarts, though gluten free versions have popped up around town.

I found that the country’s grocery items were clearly marked for celiacs — a sticker applied to packaging states that it is gluten-free. Companies are also required by law to disclose any allergen, including wheat, rye, barley, or oats, and these are identified in bold on the ingredient list. Where they are gluten free, in Portuguese they would often say isento de glúten.

For eating out, many menus of the day (larger lunchtime meals) include a simple grilled main with roasted potatoes, vegetables, and rice. These were almost always safe. Check the list of foods below, and bring the gluten free card with you, to double check. Grilled chicken and piri-piri chicken was almost always safe, unless made using a marinade or broth that had wheat. I did not have any trouble with this in Portugal, though I have at Portuguese restaurants abroad.

THIS POST WAS LAST UPDATED: JANUARY 2021


The Essential Gluten Free Guide to Portugal

I spent several months in Portugal, one in Lisbon and the rest on the island of Madeira. I traveled there initially to speak at a food conference I stayed because I did not want to stop eating with friends. From fresh seafood to perfectly steamed vegetables to satisfying soups, the country left my taste buds hankering for more. This gluten free Portugal guide shares some of what was safe, what was off limits, and the lessons I learned in the process the hard way — I’m looking at you, yellow mustard.

Portugal’s emphasis on quality ingredients as the building blocks of their meals made it easy to find food safely. As with many countries, snack time is the hardest — on-the-go sandwiches are off limits, as are the amazing pastel de nata tarts, though gluten free versions have popped up around town.

I found that the country’s grocery items were clearly marked for celiacs — a sticker applied to packaging states that it is gluten-free. Companies are also required by law to disclose any allergen, including wheat, rye, barley, or oats, and these are identified in bold on the ingredient list. Where they are gluten free, in Portuguese they would often say isento de glúten.

For eating out, many menus of the day (larger lunchtime meals) include a simple grilled main with roasted potatoes, vegetables, and rice. These were almost always safe. Check the list of foods below, and bring the gluten free card with you, to double check. Grilled chicken and piri-piri chicken was almost always safe, unless made using a marinade or broth that had wheat. I did not have any trouble with this in Portugal, though I have at Portuguese restaurants abroad.

THIS POST WAS LAST UPDATED: JANUARY 2021


The Essential Gluten Free Guide to Portugal

I spent several months in Portugal, one in Lisbon and the rest on the island of Madeira. I traveled there initially to speak at a food conference I stayed because I did not want to stop eating with friends. From fresh seafood to perfectly steamed vegetables to satisfying soups, the country left my taste buds hankering for more. This gluten free Portugal guide shares some of what was safe, what was off limits, and the lessons I learned in the process the hard way — I’m looking at you, yellow mustard.

Portugal’s emphasis on quality ingredients as the building blocks of their meals made it easy to find food safely. As with many countries, snack time is the hardest — on-the-go sandwiches are off limits, as are the amazing pastel de nata tarts, though gluten free versions have popped up around town.

I found that the country’s grocery items were clearly marked for celiacs — a sticker applied to packaging states that it is gluten-free. Companies are also required by law to disclose any allergen, including wheat, rye, barley, or oats, and these are identified in bold on the ingredient list. Where they are gluten free, in Portuguese they would often say isento de glúten.

For eating out, many menus of the day (larger lunchtime meals) include a simple grilled main with roasted potatoes, vegetables, and rice. These were almost always safe. Check the list of foods below, and bring the gluten free card with you, to double check. Grilled chicken and piri-piri chicken was almost always safe, unless made using a marinade or broth that had wheat. I did not have any trouble with this in Portugal, though I have at Portuguese restaurants abroad.

THIS POST WAS LAST UPDATED: JANUARY 2021


The Essential Gluten Free Guide to Portugal

I spent several months in Portugal, one in Lisbon and the rest on the island of Madeira. I traveled there initially to speak at a food conference I stayed because I did not want to stop eating with friends. From fresh seafood to perfectly steamed vegetables to satisfying soups, the country left my taste buds hankering for more. This gluten free Portugal guide shares some of what was safe, what was off limits, and the lessons I learned in the process the hard way — I’m looking at you, yellow mustard.

Portugal’s emphasis on quality ingredients as the building blocks of their meals made it easy to find food safely. As with many countries, snack time is the hardest — on-the-go sandwiches are off limits, as are the amazing pastel de nata tarts, though gluten free versions have popped up around town.

I found that the country’s grocery items were clearly marked for celiacs — a sticker applied to packaging states that it is gluten-free. Companies are also required by law to disclose any allergen, including wheat, rye, barley, or oats, and these are identified in bold on the ingredient list. Where they are gluten free, in Portuguese they would often say isento de glúten.

For eating out, many menus of the day (larger lunchtime meals) include a simple grilled main with roasted potatoes, vegetables, and rice. These were almost always safe. Check the list of foods below, and bring the gluten free card with you, to double check. Grilled chicken and piri-piri chicken was almost always safe, unless made using a marinade or broth that had wheat. I did not have any trouble with this in Portugal, though I have at Portuguese restaurants abroad.

THIS POST WAS LAST UPDATED: JANUARY 2021


The Essential Gluten Free Guide to Portugal

I spent several months in Portugal, one in Lisbon and the rest on the island of Madeira. I traveled there initially to speak at a food conference I stayed because I did not want to stop eating with friends. From fresh seafood to perfectly steamed vegetables to satisfying soups, the country left my taste buds hankering for more. This gluten free Portugal guide shares some of what was safe, what was off limits, and the lessons I learned in the process the hard way — I’m looking at you, yellow mustard.

Portugal’s emphasis on quality ingredients as the building blocks of their meals made it easy to find food safely. As with many countries, snack time is the hardest — on-the-go sandwiches are off limits, as are the amazing pastel de nata tarts, though gluten free versions have popped up around town.

I found that the country’s grocery items were clearly marked for celiacs — a sticker applied to packaging states that it is gluten-free. Companies are also required by law to disclose any allergen, including wheat, rye, barley, or oats, and these are identified in bold on the ingredient list. Where they are gluten free, in Portuguese they would often say isento de glúten.

For eating out, many menus of the day (larger lunchtime meals) include a simple grilled main with roasted potatoes, vegetables, and rice. These were almost always safe. Check the list of foods below, and bring the gluten free card with you, to double check. Grilled chicken and piri-piri chicken was almost always safe, unless made using a marinade or broth that had wheat. I did not have any trouble with this in Portugal, though I have at Portuguese restaurants abroad.

THIS POST WAS LAST UPDATED: JANUARY 2021


The Essential Gluten Free Guide to Portugal

I spent several months in Portugal, one in Lisbon and the rest on the island of Madeira. I traveled there initially to speak at a food conference I stayed because I did not want to stop eating with friends. From fresh seafood to perfectly steamed vegetables to satisfying soups, the country left my taste buds hankering for more. This gluten free Portugal guide shares some of what was safe, what was off limits, and the lessons I learned in the process the hard way — I’m looking at you, yellow mustard.

Portugal’s emphasis on quality ingredients as the building blocks of their meals made it easy to find food safely. As with many countries, snack time is the hardest — on-the-go sandwiches are off limits, as are the amazing pastel de nata tarts, though gluten free versions have popped up around town.

I found that the country’s grocery items were clearly marked for celiacs — a sticker applied to packaging states that it is gluten-free. Companies are also required by law to disclose any allergen, including wheat, rye, barley, or oats, and these are identified in bold on the ingredient list. Where they are gluten free, in Portuguese they would often say isento de glúten.

For eating out, many menus of the day (larger lunchtime meals) include a simple grilled main with roasted potatoes, vegetables, and rice. These were almost always safe. Check the list of foods below, and bring the gluten free card with you, to double check. Grilled chicken and piri-piri chicken was almost always safe, unless made using a marinade or broth that had wheat. I did not have any trouble with this in Portugal, though I have at Portuguese restaurants abroad.

THIS POST WAS LAST UPDATED: JANUARY 2021


The Essential Gluten Free Guide to Portugal

I spent several months in Portugal, one in Lisbon and the rest on the island of Madeira. I traveled there initially to speak at a food conference I stayed because I did not want to stop eating with friends. From fresh seafood to perfectly steamed vegetables to satisfying soups, the country left my taste buds hankering for more. This gluten free Portugal guide shares some of what was safe, what was off limits, and the lessons I learned in the process the hard way — I’m looking at you, yellow mustard.

Portugal’s emphasis on quality ingredients as the building blocks of their meals made it easy to find food safely. As with many countries, snack time is the hardest — on-the-go sandwiches are off limits, as are the amazing pastel de nata tarts, though gluten free versions have popped up around town.

I found that the country’s grocery items were clearly marked for celiacs — a sticker applied to packaging states that it is gluten-free. Companies are also required by law to disclose any allergen, including wheat, rye, barley, or oats, and these are identified in bold on the ingredient list. Where they are gluten free, in Portuguese they would often say isento de glúten.

For eating out, many menus of the day (larger lunchtime meals) include a simple grilled main with roasted potatoes, vegetables, and rice. These were almost always safe. Check the list of foods below, and bring the gluten free card with you, to double check. Grilled chicken and piri-piri chicken was almost always safe, unless made using a marinade or broth that had wheat. I did not have any trouble with this in Portugal, though I have at Portuguese restaurants abroad.

THIS POST WAS LAST UPDATED: JANUARY 2021


The Essential Gluten Free Guide to Portugal

I spent several months in Portugal, one in Lisbon and the rest on the island of Madeira. I traveled there initially to speak at a food conference I stayed because I did not want to stop eating with friends. From fresh seafood to perfectly steamed vegetables to satisfying soups, the country left my taste buds hankering for more. This gluten free Portugal guide shares some of what was safe, what was off limits, and the lessons I learned in the process the hard way — I’m looking at you, yellow mustard.

Portugal’s emphasis on quality ingredients as the building blocks of their meals made it easy to find food safely. As with many countries, snack time is the hardest — on-the-go sandwiches are off limits, as are the amazing pastel de nata tarts, though gluten free versions have popped up around town.

I found that the country’s grocery items were clearly marked for celiacs — a sticker applied to packaging states that it is gluten-free. Companies are also required by law to disclose any allergen, including wheat, rye, barley, or oats, and these are identified in bold on the ingredient list. Where they are gluten free, in Portuguese they would often say isento de glúten.

For eating out, many menus of the day (larger lunchtime meals) include a simple grilled main with roasted potatoes, vegetables, and rice. These were almost always safe. Check the list of foods below, and bring the gluten free card with you, to double check. Grilled chicken and piri-piri chicken was almost always safe, unless made using a marinade or broth that had wheat. I did not have any trouble with this in Portugal, though I have at Portuguese restaurants abroad.

THIS POST WAS LAST UPDATED: JANUARY 2021



Comments:

  1. Apsel

    Great answer, bravo :)

  2. Stanciyf

    You won't do it.

  3. Pius

    I have a similar situation. Let's discuss.

  4. Lyndon

    Yes all this imaginary

  5. Everly

    You have hit the spot. I think this is a very great idea. I completely agree with you.



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