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Free Carvel Ice Cream Day Is a Holiday We All ‘Scream’ About

Free Carvel Ice Cream Day Is a Holiday We All ‘Scream’ About


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Get your free Carvel ice cream cone filled with chocolate, vanilla, or Nutella soft serve on April 30

Honestly, who doesn’t love free ice cream?

Kick off the start of ice cream season with free soft serve ice cream from Carvel. at participating Carvel locations.

Perhaps just as important as free ice cream is the cause Free Cone Day supports: the American Red Cross. Carvel will be selling a $2 coupon book on April 30 that’s filled with $20 worth of savings. All proceeds go toward a $20,000 donation for the Red Cross disaster relief fund. Of course, this is especially helpful in light of the recent Nepal earthquake that has already claimed thousands of lives.

“Free Cone Day is always an exciting time but this year is extra special because guests can try our wildly popular soft ice cream made with Nutella, absolutely free,” said Carvel president Scott Colwell. “We hope everyone visits their nearest participating Carvel shop to enjoy our delicious ice cream and help us support the American Red Cross.”

Free Nutella ice cream for a good cause? We give it two thumbs way, way up.


National Ice Cream Day means free cones. Here's what to know about everyone's favorite frozen treat

Americans will have an excuse Sunday to dig into their favorite flavors of ice cream, as the country celebrates National Ice Cream Day.

We've got the scoop on all your biggest ice cream-related questions, including where to score a free cone.

Where did ice cream come from?

Our love for ice cream goes way, way back. Thousands of years ago, people around the world figured out that cold + sweet = a delicious combo.

Records show that some of history's most famous leaders enjoyed cold treats , from Roman Emperor Nero to Alexander the Great. Even King Solomon was fond of "a snow-cooled drink at harvest time," according to some Bible translations .

Historians believe the ancient Chinese were the first to develop a cool, creamy treat that resembles the ice cream we enjoy today. In the 1500's, ice cream started to spread through Europe, though at first only rich aristocrats could afford it.

No one knows for sure when ice cream made its way to the US, but at least a few founding fathers were fans.

Thomas Jefferson wrote down 18-step instructions for a special ice cream concoction, which is the first known ice cream recipe recorded by an American. And George Washington reportedly dished out $200 in a single summer to get his frosty fix. In today's dollars, that's a lot of money.

Did Prohibition really boost ice cream sales?

It's true. When Prohibition laws banned alcohol sales, Americans turned to ice cream as a fun -- less boozy -- alternative.

The timing couldn't have been more perfect, as new technologies made it easier than ever to manufacture and cool ice cream.

As a result, ice cream's popularity soared in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Frosty ice cream was enjoyed by all types of people throughout the country. In fact, it was served to new immigrants on Ellis Island and even US soldiers during World War II.

When did the US create National Ice Cream Day?

Thanks to President Ronald Reagan, National Ice Cream Day is a legit holiday.

In 1984, he signed a proclamation that declared July to be National Ice Cream Month. The third Sunday of that month, which this year falls on July 21, became officially known as National Ice Cream Day.

The proclamation -- number 5219 , to be exact -- describes ice cream as "a nutritious and wholesome food, enjoyed by over 90 percent of the people in the United States."

Although we can't vouch for his stats, it does sound pretty accurate. Right?

How much ice cream do Americans consume?

Today, the average American consumes more than 20 pounds of ice cream each year, according to the International Dairy Foods Association.

If you think that's a lot of ice cream, multiply it by 329 million Americans.

What's the most popular flavor of ice cream in the US?

From Neapolitan to chocolate chip cookie dough, there's no shortage of ice cream flavors.

That's not all. You can get your ice cream nitrogen-blasted, hand-rolled or charcoal-infused.

Ice cream can even be made without the help of cows. Biotech company Perfect Day debuted a lab-grown dairy ice cream that uses genetic engineering to recreate the proteins usually found in cow's milk.

Still, the top flavor in the US? Plain old vanilla, according to the International Dairy Foods Association .

Where can I score some sweet deals this weekend?

On Sunday, ice cream lovers can scoop up BOGO deals at Carvel, CREAM and Godiva stores nationwide.

Baskin-Robbins and Cold Stone Creamery will also give out free or discounted cones to shoppers who download their mobile apps.

For those who want to enjoy ice cream in the comfort of their own homes, delivery app goPuff will include a free pint of Ben and Jerry's for orders of at least $20.

Not into ice cream? Nekter Juice Bar and Yogurtland are offering BOGO deals on their ice cream-adjacent frozen desserts.

Even your four-legged friends can join in the fun: PetSmart is offering free servings of dog-friendly ice cream, complete with a biscuit on top.

So this weekend, don't think of your sweet tooth as a guilty pleasure, but as a patriotic duty. (Just please, keep your tongues to your own desserts.)


National Ice Cream Day means free cones. Here's what to know about everyone's favorite frozen treat

Americans will have an excuse Sunday to dig into their favorite flavors of ice cream, as the country celebrates National Ice Cream Day.

We've got the scoop on all your biggest ice cream-related questions, including where to score a free cone.

Where did ice cream come from?

Our love for ice cream goes way, way back. Thousands of years ago, people around the world figured out that cold + sweet = a delicious combo.

Records show that some of history's most famous leaders enjoyed cold treats , from Roman Emperor Nero to Alexander the Great. Even King Solomon was fond of "a snow-cooled drink at harvest time," according to some Bible translations .

Historians believe the ancient Chinese were the first to develop a cool, creamy treat that resembles the ice cream we enjoy today. In the 1500's, ice cream started to spread through Europe, though at first only rich aristocrats could afford it.

No one knows for sure when ice cream made its way to the US, but at least a few founding fathers were fans.

Thomas Jefferson wrote down 18-step instructions for a special ice cream concoction, which is the first known ice cream recipe recorded by an American. And George Washington reportedly dished out $200 in a single summer to get his frosty fix. In today's dollars, that's a lot of money.

Did Prohibition really boost ice cream sales?

It's true. When Prohibition laws banned alcohol sales, Americans turned to ice cream as a fun -- less boozy -- alternative.

The timing couldn't have been more perfect, as new technologies made it easier than ever to manufacture and cool ice cream.

As a result, ice cream's popularity soared in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Frosty ice cream was enjoyed by all types of people throughout the country. In fact, it was served to new immigrants on Ellis Island and even US soldiers during World War II.

When did the US create National Ice Cream Day?

Thanks to President Ronald Reagan, National Ice Cream Day is a legit holiday.

In 1984, he signed a proclamation that declared July to be National Ice Cream Month. The third Sunday of that month, which this year falls on July 21, became officially known as National Ice Cream Day.

The proclamation -- number 5219 , to be exact -- describes ice cream as "a nutritious and wholesome food, enjoyed by over 90 percent of the people in the United States."

Although we can't vouch for his stats, it does sound pretty accurate. Right?

How much ice cream do Americans consume?

Today, the average American consumes more than 20 pounds of ice cream each year, according to the International Dairy Foods Association.

If you think that's a lot of ice cream, multiply it by 329 million Americans.

What's the most popular flavor of ice cream in the US?

From Neapolitan to chocolate chip cookie dough, there's no shortage of ice cream flavors.

That's not all. You can get your ice cream nitrogen-blasted, hand-rolled or charcoal-infused.

Ice cream can even be made without the help of cows. Biotech company Perfect Day debuted a lab-grown dairy ice cream that uses genetic engineering to recreate the proteins usually found in cow's milk.

Still, the top flavor in the US? Plain old vanilla, according to the International Dairy Foods Association .

Where can I score some sweet deals this weekend?

On Sunday, ice cream lovers can scoop up BOGO deals at Carvel, CREAM and Godiva stores nationwide.

Baskin-Robbins and Cold Stone Creamery will also give out free or discounted cones to shoppers who download their mobile apps.

For those who want to enjoy ice cream in the comfort of their own homes, delivery app goPuff will include a free pint of Ben and Jerry's for orders of at least $20.

Not into ice cream? Nekter Juice Bar and Yogurtland are offering BOGO deals on their ice cream-adjacent frozen desserts.

Even your four-legged friends can join in the fun: PetSmart is offering free servings of dog-friendly ice cream, complete with a biscuit on top.

So this weekend, don't think of your sweet tooth as a guilty pleasure, but as a patriotic duty. (Just please, keep your tongues to your own desserts.)


National Ice Cream Day means free cones. Here's what to know about everyone's favorite frozen treat

Americans will have an excuse Sunday to dig into their favorite flavors of ice cream, as the country celebrates National Ice Cream Day.

We've got the scoop on all your biggest ice cream-related questions, including where to score a free cone.

Where did ice cream come from?

Our love for ice cream goes way, way back. Thousands of years ago, people around the world figured out that cold + sweet = a delicious combo.

Records show that some of history's most famous leaders enjoyed cold treats , from Roman Emperor Nero to Alexander the Great. Even King Solomon was fond of "a snow-cooled drink at harvest time," according to some Bible translations .

Historians believe the ancient Chinese were the first to develop a cool, creamy treat that resembles the ice cream we enjoy today. In the 1500's, ice cream started to spread through Europe, though at first only rich aristocrats could afford it.

No one knows for sure when ice cream made its way to the US, but at least a few founding fathers were fans.

Thomas Jefferson wrote down 18-step instructions for a special ice cream concoction, which is the first known ice cream recipe recorded by an American. And George Washington reportedly dished out $200 in a single summer to get his frosty fix. In today's dollars, that's a lot of money.

Did Prohibition really boost ice cream sales?

It's true. When Prohibition laws banned alcohol sales, Americans turned to ice cream as a fun -- less boozy -- alternative.

The timing couldn't have been more perfect, as new technologies made it easier than ever to manufacture and cool ice cream.

As a result, ice cream's popularity soared in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Frosty ice cream was enjoyed by all types of people throughout the country. In fact, it was served to new immigrants on Ellis Island and even US soldiers during World War II.

When did the US create National Ice Cream Day?

Thanks to President Ronald Reagan, National Ice Cream Day is a legit holiday.

In 1984, he signed a proclamation that declared July to be National Ice Cream Month. The third Sunday of that month, which this year falls on July 21, became officially known as National Ice Cream Day.

The proclamation -- number 5219 , to be exact -- describes ice cream as "a nutritious and wholesome food, enjoyed by over 90 percent of the people in the United States."

Although we can't vouch for his stats, it does sound pretty accurate. Right?

How much ice cream do Americans consume?

Today, the average American consumes more than 20 pounds of ice cream each year, according to the International Dairy Foods Association.

If you think that's a lot of ice cream, multiply it by 329 million Americans.

What's the most popular flavor of ice cream in the US?

From Neapolitan to chocolate chip cookie dough, there's no shortage of ice cream flavors.

That's not all. You can get your ice cream nitrogen-blasted, hand-rolled or charcoal-infused.

Ice cream can even be made without the help of cows. Biotech company Perfect Day debuted a lab-grown dairy ice cream that uses genetic engineering to recreate the proteins usually found in cow's milk.

Still, the top flavor in the US? Plain old vanilla, according to the International Dairy Foods Association .

Where can I score some sweet deals this weekend?

On Sunday, ice cream lovers can scoop up BOGO deals at Carvel, CREAM and Godiva stores nationwide.

Baskin-Robbins and Cold Stone Creamery will also give out free or discounted cones to shoppers who download their mobile apps.

For those who want to enjoy ice cream in the comfort of their own homes, delivery app goPuff will include a free pint of Ben and Jerry's for orders of at least $20.

Not into ice cream? Nekter Juice Bar and Yogurtland are offering BOGO deals on their ice cream-adjacent frozen desserts.

Even your four-legged friends can join in the fun: PetSmart is offering free servings of dog-friendly ice cream, complete with a biscuit on top.

So this weekend, don't think of your sweet tooth as a guilty pleasure, but as a patriotic duty. (Just please, keep your tongues to your own desserts.)


There’s no known inventor that can be credited with creating ice cream unfortunately. But the history of ice cream is as rich as gelato. It’s been said that an ice cream like food was first consumed in China sometime between 618-97 AD. The first dish was made from flour, buffalo milk and camphor, an organic compound commonly used in lotion. It’s also been noted that Alexander the Great adored ice and snow flavoured with nectar and honey.

We’ve also identified that the Bible indicates that King Solomon enjoyed iced drinks during the harvest season. Speaking of homemade, during the Roman Empire, Caesar would send people to gather snow from the mountains, just to cover it in fruit and juices.

Close to a thousand years later in Italy, Marco Polo had returned from the Far East and bought back a recipe for what we now know as sherbet. It is assumed that this recipe developed into what we now know as ice cream which was once called ‘‘Cream Ice.’ It was in 1660 that the general public was presented with ice cream. An Italian man named Francesco Procopio Dei Coltelli decided to perfect a machine made by his fisherman grandfather which produced top-quality gelato in his café. The recipe blended milk, butter, eggs and cream and was sold in Paris.

The first mention of ice cream in the United States derives from a letter written in Maryland in 1744 by Governor William Bladen’s guest. Then, the New York Gazette on May 12, 1777 printed the first advert for ice cream in the United States. Following the American Revolution, ice cream became super popular in the US.

Since then ice cream has exploded onto the desert scene with the creation of home machines, as well as the emergence of ice cream vans, ice cream floats, sundaes and well-known brands like ‘‘Ben and Jerry’s’’ and ‘‘Haagen-Dazs’’ that we still consume to this day. The effect of ice cream on society is so great, that the brain of an ice cream lover has been likened to that of an addict. When the brain wants ice cream, it reacts like a passionate fanatic.


We couldn&apost forget about your furry friend, especially during the dog days of summer. Just before the holiday, PetSmart is hosting pop-up ice-cream socials for dogs and their owners on Wednesday, July 12. Unfortunately, the only place in the South where you can find these ice cream trucks is in Dallas, Texas. But you can also visit any PetSmart PetsHotel locations on July 16, and Fido will receive a free, tail-wag worthy Doggie Ice Cream Sundae, topped with dog biscuit sprinkles.

Blizzard Fan Club members will be treated to an ice cream coupon for a BOGO Free Blizzard to redeem on National Ice Cream Day.


National Ice Cream Day is upon us, and here's where to get free treats

Unbeknownst to some, the third Sunday of every July is National Ice Cream Day — a holiday declared by President Ronald Reagan back in 1984 to promote the economic well-being of the U.S. dairy industry. It was a nod to the fact that the frozen treat is produced using nearly 10 percent of U.S. dairy farmers' milk supply.

Reagan's proclamation also called on the people of the United States to do their duty and pay tribute to ice cream with "appropriate ceremonies and activities." So who are we to argue?

Here are some of the events and activities for people — and pets — taking place this year on Sunday, July 17, and in some cases beyond.

At Carvel Ice Cream franchises around the country, customers who buy one cup or cone of any size will get one free on National Ice Cream Day. The soft-serve ice-cream company also has a promotion underway for buy one, get one free sundaes each Wednesday.

Pets get to participate in the ice cream-palooza this year, thanks to PetSmart, which is giving away doggie ice cream sundaes at all of its PetSmart PetsHotel locations in the U.S. and Canada on Sunday . The sundaes, which are made with dog-safe vanilla soft serve and have dog biscuits sprinkled on top, are usually an add-on service treat.

At Your Pie pizza chain locations around the country, Ice Cream Day will instead be Free Gelato Day . Your Pie is also having a contest to give away free gelato twice a week for the rest of the year. To enter, just snap a photo of yourself enjoying your free gelato, post it to Instagram, Twitter or Facebook, and add a #ypfreegelato tag.

Some places are celebrating the occasion by doing something a little different.

In Arlington, Virginia, the New District Brewing Company is hosting a beer and ice-cream tasting that pairs four beers with four appropriately matched flavors of Ben & Jerry's ice cream. Tickets are $20.50 plus a ticket fee.

In New York City, Haagen-Dazs will be giving away free ice cream on July 17 at the weekly curated market Grand Bazaar NYC . Also, the market is hosting an Ice Cream Blizzard on Sunday, July 31, with many of the city's best artisanal ice cream makers scheduled to be on site.

This Sunday, Baskin-Robbins shops will be donating 75 cents from every ice cream float sold to the USO in honor of the USO's 75th anniversary. And on July 31, as part a year-long "Celebrate 31" promotion that kicks in during months with 31 days, participating Baskin-Robbins will be offering regular and kid-size scoops of ice cream for $1.31 each.


National Ice Cream Day 2019: Here’s where you can get free ice cream on Sunday

NEW YORK — I scream, you scream. We all scream for (free) ice cream!

In 1984, President Ronald Reagan designated the third Sunday of July as National Ice Cream Day. This year, it falls on July 21 st !

To celebrate, tons of locations around New York City and the tri-state area are offering free, discounts or specials on their ice cream.

These locations are offering free ice cream or sweet deals for National Ice Cream Day:

Baskin Robbins – Download Baskin-Robbins’ mobile app. Special offers for National Ice Cream Day include buy-one-get-one free cones and $2 off medium milk shakes.

Carvel – Ice cream fans can head over to their local Carvel for buy-one-get-one free cups or cones of soft serve ice cream.

Cold Stone Creamery – Join their eClub to get BOGO ice cream. They’re also offering a free $10 bonus eGift for every $30in Cold Stone Creamery gift cards.

Dairy Queen – During the entire month of July, Dairy Queen is offering a free blizzard with the download of their new mobile app.

Dippin’ Dots – Free mini cups of Dippin’ Dots ice cream will be given out during a two-hour window. Find your local store here.

Dylan’s Candy Bar- Head into your nearest Dylan’s Candy Bar café from 2-4 p.m. and mention “National Ice Cream Day” at the counter for one free scoop of ice cream. (Offer only available at the following locations: 3rd Ave NYC, Union Square NYC, Hudson Yards NYC, Madame Tussaud’s NYC, Miami, Los Angeles, and East Hampton.

Godiva – Buy one soft serve cup or cone and parfaits and get 50% off the second at participating locations.

Milk and Cream Cereal Bar – The first 50 customers get free ice cream. (starts at noon)

Nutella Cafe – The first 50 customers to arrive from 3 – 5 p.m. will get one free frozen Nutella pop coated in hazelnuts. If you’re not one of the first 50, they’re also offering a free scoop of any gelato flavor until 5 p.m.

PetSmart – Your pup can get in on the fun as PetSmart is celebrating all weekend long by offering free, dog-friendly ice cream at PetSmart PetsHotel locations. During store hours on Saturday and Sunday, all dogs will be served a complimentary frozen treat. Visit here to find a nearby location.

Yogurtland – Celebrate this sweet holiday with Yogurtland’s BOGO sale of buy one get one free on Sunday. Visit here to find their locations.

My/Mo Mochi Ice Cream – My/Mo Mochi Ice Cream, who is teaming up with clothing brand UNIQLO will offer free ice cream on Sunday at 666 5 th Ave. and 546 Broadway. My/Mo Mochi flavors like mango, strawberry and blueberry vanilla will be offered from 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Whole Foods Market: Through July 30, Prime members get 35% off all ice cream and novelties.

Wowfulls – Chill out with family and friends on the Lower East Side this Sunday at Wowfulls National Ice Cream Day Event. The first 50 visitors can grab a scoop for $1. The event is 12-5 p.m. at 309 East Houston Street.

16 Handles – Visit 16 Handles and get 3 oz of FREE soft serve until 5pm. Just download the 16 Handles app and scan the QR code at the register.


Where to score free and cheap treats (for you and your pet) on National Ice Cream Day

When it comes to food holidays, Popeye might be the only one excited by Fresh Spinach Day on July 16. However, everyone else will likely flock to their nearest shop for National Ice Cream Day, which falls on July 15.

Come Sunday, there will be plenty of opportunities for people – and pets – to score free frozen treats, and deals on ice cream. The third Sunday of every July is National Ice Cream Day — a holiday declared by President Ronald Reagan back in 1984 to promote the U.S. dairy industry.

Some of the free offers and events planned include desert icon Carvel, which will offer a buy one-get one (BOGO) free deal on any size soft ice cream cup or cone.

Dippin’ Dots is celebrating its 30 th anniversary on National Ice Cream Day. It will give away prizes, and free mini cups of Dippin’ Dots during a two-hour window at participating locations.

Ice-cream fans who download the Baskin-Robbins Mobile App will get special offers for use only on National Ice Cream Day, including a BOGO cone offer for 99-cent sundaes, and $2 off a medium milkshake. To cap off National Ice Cream Month, on Tuesday, July 31, all regular and kid-sized ice scream scoops will be $1.50.

For the fourth year running, participating Your Pie fast-casual pizza locations around the country will offer customers a fee scoop of Italian gelato on Sunday. (Use the hashtag #ypfreegelato to share your gelato experience for a chance to win free gelato for a whole year.)


Here's Where You Can Get FREE Ice Cream On National Ice Cream Day

Per Nielsen Data, ice cream category sales have hit $6.2 billion in the U.S. in the latest 52 weeks (up 2.2% from last year), which basically confirms the universal truth: We do, indeed, all scream for ice cream. On National Ice Cream Day, Sunday, July 15, we can all celebrate the very important holiday with discounted and (free!!) ice cream. Here's where you can find the best deals on your favorite summer sweet treat.


Watch the video: I Scream, You Scream, We All Scream For Ice Cream!


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