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100-Year-Old Woman Credits Long Life to Daily Bottle of Guinness

100-Year-Old Woman Credits Long Life to Daily Bottle of Guinness


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Guinness may have ditched its 1920s-era slogan, “Guinness Is Good for You,” but the message stuck with Doris Olive Netting. The 100-year-old woman from Plymouth, England credits her longevity to her daily drink of the beer — a ritual she’s kept up since she began drinking it in her 30s.

“She refuses to go a day without drinking it,” her 37-year-old granddaughter Tammy told the Herald. “She reckons that's why she's lived for as long as she has, because of the iron intake through Guinness.”

Netting allegedly saw one of the aforementioned advertisements touting the iron content of Guinness — one of the reasons it’s rumored to be one of the healthiest popular beers. The marketing campaign worked wonders on Netting, entrancing her into a love of the Irish stout that’s lasted her entire life.

“After the war there was a big marketing campaign to buy Guinness — drink Guinness to get your iron — following on from the ration years,” Tammy relayed. “So Olive did just that: a glass [mini bottle] of Guinness a day for the rest of her life.”

For her 100th birthday party, Olive Netting celebrated her century-long life with a Guinness-themed birthday party, complete with black Guinness-branded balloons, a life-sized model of the Guinness toucan logo, and (of course) multiple bottles of Guinness. The centenarian also received a telegraph from the Queen — though she may have been considerably more excited when Guinness, upon hearing her story, sent a personalized gift basket to commemorate the occasion.

Of course, it’s not just iron that Netting consumes every time she opens a bottle — for someone with middle-aged grandchildren, Olive drinks a heck of a lot of booze. Some previous research has suggested that drinking too much could significantly shorten your life — though Netting doesn’t seem worried.

Guinness does make a non-alcoholic beer now, but Netting shows no signs of switching. With her one small bottle a day, she is, after all, the queen of moderation. Perhaps her success with the stout was enough to convince her that those supposed dangers are just scary facts about alcohol that aren’t true.


100-Year-Old Woman Says Beer and Chips are Her Secret to Longevity

Matilda Curcia isn't the only centenarian to credit alcohol for a longer-than-average life.

Society is constantly studying and debating which foods will help humans live the longest, especially the foods we love. Does wine keep your brain healthy? Will coffee extend your lifespan? Can chocolate really make you smarter? Some science speculates it&aposs possible, but no one can really say for sure. There are, of course, the anecdotes of our elders. If we choose to believe them, these stories may hold some good news. Take the case of 100-year-old Matilda Curcia, who has a very specific recipe for long life.

Curcia, who lives in San Francisco, says that she has one beer and three potato chips every night before bed. She credits this nightly routine with her long life.

"I have no pain and do my exercises every day. And have my beer. Eat my potato chips. That&aposs about all,” she told NBC San Diego.

Folks who have lived for a hundred years or more consistently report that alcohol is part of the reason they’ve reached the landmark age. Florence Bearse, from Maine, turned 100 last year. She loves wine, and say it’s the reason that she’s lived so long. 105-year-old Jack Reynolds credits whiskey, which he drinks in his tea every morning and in lemonade in the evening. Not a bad way to retire.

There is some science to back up the claims that drinking will extend your life: One study found that drinking in moderation𠅏rom two or four drinks in a night�n actually lower your chance of heart attack and stroke. The occasional glass of wine with dinner may protect your heart, but you should be careful to not overindulge, which can have negative consequences in the long term.

Will any of these strategies work for you? There’s always a chance, but more realistically, there’s probably no secret snack or cocktail combination that will help you reach your centennial. Still, there’s no harm in trying out all your favorite foods, just in case.


100-Year-Old Woman Says Beer and Chips are Her Secret to Longevity

Matilda Curcia isn't the only centenarian to credit alcohol for a longer-than-average life.

Society is constantly studying and debating which foods will help humans live the longest, especially the foods we love. Does wine keep your brain healthy? Will coffee extend your lifespan? Can chocolate really make you smarter? Some science speculates it&aposs possible, but no one can really say for sure. There are, of course, the anecdotes of our elders. If we choose to believe them, these stories may hold some good news. Take the case of 100-year-old Matilda Curcia, who has a very specific recipe for long life.

Curcia, who lives in San Francisco, says that she has one beer and three potato chips every night before bed. She credits this nightly routine with her long life.

"I have no pain and do my exercises every day. And have my beer. Eat my potato chips. That&aposs about all,” she told NBC San Diego.

Folks who have lived for a hundred years or more consistently report that alcohol is part of the reason they’ve reached the landmark age. Florence Bearse, from Maine, turned 100 last year. She loves wine, and say it’s the reason that she’s lived so long. 105-year-old Jack Reynolds credits whiskey, which he drinks in his tea every morning and in lemonade in the evening. Not a bad way to retire.

There is some science to back up the claims that drinking will extend your life: One study found that drinking in moderation𠅏rom two or four drinks in a night�n actually lower your chance of heart attack and stroke. The occasional glass of wine with dinner may protect your heart, but you should be careful to not overindulge, which can have negative consequences in the long term.

Will any of these strategies work for you? There’s always a chance, but more realistically, there’s probably no secret snack or cocktail combination that will help you reach your centennial. Still, there’s no harm in trying out all your favorite foods, just in case.


100-Year-Old Woman Says Beer and Chips are Her Secret to Longevity

Matilda Curcia isn't the only centenarian to credit alcohol for a longer-than-average life.

Society is constantly studying and debating which foods will help humans live the longest, especially the foods we love. Does wine keep your brain healthy? Will coffee extend your lifespan? Can chocolate really make you smarter? Some science speculates it&aposs possible, but no one can really say for sure. There are, of course, the anecdotes of our elders. If we choose to believe them, these stories may hold some good news. Take the case of 100-year-old Matilda Curcia, who has a very specific recipe for long life.

Curcia, who lives in San Francisco, says that she has one beer and three potato chips every night before bed. She credits this nightly routine with her long life.

"I have no pain and do my exercises every day. And have my beer. Eat my potato chips. That&aposs about all,” she told NBC San Diego.

Folks who have lived for a hundred years or more consistently report that alcohol is part of the reason they’ve reached the landmark age. Florence Bearse, from Maine, turned 100 last year. She loves wine, and say it’s the reason that she’s lived so long. 105-year-old Jack Reynolds credits whiskey, which he drinks in his tea every morning and in lemonade in the evening. Not a bad way to retire.

There is some science to back up the claims that drinking will extend your life: One study found that drinking in moderation𠅏rom two or four drinks in a night�n actually lower your chance of heart attack and stroke. The occasional glass of wine with dinner may protect your heart, but you should be careful to not overindulge, which can have negative consequences in the long term.

Will any of these strategies work for you? There’s always a chance, but more realistically, there’s probably no secret snack or cocktail combination that will help you reach your centennial. Still, there’s no harm in trying out all your favorite foods, just in case.


100-Year-Old Woman Says Beer and Chips are Her Secret to Longevity

Matilda Curcia isn't the only centenarian to credit alcohol for a longer-than-average life.

Society is constantly studying and debating which foods will help humans live the longest, especially the foods we love. Does wine keep your brain healthy? Will coffee extend your lifespan? Can chocolate really make you smarter? Some science speculates it&aposs possible, but no one can really say for sure. There are, of course, the anecdotes of our elders. If we choose to believe them, these stories may hold some good news. Take the case of 100-year-old Matilda Curcia, who has a very specific recipe for long life.

Curcia, who lives in San Francisco, says that she has one beer and three potato chips every night before bed. She credits this nightly routine with her long life.

"I have no pain and do my exercises every day. And have my beer. Eat my potato chips. That&aposs about all,” she told NBC San Diego.

Folks who have lived for a hundred years or more consistently report that alcohol is part of the reason they’ve reached the landmark age. Florence Bearse, from Maine, turned 100 last year. She loves wine, and say it’s the reason that she’s lived so long. 105-year-old Jack Reynolds credits whiskey, which he drinks in his tea every morning and in lemonade in the evening. Not a bad way to retire.

There is some science to back up the claims that drinking will extend your life: One study found that drinking in moderation𠅏rom two or four drinks in a night�n actually lower your chance of heart attack and stroke. The occasional glass of wine with dinner may protect your heart, but you should be careful to not overindulge, which can have negative consequences in the long term.

Will any of these strategies work for you? There’s always a chance, but more realistically, there’s probably no secret snack or cocktail combination that will help you reach your centennial. Still, there’s no harm in trying out all your favorite foods, just in case.


100-Year-Old Woman Says Beer and Chips are Her Secret to Longevity

Matilda Curcia isn't the only centenarian to credit alcohol for a longer-than-average life.

Society is constantly studying and debating which foods will help humans live the longest, especially the foods we love. Does wine keep your brain healthy? Will coffee extend your lifespan? Can chocolate really make you smarter? Some science speculates it&aposs possible, but no one can really say for sure. There are, of course, the anecdotes of our elders. If we choose to believe them, these stories may hold some good news. Take the case of 100-year-old Matilda Curcia, who has a very specific recipe for long life.

Curcia, who lives in San Francisco, says that she has one beer and three potato chips every night before bed. She credits this nightly routine with her long life.

"I have no pain and do my exercises every day. And have my beer. Eat my potato chips. That&aposs about all,” she told NBC San Diego.

Folks who have lived for a hundred years or more consistently report that alcohol is part of the reason they’ve reached the landmark age. Florence Bearse, from Maine, turned 100 last year. She loves wine, and say it’s the reason that she’s lived so long. 105-year-old Jack Reynolds credits whiskey, which he drinks in his tea every morning and in lemonade in the evening. Not a bad way to retire.

There is some science to back up the claims that drinking will extend your life: One study found that drinking in moderation𠅏rom two or four drinks in a night�n actually lower your chance of heart attack and stroke. The occasional glass of wine with dinner may protect your heart, but you should be careful to not overindulge, which can have negative consequences in the long term.

Will any of these strategies work for you? There’s always a chance, but more realistically, there’s probably no secret snack or cocktail combination that will help you reach your centennial. Still, there’s no harm in trying out all your favorite foods, just in case.


100-Year-Old Woman Says Beer and Chips are Her Secret to Longevity

Matilda Curcia isn't the only centenarian to credit alcohol for a longer-than-average life.

Society is constantly studying and debating which foods will help humans live the longest, especially the foods we love. Does wine keep your brain healthy? Will coffee extend your lifespan? Can chocolate really make you smarter? Some science speculates it&aposs possible, but no one can really say for sure. There are, of course, the anecdotes of our elders. If we choose to believe them, these stories may hold some good news. Take the case of 100-year-old Matilda Curcia, who has a very specific recipe for long life.

Curcia, who lives in San Francisco, says that she has one beer and three potato chips every night before bed. She credits this nightly routine with her long life.

"I have no pain and do my exercises every day. And have my beer. Eat my potato chips. That&aposs about all,” she told NBC San Diego.

Folks who have lived for a hundred years or more consistently report that alcohol is part of the reason they’ve reached the landmark age. Florence Bearse, from Maine, turned 100 last year. She loves wine, and say it’s the reason that she’s lived so long. 105-year-old Jack Reynolds credits whiskey, which he drinks in his tea every morning and in lemonade in the evening. Not a bad way to retire.

There is some science to back up the claims that drinking will extend your life: One study found that drinking in moderation𠅏rom two or four drinks in a night�n actually lower your chance of heart attack and stroke. The occasional glass of wine with dinner may protect your heart, but you should be careful to not overindulge, which can have negative consequences in the long term.

Will any of these strategies work for you? There’s always a chance, but more realistically, there’s probably no secret snack or cocktail combination that will help you reach your centennial. Still, there’s no harm in trying out all your favorite foods, just in case.


100-Year-Old Woman Says Beer and Chips are Her Secret to Longevity

Matilda Curcia isn't the only centenarian to credit alcohol for a longer-than-average life.

Society is constantly studying and debating which foods will help humans live the longest, especially the foods we love. Does wine keep your brain healthy? Will coffee extend your lifespan? Can chocolate really make you smarter? Some science speculates it&aposs possible, but no one can really say for sure. There are, of course, the anecdotes of our elders. If we choose to believe them, these stories may hold some good news. Take the case of 100-year-old Matilda Curcia, who has a very specific recipe for long life.

Curcia, who lives in San Francisco, says that she has one beer and three potato chips every night before bed. She credits this nightly routine with her long life.

"I have no pain and do my exercises every day. And have my beer. Eat my potato chips. That&aposs about all,” she told NBC San Diego.

Folks who have lived for a hundred years or more consistently report that alcohol is part of the reason they’ve reached the landmark age. Florence Bearse, from Maine, turned 100 last year. She loves wine, and say it’s the reason that she’s lived so long. 105-year-old Jack Reynolds credits whiskey, which he drinks in his tea every morning and in lemonade in the evening. Not a bad way to retire.

There is some science to back up the claims that drinking will extend your life: One study found that drinking in moderation𠅏rom two or four drinks in a night�n actually lower your chance of heart attack and stroke. The occasional glass of wine with dinner may protect your heart, but you should be careful to not overindulge, which can have negative consequences in the long term.

Will any of these strategies work for you? There’s always a chance, but more realistically, there’s probably no secret snack or cocktail combination that will help you reach your centennial. Still, there’s no harm in trying out all your favorite foods, just in case.


100-Year-Old Woman Says Beer and Chips are Her Secret to Longevity

Matilda Curcia isn't the only centenarian to credit alcohol for a longer-than-average life.

Society is constantly studying and debating which foods will help humans live the longest, especially the foods we love. Does wine keep your brain healthy? Will coffee extend your lifespan? Can chocolate really make you smarter? Some science speculates it&aposs possible, but no one can really say for sure. There are, of course, the anecdotes of our elders. If we choose to believe them, these stories may hold some good news. Take the case of 100-year-old Matilda Curcia, who has a very specific recipe for long life.

Curcia, who lives in San Francisco, says that she has one beer and three potato chips every night before bed. She credits this nightly routine with her long life.

"I have no pain and do my exercises every day. And have my beer. Eat my potato chips. That&aposs about all,” she told NBC San Diego.

Folks who have lived for a hundred years or more consistently report that alcohol is part of the reason they’ve reached the landmark age. Florence Bearse, from Maine, turned 100 last year. She loves wine, and say it’s the reason that she’s lived so long. 105-year-old Jack Reynolds credits whiskey, which he drinks in his tea every morning and in lemonade in the evening. Not a bad way to retire.

There is some science to back up the claims that drinking will extend your life: One study found that drinking in moderation𠅏rom two or four drinks in a night�n actually lower your chance of heart attack and stroke. The occasional glass of wine with dinner may protect your heart, but you should be careful to not overindulge, which can have negative consequences in the long term.

Will any of these strategies work for you? There’s always a chance, but more realistically, there’s probably no secret snack or cocktail combination that will help you reach your centennial. Still, there’s no harm in trying out all your favorite foods, just in case.


100-Year-Old Woman Says Beer and Chips are Her Secret to Longevity

Matilda Curcia isn't the only centenarian to credit alcohol for a longer-than-average life.

Society is constantly studying and debating which foods will help humans live the longest, especially the foods we love. Does wine keep your brain healthy? Will coffee extend your lifespan? Can chocolate really make you smarter? Some science speculates it&aposs possible, but no one can really say for sure. There are, of course, the anecdotes of our elders. If we choose to believe them, these stories may hold some good news. Take the case of 100-year-old Matilda Curcia, who has a very specific recipe for long life.

Curcia, who lives in San Francisco, says that she has one beer and three potato chips every night before bed. She credits this nightly routine with her long life.

"I have no pain and do my exercises every day. And have my beer. Eat my potato chips. That&aposs about all,” she told NBC San Diego.

Folks who have lived for a hundred years or more consistently report that alcohol is part of the reason they’ve reached the landmark age. Florence Bearse, from Maine, turned 100 last year. She loves wine, and say it’s the reason that she’s lived so long. 105-year-old Jack Reynolds credits whiskey, which he drinks in his tea every morning and in lemonade in the evening. Not a bad way to retire.

There is some science to back up the claims that drinking will extend your life: One study found that drinking in moderation𠅏rom two or four drinks in a night�n actually lower your chance of heart attack and stroke. The occasional glass of wine with dinner may protect your heart, but you should be careful to not overindulge, which can have negative consequences in the long term.

Will any of these strategies work for you? There’s always a chance, but more realistically, there’s probably no secret snack or cocktail combination that will help you reach your centennial. Still, there’s no harm in trying out all your favorite foods, just in case.


100-Year-Old Woman Says Beer and Chips are Her Secret to Longevity

Matilda Curcia isn't the only centenarian to credit alcohol for a longer-than-average life.

Society is constantly studying and debating which foods will help humans live the longest, especially the foods we love. Does wine keep your brain healthy? Will coffee extend your lifespan? Can chocolate really make you smarter? Some science speculates it&aposs possible, but no one can really say for sure. There are, of course, the anecdotes of our elders. If we choose to believe them, these stories may hold some good news. Take the case of 100-year-old Matilda Curcia, who has a very specific recipe for long life.

Curcia, who lives in San Francisco, says that she has one beer and three potato chips every night before bed. She credits this nightly routine with her long life.

"I have no pain and do my exercises every day. And have my beer. Eat my potato chips. That&aposs about all,” she told NBC San Diego.

Folks who have lived for a hundred years or more consistently report that alcohol is part of the reason they’ve reached the landmark age. Florence Bearse, from Maine, turned 100 last year. She loves wine, and say it’s the reason that she’s lived so long. 105-year-old Jack Reynolds credits whiskey, which he drinks in his tea every morning and in lemonade in the evening. Not a bad way to retire.

There is some science to back up the claims that drinking will extend your life: One study found that drinking in moderation𠅏rom two or four drinks in a night�n actually lower your chance of heart attack and stroke. The occasional glass of wine with dinner may protect your heart, but you should be careful to not overindulge, which can have negative consequences in the long term.

Will any of these strategies work for you? There’s always a chance, but more realistically, there’s probably no secret snack or cocktail combination that will help you reach your centennial. Still, there’s no harm in trying out all your favorite foods, just in case.



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