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10 Shocking Facts That Will Make You Wonder If You're Doing Enough to Fight Hunger

10 Shocking Facts That Will Make You Wonder If You're Doing Enough to Fight Hunger


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Even though you may not see it, hunger is everywhere in America, and it's worse than you think

iStockPhoto/Thinkstock

When we think of poverty in America, we tend not to directly associate it with hunger. Food is cheap, right? And if someone’s hungry, there are plenty of resources available to help feed them, right? Well, not so fast. Yes, there are resources available, but there are still millions of Americans who are food insecure.

10 Shocking Facts That Will Make You Wonder If You're Doing Enough to Fight Hunger

iStockPhoto/Thinkstock

When we think of poverty in America, we tend not to directly associate it with hunger. Yes, there are resources available, but there are still millions of Americans who are food insecure.

Food Insecurity Exists in Every County in America

The lowest amount of food insecurity is found in Slope County, North Dakota (four percent), and the highest is in Humphreys County, Mississippi (33 percent).

40 Percent of Food is Thrown Out in the U.S. Every Year

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That’s $165 billion worth of food, or enough to feed 25 million Americans.

16 Million Children are Food Insecure

iStockPhoto/Thinkstock

16.2 million children, or about one out of six American kids, live in households without consistent access to adequate food. And 22 percent of kids under the age of 18 live in poverty.

Eight States are the Most Food Insecure

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Eight states have higher household food insecurity rates than the national average (14.6 percent): Ohio (16 percent), Georgia (16.6 percent), Missouri (16.9 percent), North Carolina (17.3 percent), Tennessee (17.4 percent), Texas (18 percent), Mississippi (21.1 percent), and Arkansas (21.2 percent).

Food Insecurity Affects 20 Percent of Households with Children

20 percent of households with children reported food insecurity, as opposed to just 12 percent of households without children.

25 Percent of Households with Children in Large Cities are Food Insecure

Food insecurity is more common in large cities than rural areas.

59 percent of Food-Insecure Households Participate in Assistance Programs

59 percent of food-insecure households reported that in the previous month they participated in at least one of the three largest federal food and nutrition assistance programs: SNAP, the National School Lunch Program (which provides free or low-cost school lunches), and The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), which supplies food, health care referrals, and nutrition education to mothers-to-be, mothers, and small children.

47 percent of SNAP Participants are Under 18

One in seven Americans is enrolled in SNAP.

The Food-Secure Spend a Lot More on Food than the Food-Insecure

iStockPhoto/Thinkstock

The average family that doesn’t have to worry about where their next meal is coming from spends 27 percent more on food than the median food-insecure household.

90 Percent of SNAP Benefits are Redeemed by the 21st Day of the Benefit Period

iStockPhoto/Thinkstock

This means that SNAP benefits aren’t enough to last recipients for the entire month.


10 Common Misconceptions About the Poor

Fifty years after president Johnson started a $20 trillion tax-payer funded war on poverty, we see little change in the poverty rates in America. A record breaking 47 million Americans rely on food stamps, and the poverty rate has held steady at around 15% for three consecutive years, which hasn’t happened since the 1960’s.

Nearly 50 million Americans live below the poverty line, which the federal government defined in 2012 as earning an annual income of $23,492 for a family of four. With the government and other groups spending billions and, in some cases, trillions of dollars to gain the upper hand in the war on poverty with little-to-no apparent success, Americans begin to wonder, “what is really going on?” or “can we really help them?”

To help answer these questions, and to illuminate some of the more elusive realities of poverty, we have developed this list to explore 10 of the most prevalent misconceptions about the poor in the United States. We will look at each misconception to determine the origins of the incorrect conclusions, and explore alternative explanations. Each misconception was selected due to its prevalence, its level of incorrectness, and its instrumentality in perpetuating biases against the poor.


10 Common Misconceptions About the Poor

Fifty years after president Johnson started a $20 trillion tax-payer funded war on poverty, we see little change in the poverty rates in America. A record breaking 47 million Americans rely on food stamps, and the poverty rate has held steady at around 15% for three consecutive years, which hasn’t happened since the 1960’s.

Nearly 50 million Americans live below the poverty line, which the federal government defined in 2012 as earning an annual income of $23,492 for a family of four. With the government and other groups spending billions and, in some cases, trillions of dollars to gain the upper hand in the war on poverty with little-to-no apparent success, Americans begin to wonder, “what is really going on?” or “can we really help them?”

To help answer these questions, and to illuminate some of the more elusive realities of poverty, we have developed this list to explore 10 of the most prevalent misconceptions about the poor in the United States. We will look at each misconception to determine the origins of the incorrect conclusions, and explore alternative explanations. Each misconception was selected due to its prevalence, its level of incorrectness, and its instrumentality in perpetuating biases against the poor.


10 Common Misconceptions About the Poor

Fifty years after president Johnson started a $20 trillion tax-payer funded war on poverty, we see little change in the poverty rates in America. A record breaking 47 million Americans rely on food stamps, and the poverty rate has held steady at around 15% for three consecutive years, which hasn’t happened since the 1960’s.

Nearly 50 million Americans live below the poverty line, which the federal government defined in 2012 as earning an annual income of $23,492 for a family of four. With the government and other groups spending billions and, in some cases, trillions of dollars to gain the upper hand in the war on poverty with little-to-no apparent success, Americans begin to wonder, “what is really going on?” or “can we really help them?”

To help answer these questions, and to illuminate some of the more elusive realities of poverty, we have developed this list to explore 10 of the most prevalent misconceptions about the poor in the United States. We will look at each misconception to determine the origins of the incorrect conclusions, and explore alternative explanations. Each misconception was selected due to its prevalence, its level of incorrectness, and its instrumentality in perpetuating biases against the poor.


10 Common Misconceptions About the Poor

Fifty years after president Johnson started a $20 trillion tax-payer funded war on poverty, we see little change in the poverty rates in America. A record breaking 47 million Americans rely on food stamps, and the poverty rate has held steady at around 15% for three consecutive years, which hasn’t happened since the 1960’s.

Nearly 50 million Americans live below the poverty line, which the federal government defined in 2012 as earning an annual income of $23,492 for a family of four. With the government and other groups spending billions and, in some cases, trillions of dollars to gain the upper hand in the war on poverty with little-to-no apparent success, Americans begin to wonder, “what is really going on?” or “can we really help them?”

To help answer these questions, and to illuminate some of the more elusive realities of poverty, we have developed this list to explore 10 of the most prevalent misconceptions about the poor in the United States. We will look at each misconception to determine the origins of the incorrect conclusions, and explore alternative explanations. Each misconception was selected due to its prevalence, its level of incorrectness, and its instrumentality in perpetuating biases against the poor.


10 Common Misconceptions About the Poor

Fifty years after president Johnson started a $20 trillion tax-payer funded war on poverty, we see little change in the poverty rates in America. A record breaking 47 million Americans rely on food stamps, and the poverty rate has held steady at around 15% for three consecutive years, which hasn’t happened since the 1960’s.

Nearly 50 million Americans live below the poverty line, which the federal government defined in 2012 as earning an annual income of $23,492 for a family of four. With the government and other groups spending billions and, in some cases, trillions of dollars to gain the upper hand in the war on poverty with little-to-no apparent success, Americans begin to wonder, “what is really going on?” or “can we really help them?”

To help answer these questions, and to illuminate some of the more elusive realities of poverty, we have developed this list to explore 10 of the most prevalent misconceptions about the poor in the United States. We will look at each misconception to determine the origins of the incorrect conclusions, and explore alternative explanations. Each misconception was selected due to its prevalence, its level of incorrectness, and its instrumentality in perpetuating biases against the poor.


10 Common Misconceptions About the Poor

Fifty years after president Johnson started a $20 trillion tax-payer funded war on poverty, we see little change in the poverty rates in America. A record breaking 47 million Americans rely on food stamps, and the poverty rate has held steady at around 15% for three consecutive years, which hasn’t happened since the 1960’s.

Nearly 50 million Americans live below the poverty line, which the federal government defined in 2012 as earning an annual income of $23,492 for a family of four. With the government and other groups spending billions and, in some cases, trillions of dollars to gain the upper hand in the war on poverty with little-to-no apparent success, Americans begin to wonder, “what is really going on?” or “can we really help them?”

To help answer these questions, and to illuminate some of the more elusive realities of poverty, we have developed this list to explore 10 of the most prevalent misconceptions about the poor in the United States. We will look at each misconception to determine the origins of the incorrect conclusions, and explore alternative explanations. Each misconception was selected due to its prevalence, its level of incorrectness, and its instrumentality in perpetuating biases against the poor.


10 Common Misconceptions About the Poor

Fifty years after president Johnson started a $20 trillion tax-payer funded war on poverty, we see little change in the poverty rates in America. A record breaking 47 million Americans rely on food stamps, and the poverty rate has held steady at around 15% for three consecutive years, which hasn’t happened since the 1960’s.

Nearly 50 million Americans live below the poverty line, which the federal government defined in 2012 as earning an annual income of $23,492 for a family of four. With the government and other groups spending billions and, in some cases, trillions of dollars to gain the upper hand in the war on poverty with little-to-no apparent success, Americans begin to wonder, “what is really going on?” or “can we really help them?”

To help answer these questions, and to illuminate some of the more elusive realities of poverty, we have developed this list to explore 10 of the most prevalent misconceptions about the poor in the United States. We will look at each misconception to determine the origins of the incorrect conclusions, and explore alternative explanations. Each misconception was selected due to its prevalence, its level of incorrectness, and its instrumentality in perpetuating biases against the poor.


10 Common Misconceptions About the Poor

Fifty years after president Johnson started a $20 trillion tax-payer funded war on poverty, we see little change in the poverty rates in America. A record breaking 47 million Americans rely on food stamps, and the poverty rate has held steady at around 15% for three consecutive years, which hasn’t happened since the 1960’s.

Nearly 50 million Americans live below the poverty line, which the federal government defined in 2012 as earning an annual income of $23,492 for a family of four. With the government and other groups spending billions and, in some cases, trillions of dollars to gain the upper hand in the war on poverty with little-to-no apparent success, Americans begin to wonder, “what is really going on?” or “can we really help them?”

To help answer these questions, and to illuminate some of the more elusive realities of poverty, we have developed this list to explore 10 of the most prevalent misconceptions about the poor in the United States. We will look at each misconception to determine the origins of the incorrect conclusions, and explore alternative explanations. Each misconception was selected due to its prevalence, its level of incorrectness, and its instrumentality in perpetuating biases against the poor.


10 Common Misconceptions About the Poor

Fifty years after president Johnson started a $20 trillion tax-payer funded war on poverty, we see little change in the poverty rates in America. A record breaking 47 million Americans rely on food stamps, and the poverty rate has held steady at around 15% for three consecutive years, which hasn’t happened since the 1960’s.

Nearly 50 million Americans live below the poverty line, which the federal government defined in 2012 as earning an annual income of $23,492 for a family of four. With the government and other groups spending billions and, in some cases, trillions of dollars to gain the upper hand in the war on poverty with little-to-no apparent success, Americans begin to wonder, “what is really going on?” or “can we really help them?”

To help answer these questions, and to illuminate some of the more elusive realities of poverty, we have developed this list to explore 10 of the most prevalent misconceptions about the poor in the United States. We will look at each misconception to determine the origins of the incorrect conclusions, and explore alternative explanations. Each misconception was selected due to its prevalence, its level of incorrectness, and its instrumentality in perpetuating biases against the poor.


10 Common Misconceptions About the Poor

Fifty years after president Johnson started a $20 trillion tax-payer funded war on poverty, we see little change in the poverty rates in America. A record breaking 47 million Americans rely on food stamps, and the poverty rate has held steady at around 15% for three consecutive years, which hasn’t happened since the 1960’s.

Nearly 50 million Americans live below the poverty line, which the federal government defined in 2012 as earning an annual income of $23,492 for a family of four. With the government and other groups spending billions and, in some cases, trillions of dollars to gain the upper hand in the war on poverty with little-to-no apparent success, Americans begin to wonder, “what is really going on?” or “can we really help them?”

To help answer these questions, and to illuminate some of the more elusive realities of poverty, we have developed this list to explore 10 of the most prevalent misconceptions about the poor in the United States. We will look at each misconception to determine the origins of the incorrect conclusions, and explore alternative explanations. Each misconception was selected due to its prevalence, its level of incorrectness, and its instrumentality in perpetuating biases against the poor.



Comments:

  1. Takinos

    I fully share her point of view. In this nothing in there and I think this is a very good idea.

  2. Scot

    And how in this case to proceed?

  3. Vincenzo

    you the abstract person

  4. Toussnint

    yes, it happens ...

  5. Apis

    A gorgeous thing!

  6. Slade

    You obviously were mistaken



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